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Re: [cp] Prerequisite values for a successful COP?

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  • Rosanna Tarsiero
    Noreen, ... You mean the ethnographic approach can t be used in these settings? Can you articulate more? I just want to have a clear understanding :) Rosanna
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 31, 2005
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      Noreen,

      > It is also impossible to track if you are personally
      > involved with the group.

      You mean the ethnographic approach can't be used in these settings?
      Can you articulate more? I just want to have a clear understanding :)

      Rosanna
      --
      Visit my blog at: http://gionnetto.blogspot.com/
      "Don't be so open minded that your brain falls out."
    • John D. Smith
      I m about a third of the way through this book on Company Command, which makes the passion behind that community really palpable: Nancy M. Dixon, Nate Allen,
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 1, 2005
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        I'm about a third of the way through this book on Company Command, which
        makes the passion behind that community really palpable:

        Nancy M. Dixon, Nate Allen, Tony Burgess, Pete Kilner, Steve Schweitzer,
        "CompanyCommand; Unleashing the power of the army profession" (West Point,
        NY: Center for the Advancement of Leader Development & Organizational
        Learning, 2005).

        One thing that strikes me is how compelling the book is, even though the
        Army talks a very peculiar language FULL of acronyms and abbreviations. All
        kinds of issues come up in this book, which is REALLY worth a careful read.
        One issue is about the values that inform a community compared with the
        values that inform a practice. Obviously there's a connection, but in the
        last week or so the emphasis on this list seems to be the values with
        respect to the community.

        As it happens, in the January I7, 2005 issue of The New Yorker (pp. 42-48)
        there's an article that talks about learning in the US Army and Company
        Command that opens with an absolutely stunning opening scene. Among other
        things it suggests to me that values may be "there" but are expressed in
        very surprising ways when we're in surprising circumstances (e.g., daily
        life, eh?). There's a little vignette that includes knowledge nuggets,
        which is another reminder that what knowledge "goes together" in practice
        (i.e., "domain" in Etienne's scheme) is absolutely impossible to describe a
        priori:

        ... The more aggressive you look and the faster you are, the less likely the
        enemy will mess with you. It is okay to tell your soldiers what the
        regulation is; but as a commander, you should make the effort to get the
        soldier home for the birth. A single wall of sandbags will not stop any
        significant munitions. Take pictures of everything and even, maybe more
        importantly, everyone. The right photo in the right hands can absolutely
        make the difference. .... Cotton holds water. Even with the best socks, and
        plenty of foot powder, your feet are likely to start peeling like you've
        never experienced. You're more likely to be injured by not wearing a
        seatbelt than from enemy activity.

        Last week I met with 15 students in the Royal Roads Knowledge Management
        program, many of whom signed up to work on a case study (as I gather) about
        a situation where a reporter (not from The New Yorker) started poking around
        Company Command, causing some real disruption. The story as I heard it from
        Pete Kilner suggests that a community's visibility may be very helpful
        (translating into i.e., more resources, more participation) but it can be a
        double-edged sword in the sense that what's said in confidence on a website
        can ruffle feathers or really be mis-interpreted.

        I find that similar issues comes up for me in CPsquare. I've never
        systematically TOLD everyone in CPsquare to read com-prac (although I think
        they really should because of the high quality of who posts and what's said)
        or proposed to everyone on com-prac that they should join CPsquare (which,
        despite the completely out-of-date website is alive and well). Does anybody
        else have thoughts about the boundaries around online communities and how to
        handle them?

        John
        *
        * John D. Smith - John.Smith@... V: 503.963.8229
        * Workshop on social Status as a scaffolding for learning -- in Portland
        * http://www.learningalliances.net/StatusScaffold/ starts Feb 16th!
        * "With company you quicken your ascent." -- Rumi
      • claudiovitari
        Hi My colleagues and I, we are studying CoPs and we have identified among the factors affecting CoPs that having access to information on the other
        Message 3 of 24 , Mar 3, 2005
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          Hi
          My colleagues and I, we are studying CoPs and we have identified among
          the factors affecting CoPs that having access to information on the
          other participants to the COPs is appreciated. An information could be
          like:
          role in the company, project participations, white papers authoring, etc.

          Unfortunately, We are still studying the factors sustaining CoPs and
          therefore we do not have any confirmed result

          We are also working to find way to sustain COPS though the automatic
          publication of information on the CoPs participants, through Expertise
          management systems (EMS).

          In particupar we are searching for partners interesting in developing
          EMS solutions or adopting EMS.

          For details:
          http://cetic.liuc.it/people/cvitari/project.htm


          --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "richie fahey" <RICKO@E...> wrote:
          >
          > I am doing some research on Values with COP's? Is there specific
          > values such as pride, trust, altruism etc. that are considered
          > necessary for sustaining a COP in the long term? Is there any good
          > research into this topic and what the values are?
        • Warren Crosbie
          I am interested in what content management systems have to offer CoPs. Can anyone offer any recent critiques or case studies of CMS used to build community Web
          Message 4 of 24 , Mar 19, 2005
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            I am interested in what content management systems have to offer
            CoPs. Can anyone offer any recent critiques or case studies of CMS
            used to build community Web sites?

            I've noticed a couple of papers on PlatoonLeader and CompanyCommand
            (thanks to the com-prac list for the heads-up); I am interested in
            arguments that back up Long and Schweitzer's recommendation of
            the
            Tomoye CMS for the PlatoonLeader CoP.

            Why should Tomoye bee seen as <strong>the<strong> Community of
            Practice company? And is Tomoye the best CMS for developing CoPs?
            (See www.tomoye.com) So far I've come across the following articles
            (and .ppt):
            1. Information and Knowledge Transfer through Archival Journals and
            On-Line Communities, by Lyle N. Long and Steven J. Schweitzer, AIAA
            Paper 2004-1264, Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, Jan., 2004:
            http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/l/n/lnl/papers/aiaa2004_1264.pdf
            2. Discussion Forums: The Core of Online Communities of Practice, by
            Steven J. Schweitzer:
            http://java.cs.vt.edu/public/classes/communities/uploads/schweitzer59
            7_project.pdf
            3. 'Online CoPs', slides by Lyle N. Long
            http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/l/n/lnl/papers/cop2004b.pdf

            Warren Crosbie, Melbourne, Australia
            http://hypertext.rmit.edu.au/~crosbie/wp/

            --- In com-prac@yahoogroups.com, "John D. Smith" <john.smith@l...>
            wrote (Wed Feb 2, 2005):
            > I'm about a third of the way through this book on Company Command,
            which makes the passion behind that community really palpable:
            > Nancy M. Dixon, Nate Allen, Tony Burgess, Pete Kilner, Steve
            Schweitzer, "CompanyCommand; Unleashing the power of the army
            profession" (West Point, NY: Center for the Advancement of Leader
            Development & Organizational Learning, 2005).
          • John D. Smith
            On Saturday, March 19, 2005 12:15 AM, Warren Crosbie ... That s the vendor s question. Depending on whether you re a software developer, it seems to me that
            Message 5 of 24 , Mar 20, 2005
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              On Saturday, March 19, 2005 12:15 AM, Warren Crosbie
              [mailto:wcrosbie@...] writes:

              > I am interested in what content management systems
              > have to offer CoPs.

              That's the vendor's question. Depending on whether you're a software
              developer, it seems to me that that may be the wrong question. Consider an
              alternative question:

              > What are all the different tools and technologies that
              > communities of practice need to manage their "stuff"?

              Among other things, if you ask it this way, it may turn out that communities
              will use several tools. If you read the Company Command book closely, they
              obviously are living on a Tomoye platform, but they also use A LOT of email,
              telephone, and they all fly to Hawaii or a military base in Germany and,
              obviously, do a lot of learning on the ground wherever they may be.

              Many years ago, Matthew Simpson and others tut-tutted me when I confounded
              com-prac and the surrounding community and I'm still around to insist that
              it's the worst possible falacy to confuse a community of practice with a
              piece of software.

              John
              *
              * John D. Smith - John.Smith@... V: 503.963.8229
              * A new report on Technologies for Communities is on its way.
              * Blog and announcements at: http://www.technologyforcommunities.com
              * "With company you quicken your ascent" -- Rumi
            • Roy Greenhalgh
              John Smith wrote:- Many years ago, Matthew Simpson and others tut-tutted me when I confounded com-prac and the surrounding community and I m still around to
              Message 6 of 24 , Mar 20, 2005
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                John Smith wrote:-

                Many years ago, Matthew Simpson and others tut-tutted me when I confounded
                com-prac and the surrounding community and I'm still around to insist that it's
                the worst possible falacy to confuse a community of practice with a piece of
                software.

                I wholly agree as all my experience of CoPs has simply used software as an
                adjunct to the ultimtae .. F2F.

                Roy Greenhalgh

                "John D. Smith" wrote:

                > On Saturday, March 19, 2005 12:15 AM, Warren Crosbie
                > [mailto:wcrosbie@...] writes:
                >
                > > I am interested in what content management systems
                > > have to offer CoPs.
                >
                > That's the vendor's question. Depending on whether you're a software
                > developer, it seems to me that that may be the wrong question. Consider an
                > alternative question:
                >
                > > What are all the different tools and technologies that
                > > communities of practice need to manage their "stuff"?
                >
                > Among other things, if you ask it this way, it may turn out that communities
                > will use several tools. If you read the Company Command book closely, they
                > obviously are living on a Tomoye platform, but they also use A LOT of email,
                > telephone, and they all fly to Hawaii or a military base in Germany and,
                > obviously, do a lot of learning on the ground wherever they may be.
                >
                > Many years ago, Matthew Simpson and others tut-tutted me when I confounded
                > com-prac and the surrounding community and I'm still around to insist that
                > it's the worst possible falacy to confuse a community of practice with a
                > piece of software.
                >
                > John
                > *
                > * John D. Smith - John.Smith@... V: 503.963.8229
                > * A new report on Technologies for Communities is on its way.
                > * Blog and announcements at: http://www.technologyforcommunities.com
                > * "With company you quicken your ascent" -- Rumi
                >
                > *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Cornejo Castro, Miguel
                I guess I won t surprise many people with it, but I don t think F2F is fundamental for a CoP :-). So some type of enabler will be needed instead. The CoP is
                Message 7 of 24 , Mar 21, 2005
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                  I guess I won't surprise many people with it, but I don't think F2F is fundamental for a CoP :-).

                  So "some" type of enabler will be needed instead. The CoP is not the resource, and the resource is not the software, but a good software can solve quite a lot of conversation and collaboration needs.

                  Best regards,

                  Miguel



                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Roy Greenhalgh [mailto:rgreenh@...]
                  Sent: domingo, 20 de marzo de 2005 23:21
                  To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [cp] content management (PlatoonLeader & tomoye.com)



                  John Smith wrote:-

                  Many years ago, Matthew Simpson and others tut-tutted me when I confounded
                  com-prac and the surrounding community and I'm still around to insist that it's
                  the worst possible falacy to confuse a community of practice with a piece of
                  software.

                  I wholly agree as all my experience of CoPs has simply used software as an
                  adjunct to the ultimtae .. F2F.

                  Roy Greenhalgh

                  "John D. Smith" wrote:

                  > On Saturday, March 19, 2005 12:15 AM, Warren Crosbie
                  > [mailto:wcrosbie@...] writes:
                  >
                  > > I am interested in what content management systems
                  > > have to offer CoPs.
                  >
                  > That's the vendor's question. Depending on whether you're a software
                  > developer, it seems to me that that may be the wrong question. Consider an
                  > alternative question:
                  >
                  > > What are all the different tools and technologies that
                  > > communities of practice need to manage their "stuff"?
                  >
                  > Among other things, if you ask it this way, it may turn out that communities
                  > will use several tools. If you read the Company Command book closely, they
                  > obviously are living on a Tomoye platform, but they also use A LOT of email,
                  > telephone, and they all fly to Hawaii or a military base in Germany and,
                  > obviously, do a lot of learning on the ground wherever they may be.
                  >
                  > Many years ago, Matthew Simpson and others tut-tutted me when I confounded
                  > com-prac and the surrounding community and I'm still around to insist that
                  > it's the worst possible falacy to confuse a community of practice with a
                  > piece of software.
                  >
                  > John
                  > *
                  > * John D. Smith - John.Smith@... V: 503.963.8229
                  > * A new report on Technologies for Communities is on its way.
                  > * Blog and announcements at: http://www.technologyforcommunities.com
                  > * "With company you quicken your ascent" -- Rumi
                  >
                  > *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  *-- The email forum on communities of practice --*
                  Yahoo! Groups Links
                • Rosanna Tarsiero
                  Miguel, ... Have you ever notice how many persons speak of CoP and KM and what they really mean is *resource* management? That of course dates back to old
                  Message 8 of 24 , Mar 22, 2005
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                    Miguel,

                    > The CoP is not the resource

                    Have you ever notice how many persons speak of CoP and KM and what
                    they really mean is *resource* management?

                    That of course dates back to old information theory paradigms.. some
                    people still think that explicit knowledge is all that there is to
                    learn and use CoPs to store and archive *information*, or collect
                    people like a resouce... how about creating meaning through a
                    conversation? How about social learning? All those theories are
                    becoming old and they didn't notice them yet.

                    I heard of a person using a blog to store links. Speaking of resource
                    management. The favourites folder wasn't enough? I wonder what they
                    could use a wiki for... as blackboard maybe?

                    shrug

                    Rosanna
                    --
                    Visit my blog at: http://gionnetto.blogspot.com/
                    "Don't be so open minded that your brain falls out."
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