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Mounting bronze to stainless

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  • jeffkuthy
    If I am mounting a bronze deck flange to a 316 stainless deck plate. Do I have to isolate them from each other? Thanks Jeff Kuthy CLY9.6 #56 Wind Whisperer
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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      If I am mounting a bronze deck flange to a 316 stainless deck plate. Do I have to isolate them from each other?

      Thanks

      Jeff Kuthy

      CLY9.6 #56

      Wind Whisperer

      Port Clinton, OH

    • Michael Perry
      I recently closed off a bronze thru-hull with a 316 stainless steel cap. I was told by the plumbing supply store that corrosion wouldn t be an issue between
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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        I recently closed off a bronze thru-hull with a 316 stainless steel cap. I was told by the plumbing supply store that corrosion wouldn't be an issue between the two metals.

        Sent from my iPad
      • cchl74
        ... This is a galvanic corrosion problem rather than electrolytic corrosion. The two are opposite. Electrolytic corrosion is like a plating bath. It takes an
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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          If I am mounting a bronze deck flange to a 316 stainless deck plate. Do I have to isolate them from each other?

          Thanks

          Jeff Kuthy

          CLY9.6 #56

          Wind Whisperer

          Port Clinton, OH


          Jeff,

               This is a galvanic corrosion problem rather than electrolytic corrosion. The two are opposite. Electrolytic corrosion is like a plating bath. It takes an active electric current applied to the system. Your concern is galvanic corrosion and this is how a battery works. It takes two metals of different galvanic potential and they must be in contact with each other in two ways. There must be an electrolyte to carry metal ions going one way and there also must be an electric connection to carry the electrons going the other way. In your case, obviously the two metals are in electrical contact but there is no electrolyte under dry conditions. Salt water, however, will work as an electrolyte so if a little water gets in between. corrosion could start. This is often encountered with stainless screws that attach hardware to an aluminum alloy mast. That white powder is the result of galvanic corrosion. What I recommend in your case is to use Tef-Gel between them. This is specifically formulated to prevent contact galvanic corrosion. It is available from places like Jamestown Supply.
           
               Bruce K
               Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
               Los Lunas, NM

        • Jesse Doyle
          What a pain in the butt. You not only have to isolate the bronze from the stainless but the bolts (or screws) from either one from the other. From:
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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            What a pain in the butt. You not only have to isolate the bronze from the stainless but the bolts (or screws) from either one from the other.

             

            From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Monday, June 23, 2014 7:27 AM
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: CYOA - Mounting bronze to stainless

             

             

             



            If I am mounting a bronze deck flange to a 316 stainless deck plate. Do I have to isolate them from each other?

            Thanks

            Jeff Kuthy

            CLY9.6 #56

            Wind Whisperer

            Port Clinton, OH


            Jeff,


                 This is a galvanic corrosion problem rather than electrolytic corrosion. The two are opposite. Electrolytic corrosion is like a plating bath. It takes an active electric current applied to the system. Your concern is galvanic corrosion and this is how a battery works. It takes two metals of different galvanic potential and they must be in contact with each other in two ways. There must be an electrolyte to carry metal ions going one way and there also must be an electric connection to carry the electrons going the other way. In your case, obviously the two metals are in electrical contact but there is no electrolyte under dry conditions. Salt water, however, will work as an electrolyte so if a little water gets in between. corrosion could start. This is often encountered with stainless screws that attach hardware to an aluminum alloy mast. That white powder is the result of galvanic corrosion. What I recommend in your case is to use Tef-Gel between them. This is specifically formulated to prevent contact galvanic corrosion. It is available from places like Jamestown Supply.
             
                 Bruce K
                 Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                 Los Lunas, NM

             

          • jeffreykuthy
            Thanks Bruce That was my suspicion. I don t know what we d do without ya. Probably perish!!! Jeff -------- Original message -------- From:
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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              Thanks Bruce
              That was my suspicion.
              I don't know what we'd do without ya.
              Probably perish!!!
              Jeff


              -------- Original message --------
              From: "Kbjmjrb@... [columbiasailingyachts]"
              Date:06/23/2014 10:26 AM (GMT-05:00)
              To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: CYOA - Mounting bronze to stainless

               

               



              If I am mounting a bronze deck flange to a 316 stainless deck plate. Do I have to isolate them from each other?

              Thanks

              Jeff Kuthy

              CLY9.6 #56

              Wind Whisperer

              Port Clinton, OH


              Jeff,

                   This is a galvanic corrosion problem rather than electrolytic corrosion. The two are opposite. Electrolytic corrosion is like a plating bath. It takes an active electric current applied to the system. Your concern is galvanic corrosion and this is how a battery works. It takes two metals of different galvanic potential and they must be in contact with each other in two ways. There must be an electrolyte to carry metal ions going one way and there also must be an electric connection to carry the electrons going the other way. In your case, obviously the two metals are in electrical contact but there is no electrolyte under dry conditions. Salt water, however, will work as an electrolyte so if a little water gets in between. corrosion could start. This is often encountered with stainless screws that attach hardware to an aluminum alloy mast. That white powder is the result of galvanic corrosion. What I recommend in your case is to use Tef-Gel between them. This is specifically formulated to prevent contact galvanic corrosion. It is available from places like Jamestown Supply.
               
                   Bruce K
                   Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                   Los Lunas, NM

            • Jim Muri
              You may mount bronze and stainless together without isolation.  They are very close on the galvanic scale.  That is why stainless prop shafts and bronze thru
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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                You may mount bronze and stainless together without isolation.  They are very close on the galvanic scale.  That is why stainless prop shafts and bronze thru hulls can co-exist underwater for decades.
                 
                James R. Muri

                Novelist, Sailor
                BUY: My e-Novels at Amazon or my book site.
                VISIT: My Literary site.  
                READ: My blog

                From: "'Jesse Doyle' jess81452@... [columbiasailingyachts]" <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>
                To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, June 23, 2014 8:11 AM
                Subject: RE: CYOA - Mounting bronze to stainless

                 
                What a pain in the butt. You not only have to isolate the bronze from the stainless but the bolts (or screws) from either one from the other.
                 
                From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com]
                Sent: Monday, June 23, 2014 7:27 AM
                To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: CYOA - Mounting bronze to stainless
                 
                 
                 


                If I am mounting a bronze deck flange to a 316 stainless deck plate. Do I have to isolate them from each other?

                Thanks

                Jeff Kuthy

                CLY9.6 #56

                Wind Whisperer

                Port Clinton, OH


                Jeff,

                     This is a galvanic corrosion problem rather than electrolytic corrosion. The two are opposite. Electrolytic corrosion is like a plating bath. It takes an active electric current applied to the system. Your concern is galvanic corrosion and this is how a battery works. It takes two metals of different galvanic potential and they must be in contact with each other in two ways. There must be an electrolyte to carry metal ions going one way and there also must be an electric connection to carry the electrons going the other way. In your case, obviously the two metals are in electrical contact but there is no electrolyte under dry conditions. Salt water, however, will work as an electrolyte so if a little water gets in between. corrosion could start. This is often encountered with stainless screws that attach hardware to an aluminum alloy mast. That white powder is the result of galvanic corrosion. What I recommend in your case is to use Tef-Gel between them. This is specifically formulated to prevent contact galvanic corrosion. It is available from places like Jamestown Supply.
                 
                     Bruce K
                     Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                     Los Lunas, NM

                 


              • cchl74
                In cold water, if it is 316, yes. But down towards the tropics, most experts recommend either Inconel or Monel, which are, indeed, very close to bronze on the
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 23, 2014
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                  In cold water, if it is 316, yes. But down towards the tropics, most experts recommend either Inconel or Monel, which are, indeed, very close to bronze on the Galvanic Scale. For the real tropics, it is generally recommend to use at least 316 even above the water line.


                         Bruce K
                         Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                         Los Lunas, NM





                  You may mount bronze and stainless together without isolation.  They are very close on the galvanic scale.  That is why stainless prop shafts and bronze thru hulls can co-exist underwater for decades.


                  James R. Muri

                  Novelist, Sailor
                  BUY: My e-Novels at Amazon or my book site.
                  VISIT: My L iterary site
                  READ: My blog.

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