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RE: [cp] Silly Fictions

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  • Andy Swarbrick
    I wondered if any of you are familiar with the work of Daniel Goleman on emotional intelligence. When Tony mentioned creating trust being dependent on
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 7, 2003
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      I wondered if any of you are familiar with the work of Daniel Goleman on
      emotional intelligence.
      When Tony mentioned creating trust being dependent on character and
      competence it reminded me of the work I have just done looking at how
      golemans emotional competence framework matches up to the relational
      dimension of social capital.

      Which in english, means I looked at how people with higher levels of
      emotional competencies could build social capital, as they could build
      trust and understanding.

      I thought it would be really useful to merge social capital and
      emotional intelligence as I wanted to show how emotional intelligence of
      individuals might effect the building of networks and communities.

      Once interesting thing to note is that Goleman thinks that emotional
      competencies can be learned, if this is the case it strengthens the idea
      that informal networks and communities can be supported by outside
      intervention.
      If we can build indiviuals emotional competencies it would be possible
      to create stronger networks...

      This really appealed to me as it is a very human way to tackle the
      problem, does not put technology first.
      However, not being one to believe anything I read and very keen on my
      network tools I have set about designing an instrument that will help me
      evaluate this a bit more empirically.
      I have not been able to conduct the research yet, but when I do you'll
      be the first to see the results;-).


      If anyone else has been working with similar ideas with EI and social
      networks, I would love to hear more.
      Also, if anyone knows of a organization that would be willing to
      participate in a study to look at how EI builds social capital please
      send me an email.

      It would involve the completion of an online questionnaire that will be
      a modified version of the IKNOW application that I use for social
      network analysis. It should take 15-30 minutes at the most for each
      member of the group to complete the questionnaire, I will also be able
      to use the same data to create a map of the relationships between people
      in the group.

      Kind Regards

      Andy Swarbrick
      TecLAB
      Department of Speech Communication
      University of Illinois
      Urbana
      IL61820
      Illinois
      USA
      @: swarbric@.../ andy@...
      url: http://www.knowledge-business.co.uk
      Yahoo Group : http://groups.yahoo.com/group/knowledgenetworks


      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Melissiecr@... [mailto:Melissiecr@...]
      > Sent: 06 January 2003 16:30 PM
      > To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [cp] Silly Fictions
      >
      >
      > Thanks, Tony! Rob Cross's work is top notch indeed, and he
      > is in the process of writing a book for Harvard Business
      > Press. I'll post on the list serve once it is published.
      > I'd also like to recommend the book Trust and Betrayal in the
      > Workplace by Dennis and Michelle Reina. While I would like
      > to add a risk assessment to the methodology, I suspect that
      > is in one of the new books they are planning.
      > Regards,
      > Melissie
      >
      >
      > ::: http://www.egroups.com/group/com-prac
      > ::: Email com-prac-unsubscribe@egroups.com to unsubscribe
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
    • Seth Kahan
      Andy, I am very interested in the relationship between EI and social capital development, and would appreciate being kept in the loop on any work you might do
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 7, 2003
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        Andy,

        I am very interested in the relationship between EI and social capital
        development, and would appreciate being kept in the loop on any work you
        might do in this area.

        EI continues to receive positive press, often looked upon as a more
        realistic and thorough approach to the "positive thinking" model and the
        human potential movement. Marcus Buckingham, consultant with Gallup,
        recently wrote in Fast Company,

        "In late 2002, the Nobel Prize committee recognized the importance of
        the emotional economy by awarding the economics prize to Daniel
        Kahneman, a Princeton psychology professor. It was the first time the
        economic establishment admitted that a person's psychological makeup is
        the key determining factor in economic behavior.

        "For 2003, I'm intrigued by the questions following that insight: How
        big is the emotional economy? Are we mismanaging it? Have we even begun
        to scratch the surface of how we manage the emotions of our employees
        and our customers?

        "Through our studies at the Gallup Organization, we're just beginning to
        realize how economically valuable emotions are, and it's already clear
        that they're largely out of control. Analysts have even started to
        downgrade companies -- such as Wal-Mart and the Home Depot -- whose
        cultures, they believe, are eroding, even if their earnings are holding
        up."

        I have worked in the World Bank for the last 6 or 7 years (first as a Sr
        Officer, now as a consultant) on the development of community at both an
        institutional level as well as in the smaller "thematic groups" (this is
        the term the Bank uses for CoP). Emotional engagement has always been a
        priority in my work, and I have used specific strategies to develop it
        both in small groups (5 - 60 staff) and in large gatherings (2-4,000
        staff). Now my work is taking me into the association community and the
        government as well. There is no doubt in my mind that EI is a pivotal
        factor in social capital development.

        I would welcome further discussions and exploration in this regard.

        Best,
        Seth
        _________________________________________

        Seth Weaver Kahan
        website: www.SethKahan.com
        Email: Seth@...
        Tel: (301) 229-2221
        Fax: (301) 229-6661

        Click on the link below to subscribe to "Visionary Leadership" my free,
        monthly newsletter on achieving extraordinary results.
        http://lb.bcentral.com/ex/manage/subscriberprefs.aspx?customerid=19632


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Andy Swarbrick [mailto:andy@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2003 10:22 AM
        To: com-prac@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [cp] Silly Fictions

        I wondered if any of you are familiar with the work of Daniel Goleman on
        emotional intelligence.
        When Tony mentioned creating trust being dependent on character and
        competence it reminded me of the work I have just done looking at how
        golemans emotional competence framework matches up to the relational
        dimension of social capital.

        Which in english, means I looked at how people with higher levels of
        emotional competencies could build social capital, as they could build
        trust and understanding.

        I thought it would be really useful to merge social capital and
        emotional intelligence as I wanted to show how emotional intelligence of
        individuals might effect the building of networks and communities.

        Once interesting thing to note is that Goleman thinks that emotional
        competencies can be learned, if this is the case it strengthens the idea
        that informal networks and communities can be supported by outside
        intervention.
        If we can build indiviuals emotional competencies it would be possible
        to create stronger networks...

        This really appealed to me as it is a very human way to tackle the
        problem, does not put technology first.
        However, not being one to believe anything I read and very keen on my
        network tools I have set about designing an instrument that will help me
        evaluate this a bit more empirically.
        I have not been able to conduct the research yet, but when I do you'll
        be the first to see the results;-).


        If anyone else has been working with similar ideas with EI and social
        networks, I would love to hear more.
        Also, if anyone knows of a organization that would be willing to
        participate in a study to look at how EI builds social capital please
        send me an email.

        It would involve the completion of an online questionnaire that will be
        a modified version of the IKNOW application that I use for social
        network analysis. It should take 15-30 minutes at the most for each
        member of the group to complete the questionnaire, I will also be able
        to use the same data to create a map of the relationships between people
        in the group.

        Kind Regards

        Andy Swarbrick
        TecLAB
        Department of Speech Communication
        University of Illinois
        Urbana
        IL61820
        Illinois
        USA
        @: swarbric@.../ andy@...
        url: http://www.knowledge-business.co.uk
        Yahoo Group : http://groups.yahoo.com/group/knowledgenetworks
      • jpalmertx@aol.com
        Regarding Tonys comment, (on Rob Cross work as I recall) about trust and competence, I think that I heard Rob s paper presented at the Academy of Management
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 7, 2003
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          Regarding Tonys comment, (on Rob Cross' work as I recall) about trust and competence, I think that I heard Rob's paper presented at the Academy of Management meeting in Dever this past August. (Where Tony and Nate and colleagues presented well on their online Community efforts!) As I recall I commented from the audience on the finding presented in the paper that, among younger, i.e. newer tenure, employees, the perception of benevolence in the co-worker from whom the new employee decided to seek help, had a somewhat larger impact than perceived competence.

          My comment was that evolutionary psychology has a possible explanation:   a  young member of a social group, new to it, would find "survival" or "success" more likely by seeking the assistance of someone they perceive as benevolent.  A "benevolent" hunting partner for example, might share the hunting results, a malevolent, though perhaps competent partner, might not.  The ability to perceive benevolence would seem to be a strong survival characteristic.

          The longer tenured group members know more about who is benevolent or not, and can shift their assistance decision parameters to "competence"; so for more experienced workers, the predicted order of importance would be competence, then benevolence (with perhaps a check somehow, that benevolence was still present)

          The shorter tenure member will also not be as certain of what competence is, or looks like, more reason to base trust in joint action on benevolence at first, and competence later.



          Implications for CoPs: If the community is to promote sharing, and build trust to help do so, give extra attention to a benevolent introduction for newcomers, and at the startup of the community, and be aware of the ongoing impact of benevolence in general on community members and relationships. 

          For communities that operate on line, I think an interesting question is "What does benevolence look like, how does it operate online?"

          Jim Palmer
          Caldwell Palmer Group
          Consulting on Communities of Practice,
          and Consumer Research Communities
        • Nancy White
          ... * newcomers are visibly welcomed and their initial contributions noted/acknowledged * credit is given in public spaces (not just private) * people operate
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 7, 2003
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            At 03:45 PM 1/7/2003, Jim Palmer wrote:

            >For communities that operate on line, I think an interesting question is
            >"What does benevolence look like, how does it operate online?"

            * newcomers are visibly welcomed and their initial contributions
            noted/acknowledged
            * credit is given in public spaces (not just private)
            * people operate on a "gift economy" principle - you give and you will get,
            but not always in a direct relationship with the individual giver or
            getter, but over time and across the group.
            * people disclose appropriate and accurate information about their selves
            so others can get to know, trust and build relationships over time. (More
            explicit than offline?)


            There's a few to start with. (And good to "see" you, Jim)

            N


            Nancy White
            Full Circle Associates - http://www.fullcirc.com - 206-517-4754
          • Bronwyn Stuckey
            Howdy Jim - long time no talkies :-) At first I thought of benevolent as the charitable part of the definition and it conjured up pictures of the aristocracy
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 7, 2003
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              Howdy Jim - long time no talkies :-)

              At first I thought of benevolent as the charitable part of the definition and
              it conjured up pictures of the aristocracy offerings to the poor - perhaps the
              rich in their finery throwing beads to the poor in New Orleans at Easter
              (personal reflection/indulgence)

              I had to go back to dictionary.com to decide what I made of benevolent (having
              a bad day :-( not feeling benevolent so I thought I would shake myself out of
              it by responding.

              "Benevolent suggests charitableness and a desire to promote the welfare or
              happiness of others: a benevolent contributor."

              So Nancy has started the list. For me the question is not what this looks like
              but what do community members do to 'promote the welfare of others'? It isn't
              all visible is it?

              I would quickly add some subleties:
              - active listen and make efforts to respond quickly to others
              - use friendly and informal greetings and salutations
              - introduce each other - be a connector
              - ask about others day/work/life/interests
              - invite others into dialogues wehn you see them online
              - pinpoint resources and activiites they might take up

              Still thinking this through but gotta run away for now...

              Bronwyn





              Quoting Nancy White <nancyw@...>:

              > At 03:45 PM 1/7/2003, Jim Palmer wrote:
              >
              > >For communities that operate on line, I think an interesting question is
              > >"What does benevolence look like, how does it operate online?"
              >
              > * newcomers are visibly welcomed and their initial contributions
              > noted/acknowledged
              > * credit is given in public spaces (not just private)
              > * people operate on a "gift economy" principle - you give and you will get,
              > but not always in a direct relationship with the individual giver or
              > getter, but over time and across the group.
              > * people disclose appropriate and accurate information about their selves
              > so others can get to know, trust and build relationships over time. (More
              > explicit than offline?)
              >
              >
              > There's a few to start with. (And good to "see" you, Jim)
              >
              > N
              >
              >
              > Nancy White
              > Full Circle Associates - http://www.fullcirc.com - 206-517-4754
              >
              >
              > ::: http://www.egroups.com/group/com-prac
              > ::: Email com-prac-unsubscribe@egroups.com to unsubscribe
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • jpalmertx@aol.com
              Hello to Nancy and Bronwyn, good to see you both in this new year, and to hear your familiar and knowledgeable online voices. Hope the year is starting well,
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 8, 2003
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                Hello to Nancy and Bronwyn, good to "see" you both in this new year, and to hear your familiar and knowledgeable online voices. 

                Hope the year is starting well, and glad to see the comprac list has benevolent and therapeutic uses (!) in helping Bronwyn with a tough day:-). 
                Many thanks to you Nancy (and collegue Michaela Missou) for your great online facilitation class I took last fall, where I did some good learning and observing about benevolence.

                Thoughtful comments from both of you on the topic. 

                Bronwyn, regards your good point about "respond quickly", I heard response time mentioned recently also in a commentary on some social research,  and how we use response time to affect our thoughts/social evaluation of others. 
                I wonder in what ways it   depends on the response time expected, and the type of talk occuring  e.g. In the ayschronous online environment, perhaps there is room for both short-term, and longer conversations?  Time is a relative thing, so how do we know the "right" response time, or I wonder how would people typically measure that?

                Some things I have noticed re benevolence, in Nancy's class,  and elsewhere:

                - Posting photographs (our smiling self, friends, front porch in Australia, etc.) gives others a variety of indicators/information about our benevolence and interests (interests as a surrogate for competence, area of capability)
                - Casual talk; we had a clever place in Nancy's class to post "Just Three Words", for a bit of fun, but it also gives shape to us as persons.
                -  The welcome circle online, or welcoming process f2f
                -  Sharing proportionately
                -  Encouraging a balance in life, showing care for others, by taking time to consider the personal, as well as formal, or business aspect of the community:
                - Echoing: "oh, I had a similar experience"
                - stories we tell, and remembering the stories we hear to share again later in joint appreciation
                - celebrations in various ways

                Jim





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