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Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

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  • cchl74
    It has been my experience with polyethylene that it really is not a solvent problem but more of an osmotic pressure and patience problem. I prefer to use Dawn
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 20, 2013
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      It has been my experience with polyethylene that it really is not a solvent problem but more of an osmotic pressure and patience problem. I prefer to use Dawn in clean water and several days of soaking. The solution tends to leach out the crud. The alcohol solution however is intriguing. It might be that the proper procedure is to fill the tank with something like rum or whisky and slowly drain the tank, (by hand sounds good).

            Bruce K
            Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
            Los Lunas, NM  





      Wow, nice custom tanks!!

      I was curious because my 9.6 has one surviving roto molded polyethylene tanks, and I thought the 10.7 might have similar build.

      Paul, I wonder if you will be able to get them spotless (I doubt it) because the poly does take and hold stains.

      For my own use, I would flush, rinse with a mild solvent like denatured alcohol to take out any free hydrocarbons, and then fill with water treated with chlorite (Aquabon treatment) to kill any bacteria.

      Chlorite is a good effective antimicrobial treatment, with no taste or odor to speak of, compared to chlorine.

      jmho ~ pete

    • pajama1lama
      Man, this new website is hard for me to work. Bear with me, I lost my previous post. if it pops up after all, that s ok, just more stuff in your inbox, sorry.
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 21, 2013
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        Man, this new website is hard for me to work. Bear with me, I lost my previous post. if it pops up after

        all, that's ok, just more stuff in your inbox, sorry.

        Rum or whiskey would work, for sure.

        But after that, I would not.....;-|

         

        If you are concerned with discoloration, it may be permeating the poly, and can't be removed.

        A coat of food grade epoxy white on the exterior of the tank would take care of that.

        If odors in your water are of (rather legitimate) concern, then stripping with detergent, or caustic wash followed by acid wash, OR alcohol/water rinse followed by copious water rinse, and sanitizing with low odor chlorite.

        Poly holds the scent of diesel pretty well, just from sharing the same space, much less immersed in bilge water. It's easy to take the smell away, that is the good news.

        But, what Paul asked for is a place that does steam cleaning.

        I don't recall your location, but here is and example:

          http://www.yellowpages.com/glen-burnie-md/mip/glen-burnie-detail-center-inc-11944350?lid=180074661&show_map=true

        They are listed as steam cleaning engines.

        Cheers

        ~ pete

         



        --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        It has been my experience with polyethylene that it really is not a solvent problem but more of an osmotic pressure and patience problem. I prefer to use Dawn in clean water and several days of soaking. The solution tends to leach out the crud. The alcohol solution however is intriguing. It might be that the proper procedure is to fill the tank with something like rum or whisky and slowly drain the tank, (by hand sounds good).

              Bruce K
              Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
              Los Lunas, NM  





        Wow, nice custom tanks!!

        I was curious because my 9.6 has one surviving roto molded polyethylene tanks, and I thought the 10.7 might have similar build.

        Paul, I wonder if you will be able to get them spotless (I doubt it) because the poly does take and hold stains.

        For my own use, I would flush, rinse with a mild solvent like denatured alcohol to take out any free hydrocarbons, and then fill with water treated with chlorite (Aquabon treatment) to kill any bacteria.

        Chlorite is a good effective antimicrobial treatment, with no taste or odor to speak of, compared to chlorine.

        jmho ~ pete

      • pajama1lama
        http://www.enviromatic.com/ --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, wrote: The plan was to have them steam
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 21, 2013
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           http://www.enviromatic.com/



          --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          The plan was to have them steam cleaned then treat with Clorox followed
          by testing. Still having trouble finding a steam cleaner...

          Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
          Freelance Boating Writer
          www.thevirtualboatyard.com
          www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
          www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley

          On 9/20/2013 1:44 PM, Richard Dondero wrote:
          > Paul,
          > You might want to try a 10% Clorox solution. If you are planning on
          > using the water for drinking either after steam or Clorox treatment I
          > would have the water tested after being in the tank for a day or so.
          > In fact, before I drank from those tanks, I would do both, but again I
          > am a biologist......
          > Richard
          >
          > *From:* Paul Esterle <pesterle@...>
          > *To:* columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
          > *Sent:* Friday, September 20, 2013 1:14 PM
          > *Subject:* Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks [1 Attachment]
          >
          > Roto molded plastic....
          >
          > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
          > Freelance Boating Writer
          > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
          > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
          > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
          >
          > On 9/19/2013 7:00 PM, petemalone@...
          > <mailto:petemalone@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Not specifically a steam cleaner, but I am curious and would like to
          > > ask a question, if you don't mind.
          > >
          > > I am wondering what material they are made from?
          > >
          > > ~ pete
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>,
          > > <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:
          > >
          > > Okay, I got the two center line water tanks out of my 10.7. They had
          > > been disconnected and unused since before I bought the boat.
          > > Unfortunately, they both have several gallons of about the nastiest
          > > water in them you have ever seen. I trying to find someone at the head
          > > of the bay to steam clean them. Anybody know of anyone?
          > >
          > > --
          > > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
          > > Freelance Boating Writer
          > > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
          > > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
          > > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Columbia Yacht Owners Association Website:
          > http://www.columbia-yachts.com/
          >
          > Home:
          > http://www.egroups.com/group/columbiasailingyachts/
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: columbiasailingyachts@...
          > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@...>
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          > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Jim Muri
          Don t succumb to the temptation to overengineer solutions to simple problems, folks. Water is potable if it is free of poisonous life and toxins.  It is
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 21, 2013
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            Don't succumb to the temptation to overengineer solutions to simple problems, folks.

            Water is potable if it is free of poisonous life and toxins.  It is palatable if it is free of odd flavors and smells and mysterious chunks.  So the approach is to get a few clean rags and / or a high pressure hose, swab out the tanks, pour in REAL hot water (150 degrees or hotter) and slosh it around good, then swab again, and keep doing that until you've glommed out as much crud as you can.  Don't expect to get it all.  Then you re-install the tank, install a particulate filter (more accurately, a strainer) and then, between the particulate strainer  and your spigots, a carbon filter.  Those two will remove chunks and filter out any residual chlorine, chemicals, most metals, toxins, and smells / flavors.  Then treat with Clorox (plain, ordinary, no frills Clorox or its generic equivalents available at Walmart and other places) and add your water.  Every time you refill your tank after that, add the appropriate amount of Clorox first.  Then don't worry about bugs, because the Clorox takes care of them.  After refilling and before you use this water, leave the fill port open for at least a half hour to allow some of the chlorine fumes to escape.  You can get everything you need for this at Walmart.

            Yes, in a previous lifetime I held certification as a water quality specialist.

            Yes, there are other ways to deal with this, including reverse osmosis, UV light systems, etc.  most of which are bigger buck solutions and prone to being difficult to keep working.  Clorox works every time it's tried.  Follow the directions provided in the link above and you'll stay healthy and your water will taste good and not add disturbing material to your bourbon and branch after-supper cocktails.

            Yes, there are 'pills' that can be added to water to treat it for bugs.  They will work, but they will still require the filters mentioned above and are about three orders of magnitude more expensive per gallon than the method outlined above.

            One last note:  chlorine (Clorox) is corrosive.  Don't let freshly treated water get on the hose clamps or other metal items in or near your plumbing systems.     
             

            From: "petemalone@..." <petemalone@...>
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 10:01 AM
            Subject: RE: Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

             


            --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            The plan was to have them steam cleaned then treat with Clorox followed
            by testing. Still having trouble finding a steam cleaner...

            Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
            Freelance Boating Writer
            www.thevirtualboatyard.com
            www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
            www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley

            On 9/20/2013 1:44 PM, Richard Dondero wrote:
            > Paul,
            > You might want to try a 10% Clorox solution. If you are planning on
            > using the water for drinking either after steam or Clorox treatment I
            > would have the water tested after being in the tank for a day or so.
            > In fact, before I drank from those tanks, I would do both, but again I
            > am a biologist......
            > Richard
            >
            > *From:* Paul Esterle <pesterle@...>
            > *To:* columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            > *Sent:* Friday, September 20, 2013 1:14 PM
            > *Subject:* Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks [1 Attachment]
            >
            > Roto molded plastic....
            >
            > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
            > Freelance Boating Writer
            > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
            > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
            > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
            >
            > On 9/19/2013 7:00 PM, petemalone@...
            > <mailto:petemalone@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Not specifically a steam cleaner, but I am curious and would like to
            > > ask a question, if you don't mind.
            > >
            > > I am wondering what material they are made from?
            > >
            > > ~ pete
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>,
            > > <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:
            > >
            > > Okay, I got the two center line water tanks out of my 10.7. They had
            > > been disconnected and unused since before I bought the boat.
            > > Unfortunately, they both have several gallons of about the nastiest
            > > water in them you have ever seen. I trying to find someone at the head
            > > of the bay to steam clean them. Anybody know of anyone?
            > >
            > > --
            > > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
            > > Freelance Boating Writer
            > > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
            > > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
            > > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Columbia Yacht Owners Association Website:
            > http://www.columbia-yachts.com/
            >
            > Home:
            > http://www.egroups.com/group/columbiasailingyachts/
            >
            > To Post a message, send it to: columbiasailingyachts@...
            > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@...>
            >
            > To Subscribe, send a message to:
            > columbiasailingyachts-subscribe@...
            > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-subscribe@...>
            >
            > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > columbiasailingyachts-unsubscribe@...
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            >
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            > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >


          • pajama1lama
            Jim, you are right to keep it simple. Only I don t think there are any hand holes to swab around the insides, but maybe they are there, like in a waste holding
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 21, 2013
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              Jim, you are right to keep it simple.

              Only I don't think there are any hand holes to swab around the insides, but maybe they are there, like in a waste holding tank.

              Chlorine forms trihalomethanes, and the odor lingers. That is why I suggested using sodium chlorite, (NOT hypochlorite) to have odorless disinfection. That is the chemistry in Aquabon, a commonly available brand at marine chandleries.

              It is more costly than bleach, but is purer.

              An ounce treats 20 gallons, and no nasty chlorine odor.

              BTW, I don't drink the tank water, but wash dishes, bathe and flush with it.

              jmho ~ pete

               



              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              Don't succumb to the temptation to overengineer solutions to simple problems, folks.

              Water is potable if it is free of poisonous life and toxins.  It is palatable if it is free of odd flavors and smells and mysterious chunks.  So the approach is to get a few clean rags and / or a high pressure hose, swab out the tanks, pour in REAL hot water (150 degrees or hotter) and slosh it around good, then swab again, and keep doing that until you've glommed out as much crud as you can.  Don't expect to get it all.  Then you re-install the tank, install a particulate filter (more accurately, a strainer) and then, between the particulate strainer  and your spigots, a carbon filter.  Those two will remove chunks and filter out any residual chlorine, chemicals, most metals, toxins, and smells / flavors.  Then treat with Clorox (plain, ordinary, no frills Clorox or its generic equivalents available at Walmart and other places) and add your water.  Every time you refill your tank after that, add the appropriate amount of Clorox first.  Then don't worry about bugs, because the Clorox takes care of them.  After refilling and before you use this water, leave the fill port open for at least a half hour to allow some of the chlorine fumes to escape.  You can get everything you need for this at Walmart.

              Yes, in a previous lifetime I held certification as a water quality specialist.

              Yes, there are other ways to deal with this, including reverse osmosis, UV light systems, etc.  most of which are bigger buck solutions and prone to being difficult to keep working.  Clorox works every time it's tried.  Follow the directions provided in the link above and you'll stay healthy and your water will taste good and not add disturbing material to your bourbon and branch after-supper cocktails.

              Yes, there are 'pills' that can be added to water to treat it for bugs.  They will work, but they will still require the filters mentioned above and are about three orders of magnitude more expensive per gallon than the method outlined above.

              One last note:  chlorine (Clorox) is corrosive.  Don't let freshly treated water get on the hose clamps or other metal items in or near your plumbing systems.     
               
              From: "petemalone@..." <petemalone@...>
              To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 10:01 AM
              Subject: RE: Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

               


              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              The plan was to have them steam cleaned then treat with Clorox followed
              by testing. Still having trouble finding a steam cleaner...

              Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
              Freelance Boating Writer
              www.thevirtualboatyard.com
              www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
              www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley

              On 9/20/2013 1:44 PM, Richard Dondero wrote:
              > Paul,
              > You might want to try a 10% Clorox solution. If you are planning on
              > using the water for drinking either after steam or Clorox treatment I
              > would have the water tested after being in the tank for a day or so.
              > In fact, before I drank from those tanks, I would do both, but again I
              > am a biologist......
              > Richard
              >
              > *From:* Paul Esterle <pesterle@...>
              > *To:* columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              > *Sent:* Friday, September 20, 2013 1:14 PM
              > *Subject:* Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks [1 Attachment]
              >
              > Roto molded plastic....
              >
              > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
              > Freelance Boating Writer
              > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
              > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
              > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
              >
              > On 9/19/2013 7:00 PM, petemalone@...
              > <mailto:petemalone@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Not specifically a steam cleaner, but I am curious and would like to
              > > ask a question, if you don't mind.
              > >
              > > I am wondering what material they are made from?
              > >
              > > ~ pete
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>,
              > > <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:
              > >
              > > Okay, I got the two center line water tanks out of my 10.7. They had
              > > been disconnected and unused since before I bought the boat.
              > > Unfortunately, they both have several gallons of about the nastiest
              > > water in them you have ever seen. I trying to find someone at the head
              > > of the bay to steam clean them. Anybody know of anyone?
              > >
              > > --
              > > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
              > > Freelance Boating Writer
              > > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
              > > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
              > > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Columbia Yacht Owners Association Website:
              > http://www.columbia-yachts.com/
              >
              > Home:
              > http://www.egroups.com/group/columbiasailingyachts/
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: columbiasailingyachts@...
              > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@...>
              >
              > To Subscribe, send a message to:
              > columbiasailingyachts-subscribe@...
              > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-subscribe@...>
              >
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > columbiasailingyachts-unsubscribe@...
              > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-unsubscribe@...>! Groups Links
              >
              >
              > columbiasailingyachts-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >


            • Will
              I pulled my tank and installed two 4 ports.  The tanks are polyethelene. I contacted Ronco- who makes many tanks for production boats- very helpful and
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 21, 2013
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                I pulled my tank and installed two 4" ports.  The tanks are polyethelene. I contacted Ronco- who makes many tanks for production boats- very helpful and responsive even though no profit there.  So, I'm scrubbing by hand, I had a ton of crud that wouldn't have responded to anything less.  Cheers,   Will

              • Paul Esterle
                I m thinking I m going to have to install ports also. What type/brand did you use? Capt n Pauley (Paul Esterle) Freelance Boating Writer
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 21, 2013
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                  I'm thinking I'm going to have to install ports also. What type/brand
                  did you use?

                  Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                  Freelance Boating Writer
                  www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                  www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                  www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley

                  On 9/21/2013 5:34 PM, Will wrote:
                  > I pulled my tank and installed two 4" ports. The tanks are
                  > polyethelene. I contacted Ronco- who makes many tanks for production
                  > boats- very helpful and responsive even though no profit there. So,
                  > I'm scrubbing by hand, I had a ton of crud that wouldn't have
                  > responded to anything less. Cheers, Will
                  >
                  >
                • Jim Muri
                  For some reason, this message didn t get posted to the forum, so I m sending it again.   James R. Muri Novelist, Sailor BUY: My e-Novels at
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 22, 2013
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                    For some reason, this message didn't get posted to the forum, so I'm sending it again.
                     
                    ----- Forwarded Message -----
                    From: Jim Muri <irumrj@...>
                    To: "columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com" <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 12:20 PM
                    Subject: Re: Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

                    Don't succumb to the temptation to overengineer solutions to simple problems, folks.

                    Water is potable if it is free of poisonous life and toxins.  It is palatable if it is free of odd flavors and smells and mysterious chunks.  So the approach is to get a few clean rags and / or a high pressure hose, swab out the tanks, pour in REAL hot water (150 degrees or hotter) and slosh it around good, then swab again, and keep doing that until you've glommed out as much crud as you can.  Don't expect to get it all.  Then you re-install the tank, install a particulate filter (more accurately, a strainer) and then, between the particulate strainer  and your spigots, a carbon filter.  Those two will remove chunks and filter out any residual chlorine, chemicals, most metals, toxins, and smells / flavors.  Then treat with Clorox (plain, ordinary, no frills Clorox or its generic equivalents available at Walmart and other places) and add your water.  Every time you refill your tank after that, add the appropriate amount of Clorox first.  Then don't worry about bugs, because the Clorox takes care of them.  After refilling and before you use this water, leave the fill port open for at least a half hour to allow some of the chlorine fumes to escape.  You can get everything you need for this at Walmart.

                    Yes, in a previous lifetime I held certification as a water quality specialist.

                    Yes, there are other ways to deal with this, including reverse osmosis, UV light systems, etc.  most of which are bigger buck solutions and prone to being difficult to keep working.  Clorox works every time it's tried.  Follow the directions provided in the link above and you'll stay healthy and your water will taste good and not add disturbing material to your bourbon and branch after-supper cocktails.

                    Yes, there are 'pills' that can be added to water to treat it for bugs.  They will work, but they will still require the filters mentioned above and are about three orders of magnitude more expensive per gallon than the method outlined above.

                    One last note:  chlorine (Clorox) is corrosive.  Don't let freshly treated water get on the hose clamps or other metal items in or near your plumbing systems.     
                     

                    From: "petemalone@..." <petemalone@...>
                    To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 10:01 AM
                    Subject: RE: Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

                     


                    --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    The plan was to have them steam cleaned then treat with Clorox followed
                    by testing. Still having trouble finding a steam cleaner...

                    Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                    Freelance Boating Writer
                    www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                    www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                    www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley

                    On 9/20/2013 1:44 PM, Richard Dondero wrote:
                    > Paul,
                    > You might want to try a 10% Clorox solution. If you are planning on
                    > using the water for drinking either after steam or Clorox treatment I
                    > would have the water tested after being in the tank for a day or so.
                    > In fact, before I drank from those tanks, I would do both, but again I
                    > am a biologist......
                    > Richard
                    >
                    > *From:* Paul Esterle <pesterle@...>
                    > *To:* columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                    > *Sent:* Friday, September 20, 2013 1:14 PM
                    > *Subject:* Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks [1 Attachment]
                    >
                    > Roto molded plastic....
                    >
                    > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                    > Freelance Boating Writer
                    > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                    > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                    > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
                    >
                    > On 9/19/2013 7:00 PM, petemalone@...
                    > <mailto:petemalone@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Not specifically a steam cleaner, but I am curious and would like to
                    > > ask a question, if you don't mind.
                    > >
                    > > I am wondering what material they are made from?
                    > >
                    > > ~ pete
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                    > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>,
                    > > <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                    > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Okay, I got the two center line water tanks out of my 10.7. They had
                    > > been disconnected and unused since before I bought the boat.
                    > > Unfortunately, they both have several gallons of about the nastiest
                    > > water in them you have ever seen. I trying to find someone at the head
                    > > of the bay to steam clean them. Anybody know of anyone?
                    > >
                    > > --
                    > > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                    > > Freelance Boating Writer
                    > > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                    > > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                    > > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Columbia Yacht Owners Association Website:
                    > http://www.columbia-yachts.com/
                    >
                    > Home:
                    > http://www.egroups.com/group/columbiasailingyachts/
                    >
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                    >




                  • Harry James
                    The previous one made it to my in box.Who know the twists and turns of the new Yahoo. HJ
                    Message 9 of 16 , Sep 22, 2013
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                      The previous one made it to my in box.Who know the twists and turns of the new Yahoo.

                      HJ


                      On 9/22/2013 5:57 PM, Jim Muri wrote:
                      For some reason, this message didn't get posted to the forum, so I'm sending it again.
                       
                      ----- Forwarded Message -----
                      From: Jim Muri <irumrj@...>
                      To: "columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com" <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 12:20 PM
                      Subject: Re: Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

                      Don't succumb to the temptation to overengineer solutions to simple problems, folks.

                      Water is potable if it is free of poisonous life and toxins.  It is palatable if it is free of odd flavors and smells and mysterious chunks.  So the approach is to get a few clean rags and / or a high pressure hose, swab out the tanks, pour in REAL hot water (150 degrees or hotter) and slosh it around good, then swab again, and keep doing that until you've glommed out as much crud as you can.  Don't expect to get it all.  Then you re-install the tank, install a particulate filter (more accurately, a strainer) and then, between the particulate strainer  and your spigots, a carbon filter.  Those two will remove chunks and filter out any residual chlorine, chemicals, most metals, toxins, and smells / flavors.  Then treat with Clorox (plain, ordinary, no frills Clorox or its generic equivalents available at Walmart and other places) and add your water.  Every time you refill your tank after that, add the appropriate amount of Clorox first.  Then don't worry about bugs, because the Clorox takes care of them.  After refilling and before you use this water, leave the fill port open for at least a half hour to allow some of the chlorine fumes to escape.  You can get everything you need for this at Walmart.

                      Yes, in a previous lifetime I held certification as a water quality specialist.

                      Yes, there are other ways to deal with this, including reverse osmosis, UV light systems, etc.  most of which are bigger buck solutions and prone to being difficult to keep working.  Clorox works every time it's tried.  Follow the directions provided in the link above and you'll stay healthy and your water will taste good and not add disturbing material to your bourbon and branch after-supper cocktails.

                      Yes, there are 'pills' that can be added to water to treat it for bugs.  They will work, but they will still require the filters mentioned above and are about three orders of magnitude more expensive per gallon than the method outlined above.

                      One last note:  chlorine (Clorox) is corrosive.  Don't let freshly treated water get on the hose clamps or other metal items in or near your plumbing systems.     
                       

                      From: "petemalone@..." <petemalone@...>
                      To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2013 10:01 AM
                      Subject: RE: Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks

                       


                      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      The plan was to have them steam cleaned then treat with Clorox followed
                      by testing. Still having trouble finding a steam cleaner...

                      Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                      Freelance Boating Writer
                      www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                      www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                      www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley

                      On 9/20/2013 1:44 PM, Richard Dondero wrote:
                      > Paul,
                      > You might want to try a 10% Clorox solution. If you are planning on
                      > using the water for drinking either after steam or Clorox treatment I
                      > would have the water tested after being in the tank for a day or so.
                      > In fact, before I drank from those tanks, I would do both, but again I
                      > am a biologist......
                      > Richard
                      >
                      > *From:* Paul Esterle <pesterle@...>
                      > *To:* columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                      > *Sent:* Friday, September 20, 2013 1:14 PM
                      > *Subject:* Re: CYOA - RE: Cleaning Water Tanks [1 Attachment]
                      >
                      > Roto molded plastic....
                      >
                      > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                      > Freelance Boating Writer
                      > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                      > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                      > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
                      >
                      > On 9/19/2013 7:00 PM, petemalone@...
                      > <mailto:petemalone@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Not specifically a steam cleaner, but I am curious and would like to
                      > > ask a question, if you don't mind.
                      > >
                      > > I am wondering what material they are made from?
                      > >
                      > > ~ pete
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>,
                      > > <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Okay, I got the two center line water tanks out of my 10.7. They had
                      > > been disconnected and unused since before I bought the boat.
                      > > Unfortunately, they both have several gallons of about the nastiest
                      > > water in them you have ever seen. I trying to find someone at the head
                      > > of the bay to steam clean them. Anybody know of anyone?
                      > >
                      > > --
                      > > Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
                      > > Freelance Boating Writer
                      > > www.thevirtualboatyard.com
                      > > www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
                      > > www.lulu.com/spotlight/captnpauley
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Columbia Yacht Owners Association Website:
                      > http://www.columbia-yachts.com/
                      >
                      > Home:
                      > http://www.egroups.com/group/columbiasailingyachts/
                      >
                      > To Post a message, send it to: columbiasailingyachts@...
                      > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts@...>
                      >
                      > To Subscribe, send a message to:
                      > columbiasailingyachts-subscribe@...
                      > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-subscribe@...>
                      >
                      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                      > columbiasailingyachts-unsubscribe@...
                      > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-unsubscribe@...>! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      > columbiasailingyachts-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >





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