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Making decisions the right way

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  • nickols@worldnet.att.net
    Thanks for the article Rosanna. I ve glanced at it and will read it again more thoroughly. Based on my experience, I think there are two very different uses
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 1, 2005
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      Thanks for the article Rosanna. I've glanced at it and will read it again more thoroughly.

      Based on my experience, I think there are two very different uses of "process" found in the world of work and their existence accounts for some of the distaste for process cited in the article.

      On the one hand, "process" is a very rational, industrial engineering kind of term that refers to stocks and flows and delays and all manner of things pertaining to how work gets done.

      But, "process" is also often used to refer to more slippery, socio-political kinds of dynamics and outright shenannigans. The heart of the matter here is often power.

      So, when I go in to an organization to study "a process" it is usually a rational undertaking. But, when I run afoul of "the process" that is usually a political, cultural event.

      When you set out to study the decision-making processes of an organization you have to deal with both forms of process. There is a rational aspect to it but it is also hotly political.

      --
      Fred Nickols
      nickols@...
      www.nickols.us


      > Date: Fri, 30 Sep 2005 22:02:20 +0200
      > From: "Rosanna Tarsiero" <rosanna@...>
      > Subject: Why making the decisions the right way is more important than making
      > the right decisions
      >
      > Folks,
      >
      > I read this article (below) today and immediately started thinking about
      > intersections among CoPs, managerial style and organizational culture...
      >
      > "Many managers disdain "process" - organizations that put a premium on "the
      > way things have always been done around here" over those that champion bold
      > and rapid decision making. Ironically, as this author states, making the
      > right decision is less important than focusing on how the decision is made -
      > the process. In a compelling argument he makes the case that examining how
      > decisions are made, rather than the decisions themselves, will lead to
      > better decisions."
      >
      > http://www.iveybusinessjournal.com/view_article.asp?intArticle_ID=578
      >
      > Any thoughts?
      >
      > Rosanna Tarsiero
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