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Removing dents from wood

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  • Marty
    Reading this list I often wish I d delved into woodworking earlier in life so I d be a master at it now. There is so much depth to this area of knowledge it
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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      Reading this list I often wish I'd delved into woodworking earlier in
      life so I'd be a master at it now. There is so much depth to this area
      of knowledge it boggles me. Here is something new I learned this morning.

      http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-remove-a-dent-from-wood/

      --
      Marty ~ '74 C28 ~ Coastal North Carolina
    • cchl74
      One of the interesting aspects of wood and metal working is the progression of available tools. Starting out as a kid in my father s shop, I had use of hand
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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        One of the interesting aspects of wood and metal working is the progression of available tools. Starting out as a kid in my father's shop, I had use of hand drills, (the kind you crank), wood planes and chisels, (not the good ones), hand saws, and files. So, I guess one can say that I learned the principles. But because of the inventive genius of the tool industry and a real income, I now have access to power saws, power drills, routers, lathes, and all sorts of magical jigs and gadgets that do a better job a hundred times faster. So perhaps one can argue that starting earlier at the knees of a master is better, but it is sort of like arguing that scouting a road by foot helps when you drive it.


              Bruce K
              Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
              Los Lunas, NM



        Reading this list I often wish I'd delved into woodworking earlier in
        life so I'd be a master at it now. There is so much depth to this area
        of knowledge it boggles me. Here is something new I learned this morning.

        http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-remove-a-dent-from-wood/

        --
        Marty ~ '74 C28 ~ Coastal North Carolina


      • Marty
        ... Understood, but when driving, having a pair of shoes with you, you still have the ability to walk a distance should that become necessary. Same with
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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          On 07/29/2014 11:13 AM, Kbjmjrb@... [columbiasailingyachts] wrote:
          > So perhaps one can argue that starting earlier at the knees of a master
          > is better, but it is sort of like arguing that scouting a road by foot
          > helps when you drive it.

          Understood, but when driving, having a pair of shoes with you, you still
          have the ability to walk a distance should that become necessary. Same
          with keeping some non-powered tools, like one of the drills below,
          stowed away in corners, not just for wood, but metal or whatever.

          http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Larson-Swing-Brace-Chuck/dp/B000JRFJQO
          http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-85116984J-Hand-Drill-8511698/dp/B00004T80S
          http://www.amazon.com/Schroeder-Hand-Drill-4-Inch-Capacity/dp/B000JRDLVY

          I already have one of these (noticed my argon tank went flat, not sure
          if valve is faulty or what yet):
          http://readywelder.com

          What are any offbeat tools the more DIY type cruisers on the list carry
          with them that you think are essential? Heck, list the more obvious
          ones also as they might not at first seem obvious to me being new at
          this. Maybe we can end up with a list recommended tool list to put in
          the forum files section.

          --
          Marty ~ '74 C28 ~ Coastal North Carolina
        • cchl74
          10 forceps, Harbor Freight #65709, $4. Bruce K Challenger # 74, Ouroboros Los Lunas, NM
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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            10" forceps, Harbor Freight #65709, $4.

                Bruce K
                Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                Los Lunas, NM 




            Understood, but when driving, having a pair of shoes with you, you still
            have the ability to walk a distance should that become necessary. Same
            with keeping some non-powered tools, like one of the drills below,
            stowed away in corners, not just for wood, but metal or whatever.

            http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Larson-Swing-Brace-Chuck/dp/B000JRFJQO
            http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-85116984J-Hand-Drill-8511698/dp/B00004T80S
            http://www.amazon.com/Schroeder-Hand-Drill-4-Inch-Capacity/dp/B000JRDLVY

            I already have one of these (noticed my argon tank went flat, not sure
            if valve is faulty or what yet):
            http://readywelder.com

            What are any offbeat tools the more DIY type cruisers on the list carry
            with them that you think are essential? Heck, list the more obvious
            ones also as they might not at first seem obvious to me being new at
            this. Maybe we can end up with a list recommended tool list to put in
            the forum files section.

            --
            Marty ~ '74 C28 ~ Coastal North Carolina

          • Jim Muri
            I have some dams built of scrap wood and foam pipe insulation that fit snugly between the toe rail and cabin top.  They are braced by a portlet frame
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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              I have some 'dams' built of scrap wood and foam pipe insulation that fit snugly between the toe rail and cabin top.  They are braced by a portlet frame (forward dam) and a shroud line (aft dam.)  The two 'dams,' when emplaced, are about 8 feet apart.  Between these two 'dams' is the fresh water fill.  The dams can be put in place in seconds during a rainfall.  Guess what the dams are for?  <G> 

              Tools required: Swiss army knife, hand or power saw.
              Materials: about a foot and a half of scrap 1x4, some leftover foam pipe insulation.

              Suggested boat tool: Swiss army knife.
               
              James R. Muri

              Novelist, Sailor
              BUY: My e-Novels at Amazon or my book site.
              VISIT: My Literary site.  
              READ: My blog

              From: "Marty marty@... [columbiasailingyachts]" <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>
              To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 9:25 AM
              Subject: Tool list for cruisers (was Re: CYOA - Removing dents from wood

               
              On 07/29/2014 11:13 AM, Kbjmjrb@... [columbiasailingyachts] wrote:
              > So perhaps one can argue that starting earlier at the knees of a master
              > is better, but it is sort of like arguing that scouting a road by foot
              > helps when you drive it.

              Understood, but when driving, having a pair of shoes with you, you still
              have the ability to walk a distance should that become necessary. Same
              with keeping some non-powered tools, like one of the drills below,
              stowed away in corners, not just for wood, but metal or whatever.

              http://www.amazon.com/Robert-Larson-Swing-Brace-Chuck/dp/B000JRFJQO
              http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-85116984J-Hand-Drill-8511698/dp/B00004T80S
              http://www.amazon.com/Schroeder-Hand-Drill-4-Inch-Capacity/dp/B000JRDLVY

              I already have one of these (noticed my argon tank went flat, not sure
              if valve is faulty or what yet):
              http://readywelder.com

              What are any offbeat tools the more DIY type cruisers on the list carry
              with them that you think are essential? Heck, list the more obvious
              ones also as they might not at first seem obvious to me being new at
              this. Maybe we can end up with a list recommended tool list to put in
              the forum files section.

              --
              Marty ~ '74 C28 ~ Coastal North Carolina


            • David Tice
              I m not a cruiser but I keep a small selection of tools and parts in a plastic box next to the battery under the settee. The Swiss Army knife is the deluxe
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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                I'm not a cruiser but I keep a small selection of tools and parts in a plastic box next to the battery under the settee. The Swiss Army knife is the deluxe style. A combo knife, marlin spike with shackle tool. I've used it several times. Another thing I keep is a small spool of waxed string with a curved appolstry needle stuck in it. Very handy.
                Cheers,
                Dave T

                Sent from my iPhone
              • cchl74
                When selecting a sailing knife, try to find one with a lanyard ring. They are a bit rare in the civilian world. A few of the Victronox s have them, I think the
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 29, 2014
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                  When selecting a sailing knife, try to find one with a lanyard ring. They are a bit rare in the civilian world. A few of the Victronox's have them, I think the Officer's Model does.  Make up a lanyard with parachute cord. They help pulling the knife out of your pocket and keep the blade near when working on the deck or up above.


                        Bruce K
                        Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                        Los Lunas, NM



                  I'm not a cruiser but I keep a small selection of tools and parts in a plastic box next to the battery under the settee. The Swiss Army knife is the deluxe style. A combo knife, marlin spike with shackle tool. I've used it several times. Another thing I keep is a small spool of waxed string with a curved appolstry needle stuck in it. Very handy.
                  Cheers,
                  Dave T

                  Sent from my iPhone

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