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RE: RE: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects

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  • patn44
    May I jump in here? My old boat ( 78 so 35 yrs) has survived 20+ yrs with me. I ve done probably 12 bottome jobs (and had a few done) over that time. I ve had
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 17, 2013
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      May I jump in here?  My old boat ('78 so 35 yrs) has survived 20+ yrs with me.  I've done probably 12 bottome jobs (and had a few done) over that time.  I've had the blister problem and did major repairs about 7 yrs ago.  They come back but fewer each time.  I figure at this time the bottom has been effectively stripped a spot at a time and refilled with epoxy.  In any old boat there is a limit to their life but it can be extended with care and maintenance.  I've had to rebuild and replace most of the hardware, engine, parts and esthetic components.  If I tallied up the cost I could have had a great new boat....except that I couldn't have afforded it all at once.  So a piece at a time is what most of us do. 

       

      I wouldn't do the BIG job on the decks.  If you are working like most you will find this will prevent you from sailing the boat.  It will sit in the yard accumulating costs and eating up your free time.  You'll get disgusted with it and sell it for a lot less than you've put into it. 

       

      As for the 8.3, Its a good boat.  That said, you would have to decide whether you are up to whatever repairs are needed.  I can tell you that the meter boats take a lot of punishment and neglect and 'keep on sailing'. 

       

      Boats are like houses, they require constant upkeep and 'investment' of time and money.  There is little return unless you are able to sail... and then the return is priceless. 

       

      Now do what your heart tells you. 



      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Pete, I might be in your situation soon. Looking at an 8.3 (to buy) that has been sitting in a slip for years w/o a hull scraping. Looks like the Aquarium of the Pacific tidal pool reef exhibit. So what's the track record for possible blisters? Some or "run the other way"? Btw, price less than 2k ("death forces sale")... 
      Dan
      Long Beach, Ca


      Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



      -------- Original message --------
      From: petemalone@...
      Date:
      To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects


       

       Harry,

      Thanks for the pointers, and showing your pictures. I will look for Eric's that you reference.

      Right now, no leaks (that I know about) under the toe rail. I am thinking the only places that could leak are the screw holes.

      So, if I go do a deck painting job, and then leaks appear, I'll be kicking my own butt.

      However, the amount of work is daunting, and I still have a job that uses most of my time.

      What has me wanting to do this is the tired paint (sprayed two-part by PO 12 years ago).

      In addition, there are fine cracks radiating from stanchion base holes.

      Thinking that I could strip all hardware and paint, then apply filler, followed by 6 or 8 oz cloth on side decks and top surface of cabin house. There have been so many holes made and filled in the cabin top, that I think the glass is needed to keep the rosettes from popping back through the new paint.

      But pulling up the toe rail has me shuddering. Basically, it would mean new headliner, too, which is not without need, but extends the time to a declared finishing point.

      I might try cutting the screws and nuts from below with a thin friction wheel.

      But I would also try your technique, of clearing the nuts and unscrewing. Sunday I was inspecting, and noticed a few screws where the Phillips indent was stripped, so ones like that would need drilling out the heads, or cutting from below. Actually, drilling the heads out may be my first choice for ALL of the screws.

      I prefer this type down-hand work for obvious reasons.

      Criminy, I may be trying to talk myself into this job......

      But, I may also reseal the stanchion bases and repaint, then if I have to take up toe rail later, part of the job will be done. Your comment about doing it in stages is valid approach for me in my circumstances, thanks. 

      Time to go to the salt mine....

      ~ pete 

       

       



      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <welshman@...> wrote:

      Pete

      Redoing the decks properly for watertite seal is a huge job especially if you are going to repaint. The average 30" sailboat has more than a hundred deck penetrations.  I have done it twice now. I am thinking that if you have a functional boat then you could do sections of rebedding and make it a less formidable job.

      As far as taping the joint goes I think it depends on the joint. On the Columbia 40/38 I deemed it essential before I could bring the boat to a rain forest. The toe rail covers the joint which is an overlap joint and with all the bolt holes it is almost impossible to seal without taping the joint. Eric did it on Pelago, check the Pelago Pages on the Col web site, its near the bottom on the listing on the left.

      There are pics throughout my rebuild web site on the deconstruction and retaping

      http://www.hjboats.com/columbia38/index.html

      Bottom of week 5, week 6

      I will attach 4 pics on the process

      HJ




      On 9/16/2013 5:43 AM, petemalone@... wrote:

      Pat,

      Reads like you are determined...lol

      Thinking along similar lines myself, trying to think like I can get winter projects to fit the time available.

      Making myself tired thinking about pulling up deck hardware to strip and paint the deck and cabin trunk.

      Like anything else, once it gets started, it becomes manageable, until then, thinking about work makes worry and takes energy, BUT planning is good for avoiding wasted effort, so there is a balance.

      After the fun begins, there is just living through the labor until you are done.

      To Anybody - How crazy does a DIY boat owner need to be to remove all of the toe rail in order to lay a ply of cloth over the existing deck? Do people do that, or is there a stopping point just shy of going that far? (like right along the toe rail?)

      ~ pete

       



      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

       Cleaned the green and black mold off the decks Sat and motored Bilikin down to the marina/yard on Sunday.  Ready for haul out.  She's been sitting and waiting patiently for a facelift.  Had the rebuild of the interior last fall.  The old Yanmar cranked right up and did me proud heading down the river.  Will get her sailing this fall or I'm going to die trying.  Finally sold the house two weeks ago so not the effort and money can go to the boat.  Then?  Cruising for a while. 



      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Yesterday we had a good painting session in on Oceanus. We put the final coat of Brightsides on the cabin top and the first coat on the water channels on the deck. One more coat on ! the water channels should do it. Then we can tape them off and start painting the non-skid.

      I made progress on some other projects as well and documented some of them in my blog with pictures here:

      I'm starting to understand why boat projects take at least three times as much time and twice the money you think they are going to. It's stuff. Finding the right stuff and then paying twice what it's really worth.

      Brandon
      SV Oceanus, C-43
      Newport, Ore.

    • gr8wi9
      I agree about not doing the big job. If I had been faced with doing the toerail job, I would have just said let it leak. Maybe put a dehumidifier in. The
      Message 2 of 16 , Sep 18, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I agree about not doing the big job. If I had been faced with doing the toerail job, I would have just said let it leak. Maybe put a dehumidifier in. The 8.7 is fiberglass there anyway so maybe run a bead of something on the inside to keep most of the water out. It was more than enough to fix soft areas in the deck with injected epoxy, then painting it. It looks very nice now. Even so, we still haven't finished the headliner job that came along with doing the other repairs. When it's more work than fun, it sucks the spirit out of the endeavor.

        Jim
        C-8.7 Penny Lane
        Waukegan Harbor, IL
      • Richard Dondero
        Pat,   Your e mail gets right to the point and I agree with it.   My wife and I have been restoring/rebuilding a 1967 34 ft Columbia sailboat for a number
        Message 3 of 16 , Sep 18, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Pat,
            Your e mail gets right to the point and I agree with it.
           
          My wife and I have been restoring/rebuilding a 1967 34 ft Columbia sailboat for a number of years now and you are all too right about sacrificing sailing time to work on the boat, along with the cost of storing the boat at a boatyard.
           
          Part of our problem is we veered from our original plan just to get the boat into sailing condition to a  complete restoration project.
          However, I think we finally got on the right path and are going to have the topside professionally painted. It is just time to sail! We reviewed cost of the job vs our time and possibly  longer storage cost and decided to have others do it.
           
          But you touched on an important point, free time, since the boat is 2 hrs away in another state we have burned up too much free time over the years working on the boat and that is becoming an issue.
           
          Richard
          From: "patn44@..." <patn44@...>
          To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2013 8:11 PM
          Subject: RE: RE: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects



          May I jump in here?  My old boat ('78 so 35 yrs) has survived 20+ yrs with me.  I've done probably 12 bottome jobs (and had a few done) over that time.  I've had the blister problem and did major repairs about 7 yrs ago.  They come back but fewer each time.  I figure at this time the bottom has been effectively stripped a spot at a time and refilled with epoxy.  In any old boat there is a limit to their life but it can be extended with care and maintenance.  I've had to rebuild and replace most of the hardware, engine, parts and esthetic components.  If I tallied up the cost I could have had a great new boat....except that I couldn't have afforded it all at once.  So a piece at a time is what most of us do. 
           
          I wouldn't do the BIG job on the decks.  If you are working like most you will find this will prevent you from sailing the boat.  It will sit in the yard accumulating costs and eating up your free time.  You'll get disgusted with it and sell it for a lot less than you've put into it. 
           
          As for the 8.3, Its a good boat.  That said, you would have to decide whether you are up to whatever repairs are needed.  I can tell you that the meter boats take a lot of punishment and neglect and 'keep on sailing'. 
           
          Boats are like houses, they require constant upkeep and 'investment' of time and money.  There is little return unless you are able to sail... and then the return is priceless. 
           
          Now do what your heart tells you. 




        • Dan Oliver
          Hi Pat, I took a pass on the cheap 8.3.... From the waterline up it looked ok, no deck delamination or soft spots, standing rigging shot, but the boat had
          Message 4 of 16 , Sep 18, 2013
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            Hi Pat, I took a pass on the "cheap" 8.3.... From the waterline up it looked ok, no deck delamination or soft spots, standing rigging shot, but the boat had been in a slip, marine, without the bottom scraped for at least 5years and the bottom paint was 8-9 years old. I've done bottom jobs: barrier coats and  blister repairs, but I had to walk away on this one. Still looking though, it's selling season, bargains are out there, an 8.3 or 8.7 in my future.......
            Dan 
            Long Beach, Ca


            Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



            -------- Original message --------
            From: patn44@...
            Date:
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: RE: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects


             

            May I jump in here?  My old boat ('78 so 35 yrs) has survived 20+ yrs with me.  I've done probably 12 bottome jobs (and had a few done) over that time.  I've had the blister problem and did major repairs about 7 yrs ago.  They come back but fewer each time.  I figure at this time the bottom has been effectively stripped a spot at a time and refilled with epoxy.  In any old boat there is a limit to their life but it can be extended with care and maintenance.  I've had to rebuild and replace most of the hardware, engine, parts and esthetic components.  If I tallied up the cost I could have had a great new boat....except that I couldn't have afforded it all at once.  So a piece at a time is what most of us do. 

             

            I wouldn't do the BIG job on the decks.  If you are working like most you will find this will prevent you from sailing the boat.  It will sit in the yard accumulating costs and eating up your free time.  You'll get disgusted with it and sell it for a lot less than you've put into it. 

             

            As for the 8.3, Its a good boat.  That said, you would have to decide whether you are up to whatever repairs are needed.  I can tell you that the meter boats take a lot of punishment and neglect and 'keep on sailing'. 

             

            Boats are like houses, they require constant upkeep and 'investment' of time and money.  There is little return unless you are able to sail... and then the return is priceless. 

             

            Now do what your heart tells you. 



            --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            Pete, I might be in your situation soon. Looking at an 8.3 (to buy) that has been sitting in a slip for years w/o a hull scraping. Looks like the Aquarium of the Pacific tidal pool reef exhibit. So what's the track record for possible blisters? Some or "run the other way"? Btw, price less than 2k ("death forces sale")... 
            Dan
            Long Beach, Ca


            Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



            -------- Original message --------
            From: petemalone@...
            Date:
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects


             

             Harry,

            Thanks for the pointers, and showing your pictures. I will look for Eric's that you reference.

            Right now, no leaks (that I know about) under the toe rail. I am thinking the only places that could leak are the screw holes.

            So, if I go do a deck painting job, and then leaks appear, I'll be kicking my own butt.

            However, the amount of work is daunting, and I still have a job that uses most of my time.

            What has me wanting to do this is the tired paint (sprayed two-part by PO 12 years ago).

            In addition, there are fine cracks radiating from stanchion base holes.

            Thinking that I could strip all hardware and paint, then apply filler, followed by 6 or 8 oz cloth on side decks and top surface of cabin house. There have been so many holes made and filled in the cabin top, that I think the glass is needed to keep the rosettes from popping back through the new paint.

            But pulling up the toe rail has me shuddering. Basically, it would mean new headliner, too, which is not without need, but extends the time to a declared finishing point.

            I might try cutting the screws and nuts from below with a thin friction wheel.

            But I would also try your technique, of clearing the nuts and unscrewing. Sunday I was inspecting, and noticed a few screws where the Phillips indent was stripped, so ones like that would need drilling out the heads, or cutting from below. Actually, drilling the heads out may be my first choice for ALL of the screws.

            I prefer this type down-hand work for obvious reasons.

            Criminy, I may be trying to talk myself into this job......

            But, I may also reseal the stanchion bases and repaint, then if I have to take up toe rail later, part of the job will be done. Your comment about doing it in stages is valid approach for me in my circumstances, thanks. 

            Time to go to the salt mine....

            ~ pete 

             

             



            --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <welshman@...> wrote:

            Pete

            Redoing the decks properly for watertite seal is a huge job especially if you are going to repaint. The average 30" sailboat has more than a hundred deck penetrations.  I have done it twice now. I am thinking that if you have a functional boat then you could do sections of rebedding and make it a less formidable job.

            As far as taping the joint goes I think it depends on the joint. On the Columbia 40/38 I deemed it essential before I could bring the boat to a rain forest. The toe rail covers the joint which is an overlap joint and with all the bolt holes it is almost impossible to seal without taping the joint. Eric did it on Pelago, check the Pelago Pages on the Col web site, its near the bottom on the listing on the left.

            There are pics throughout my rebuild web site on the deconstruction and retaping

            http://www.hjboats.com/columbia38/index.html

            Bottom of week 5, week 6

            I will attach 4 pics on the process

            HJ




            On 9/16/2013 5:43 AM, petemalone@... wrote:

            Pat,

            Reads like you are determined...lol

            Thinking along similar lines myself, trying to think like I can get winter projects to fit the time available.

            Making myself tired thinking about pulling up deck hardware to strip and paint the deck and cabin trunk.

            Like anything else, once it gets started, it becomes manageable, until then, thinking about work makes worry and takes energy, BUT planning is good for avoiding wasted effort, so there is a balance.

            After the fun begins, there is just living through the labor until you are done.

            To Anybody - How crazy does a DIY boat owner need to be to remove all of the toe rail in order to lay a ply of cloth over the existing deck? Do people do that, or is there a stopping point just shy of going that far? (like right along the toe rail?)

            ~ pete

             



            --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

             Cleaned the green and black mold off the decks Sat and motored Bilikin down to the marina/yard on Sunday.  Ready for haul out.  She's been sitting and waiting patiently for a facelift.  Had the rebuild of the interior last fall.  The old Yanmar cranked right up and did me proud heading down the river.  Will get her sailing this fall or I'm going to die trying.  Finally sold the house two weeks ago so not the effort and money can go to the boat.  Then?  Cruising for a while. 



            --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

            Yesterday we had a good painting session in on Oceanus. We put the final coat of Brightsides on the cabin top and the first coat on the water channels on the deck. One more coat on ! the water channels should do it. Then we can tape them off and start painting the non-skid.

            I made progress on some other projects as well and documented some of them in my blog with pictures here:

            I'm starting to understand why boat projects take at least three times as much time and twice the money you think they are going to. It's stuff. Finding the right stuff and then paying twice what it's really worth.

            Brandon
            SV Oceanus, C-43
            Newport, Ore.

          • pajama1lama
            Thanks for the sane talk, Richard. AND Pat s advice to follow one s heart is HUA. It is really important to get heartfelt fulfillment from the hard chores,
            Message 5 of 16 , Sep 18, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              Thanks for the sane talk, Richard.

              AND Pat's advice to follow one's heart is HUA.

              It is really important to get heartfelt fulfillment from the hard chores, too, lest one weakens and gives in and retreats to the comfort of not finishing the job....

              I have thought through how to split this up into workable sections (Harry's comment), so I don't bite off the whole thing at once, and I can get started in a way that doesn't ruin next sailing season.

              So, cabin top first, to prevent wet core and in order to have a clean, non-chalky top deck!!

              ~ pete

                 



              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              Pat,
                Your e mail gets right to the point and I agree with it.
               
              My wife and I have been restoring/rebuilding a 1967 34 ft Columbia sailboat for a number of years now and you are all too right about sacrificing sailing time to work on the boat, along with the cost of storing the boat at a boatyard.
               
              Part of our problem is we veered from our original plan just to get the boat into sailing condition to a  complete restoration project.
              However, I think we finally got on the right path and are going to have the topside professionally painted. It is just time to sail! We reviewed cost of the job vs our time and possibly  longer storage cost and decided to have others do it.
               
              But you touched on an important point, free time, since the boat is 2 hrs away in another state we have burned up too much free time over the years working on the boat and that is becoming an issue.
               
              Richard
              From: "patn44@..." <patn44@...>
              To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2013 8:11 PM
              Subject: RE: RE: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects



              May I jump in here?  My old boat ('78 so 35 yrs) has survived 20+ yrs with me.  I've done probably 12 bottome jobs (and had a few done) over that time.  I've had the blister problem and did major repairs about 7 yrs ago.  They come back but fewer each time.  I figure at this time the bottom has been effectively stripped a spot at a time and refilled with epoxy.  In any old boat there is a limit to their life but it can be extended with care and maintenance.  I've had to rebuild and replace most of the hardware, engine, parts and esthetic components.  If I tallied up the cost I could have had a great new boat....except that I couldn't have afforded it all at once.  So a piece at a time is what most of us do. 
               
              I wouldn't do the BIG job on the decks.  If you are working like most you will find this will prevent you from sailing the boat.  It will sit in the yard accumulating costs and eating up your free time.  You'll get disgusted with it and sell it for a lot less than you've put into it. 
               
              As for the 8.3, Its a good boat.  That said, you would have to decide whether you are up to whatever repairs are needed.  I can tell you that the meter boats take a lot of punishment and neglect and 'keep on sailing'. 
               
              Boats are like houses, they require constant upkeep and 'investment' of time and money.  There is little return unless you are able to sail... and then the return is priceless. 
               
              Now do what your heart tells you. 


              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              Pete, I might be in your situation soon. Looking at an 8.3 (to buy) that has been sitting in a slip for years w/o a hull scraping. Looks like the Aquarium of the Pacific tidal pool reef exhibit. So what's the track record for possible blisters? Some or "run the other way"? Btw, price less than 2k ("death forces sale")... 
              Dan
              Long Beach, Ca


              Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone



              -------- Original message --------
              From: petemalone@...
              Date:
              To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: CYOA - RE: Painting and other projects


               
               Harry,
              Thanks for the pointers, and showing your pictures. I will look for Eric's that you reference.
              Right now, no leaks (that I know about) under the toe rail. I am thinking the only places that could leak are the screw holes.
              So, if I go do a deck painting job, and then leaks appear, I'll be kicking my own butt.
              However, the amount of work is daunting, and I still have a job that uses most of my time.
              What has me wanting to do this is the tired paint (sprayed two-part by PO 12 years ago).
              In addition, there are fine cracks radiating from stanchion base holes.
              Thinking that I could strip all hardware and paint, then apply filler, followed by 6 or 8 oz cloth on side decks and top surface of cabin house. There have been so many holes made and filled in the cabin top, that I think the glass is needed to keep the rosettes from popping back through the new paint.
              But pulling up the toe rail has me shuddering. Basically, it would mean new headliner, too, which is not without need, but extends the time to a declared finishing point.
              I might try cutting the screws and nuts from below with a thin friction wheel.
              But I would also try your technique, of clearing the nuts and unscrewing. Sunday I was inspecting, and noticed a few screws where the Phillips indent was stripped, so ones like that would need drilling out the heads, or cutting from below. Actually, drilling the heads out may be my first choice for ALL of the screws.
              I prefer this type down-hand work for obvious reasons.
              Criminy, I may be trying to talk myself into this job......
              But, I may also reseal the stanchion bases and repaint, then if I have to take up toe rail later, part of the job will be done. Your comment about doing it in stages is valid approach for me in my circumstances, thanks. 
              Time to go to the salt mine....
              ~ pete 
               
               


              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <welshman@...> wrote:

              Pete

              Redoing the decks properly for watertite seal is a huge job especially if you are going to repaint. The average 30" sailboat has more than a hundred deck penetrations.  I have done it twice now. I am thinking that if you have a functional boat then you could do sections of rebedding and make it a less formidable job.

              As far as taping the joint goes I think it depends on the joint. On the Columbia 40/38 I deemed it essential before I could bring the boat to a rain forest. The toe rail covers the joint which is an overlap joint and with all the bolt holes it is almost impossible to seal without taping the joint. Eric did it on Pelago, check the Pelago Pages on the Col web site, its near the bottom on the listing on the left.

              There are pics throughout my rebuild web site on the deconstruction and retaping

              http://www.hjboats.com/columbia38/index.html

              Bottom of week 5, week 6

              I will attach 4 pics on the process

              HJ




              On 9/16/2013 5:43 AM, petemalone@... wrote:
              Pat,
              Reads like you are determined...lol
              Thinking along similar lines myself, trying to think like I can get winter projects to fit the time available.
              Making myself tired thinking about pulling up deck hardware to strip and paint the deck and cabin trunk.
              Like anything else, once it gets started, it becomes manageable, until then, thinking about work makes worry and takes energy, BUT planning is good for avoiding wasted effort, so there is a balance.
              After the fun begins, there is just living through the labor until you are done.
              To Anybody - How crazy does a DIY boat owner need to be to remove all of the toe rail in order to lay a ply of cloth over the existing deck? Do people do that, or is there a stopping point just shy of going that far? (like right along the toe rail?)
              ~ pete
               


              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com wrote:

               Cleaned the green and black mold off the decks Sat and motored Bilikin down to the marina/yard on Sunday.  Ready for haul out.  She's been sitting and waiting patiently for a facelift.  Had the rebuild of the interior last fall.  The old Yanmar cranked right up and did me proud heading down the river.  Will get her sailing this fall or I'm going to die trying.  Finally sold the house two weeks ago so not the effort and money can go to the boat.  Then?  Cruising for a while. 


              --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com wrote:

              Yesterday we had a good painting session in on Oceanus. We put the final coat of Brightsides on the cabin top and the first coat on the water channels on the deck. One more coat on ! the water channels should do it. Then we can tape them off and start painting the non-skid.

              I made progress on some other projects as well and documented some of them in my blog with pictures here:

              I'm starting to understand why boat projects take at least three times as much time and twice the money you think they are going to. It's stuff. Finding the right stuff and then paying twice what it's really worth.

              Brandon
              SV Oceanus, C-43
              Newport, Ore.





            • gr8wi9
              You are exactly where we were. We wanted to fix the chalky old gelcoat and tired non-skid. We have a friend who is a surveyor so we asked her to take a look
              Message 6 of 16 , Sep 18, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                You are exactly where we were. We wanted to fix the chalky old gelcoat and tired non-skid. We have a friend who is a surveyor so we asked her to take a look before we started prepping for paint. She found soft spots in the deck. So that turned into a huge project by itself. Finally we painted the smooth places with Brightsides and the non-skid with Kiwigrip (after hours of prep and sanding and epoxy primer). It looks great now. Kiwigrip is pretty flexible so we are hopeful it will take care of the spider crazing we found in some spots. Plus it was primered with penetrating epoxy. I did find a leaky stanchion this season, but it's really no problem since the 8.7 is solid fiberglass in those areas. I'll re-bed them with butyl tape in the off season.

                Jim
              • patn44
                Sooooo... third day of sanding the hull. Got a lot more done yesterday as the temps were less and the breeze was steady. The heat here in the tropics (south
                Message 7 of 16 , Sep 19, 2013
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                   Sooooo... third day of sanding the hull.  Got a lot more done yesterday as the temps were less and the breeze was steady.  The heat here in the tropics (south Alabama) saps my strength.  No I won't admit I'm getting too old for this, but don't think I'll do it again in this life time.  I'm playing with a different color for the hull.  I love the dark blue but know that any little scratch will show.  White is so common but doesn't show wear/dirt as badly (and.... in a race the committee boat can't immediately identify which boat is over early).  I'd like something light light turquoise, like I see on the power boats.  As I'm sanding I find the original hull was a cream color rather than white.  Also am finding that the 'professional' painters that did the job after Katrina left a lot of bubbles and I'm having to sand more to get rid of them.  The rubbing the boat took against the piers last year in our little hurricane have peeled paint off one side.  She's going to look beautiful again when I'm done though.  (Not doing the bottom, don't want to be under there with barnacles and old paint falling on my head).  Learning my limits?  Want to go SAILING! 



                  --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, <columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  You are exactly where we were. We wanted to fix the chalky old gelcoat and tired non-skid. We have a friend who is a surveyor so we asked her to take a look before we started prepping for paint. She found soft spots in the deck. So that turned into a huge project by itself. Finally we painted the smooth places with Brightsides and the non-skid with Kiwigrip (after hours of prep and sanding and epoxy primer). It looks great now. Kiwigrip is pretty flexible so we are hopeful it will take care of the spider crazing we found in some spots. Plus it was primered with penetrating epoxy. I did find a leaky stanchion this season, but it's really no problem since the 8.7 is solid fiberglass in those areas. I'll re-bed them with butyl tape in the off season.

                  Jim
                • cchl74
                  If the toe rail is not leaking too much, you can try the stucco sealer trick. Some have found that that works. It s the same stuff as the Capt.n Tollys Miracle
                  Message 8 of 16 , Sep 19, 2013
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                    If the toe rail is not leaking too much, you can try the stucco sealer trick. Some have found that that works. It's the same stuff as the Capt.n Tollys Miracle Crack Repair, but a loot cheaper.


                          Bruce K
                          Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                          Los Lunas, NM 




                    I agree about not doing the big job. If I had been faced with doing the toerail job, I would have just said let it leak. Maybe put a dehumidifier in. The 8.7 is fiberglass there anyway so maybe run a bead of something on the inside to keep most of the water out. It was more than enough to fix soft areas in the deck with injected epoxy, then painting it. It looks very nice now. Even so, we still haven't finished the headliner job that came along with doing the other repairs. When it's more work than fun, it sucks the spirit out of the endeavor.

                    Jim
                    C-8.7 Penny Lane
                    Waukegan Harbor, IL

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