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Re: CYOA - Re: Cockpit Scupper Questions and a Re-Fit Update - Long

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  • Lance Como
    It s been interesting to see what you ve been up to with your C26 MK I... I too have one: hull 279 which is for sale. I ve priced it high mainly because I feel
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 20, 2013
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      It's been interesting to see what you've been up to with your C26 MK I... I too have one: hull 279 which is for sale. I've priced it high mainly because I feel the boat is worth every penny.

      Some interesting notes about my boat: the cabin top has been completely rebuilt with an aircraft foam core—it has been cut down 3-1/2 inches to reduced windage and all ports have been replaced plus it has aircraft style storage built in along the salon top (which also functions as interior grab rail). The salon has four opening portlights and the forward cabins are deadlights—all new.

      The toe rail is custom fitted mahogany and all hatches have been renewed in fiberglass... it has two inner shrouds with one original outboard. The interior was rebuilt with a ton of custom storage compartments and the bilge is as clean as when it came out of the factory.

      I've had a number of potential buyers wanting to take a look at her, but I've held them off until I recoat the non-skid (KiwiGrip) and do some minor touch up painting on the deck. All of the exterior brightwork has been refinished using Deks Olje D1. It's really looking great and the complements I'm getting put a smile on my face to say the least.

      It has an Atomic 4 which runs like a Swiss watch and a full complement of sails with an inner forestay for heavy weather (storm/trysail).

      I've had people come down who own beautiful boats (Hallberg Rassy, Westsail 32, Pacific Seacrafts to name a few) come to look over my boat and are very impressed... especially with the cabin modifications and toe rails. The man who did the work was truly an artist and a master at fiberglass construction.

      She is a very unique craft capable of handling just about anything Lake Superior can throw at her. If it weren't for the fact I'm in the process of picking up a Grand Banks 32 I'd not even consider selling her... in fact I'm thinking of keeping it on Lake Superior for a summer retreat (I'm looking to relocate on a live-aboard further south since the MN winters are getting the best of me.

      I spoke with the previous owners wife (he passed away 67 years ago and the boat was in storage until I bought it in 2011)... she told they raced it often and took many first place finishes—the boat is surprisingly fast... I can maintain 7.5+ MPH with modest wind. One fellow on the dock is very familiar with the C26 MK I and told me they carry a lot of sail for their size and in their day were considered very capable racers.

      I'll keep watching for your progress reports... best of luck getting your C26 MK I back in to shape. With not much more work mine will be as good or better than the day it came out of the factory.

      Lance

      P.S. if your interested I have some information on the boat on my website (many images are from when I first purchased it so they don't show the new coatings):



      On Jun 19, 2013, at 5:58 PM, c26_mki_sail93 wrote:

       


      6 hours of rasping/fine chisel work and I can actually see the results of the hull-to-deck joint sealing/repair. Looks stellar, and at this rate the boat will have to have SERIOUS impact damage to ever make me question the seam again, or ever wonder if its the genesis of a latent drip. The G-flex that wasn't thickened was super easy to get off un-prepped surfaces (ie gel coat) but was exceptionally well bonded to the exposed glass in an on the flange. The thickened stuff (used some appropriate West stuff to mix up a thicker bead in areas) was harder to remove, hence the rasp. A few spots to go back to with a little shot here or there, but overall I'm exceptionally pleased with the result. Problem spot = fixed, and fixed right, for another 50 years...
      Wahoo!
      (It's the little successes that keep these projects going forward...)

      - C26 MKI, #93

      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "c26_mki_sail93" <jakeweld@...> wrote:
      >
      > The refit on C26 MKI #93 has made significant progress in the past two
      > weeks. I'll chronicle what's been completed, and what's planned, below
      > - but I do have some questions about Cockpit Scuppers:
      >
      > The cockpit floor angles forward and drains to a single (grossly)
      > undersized cockpit scupper, which then passes to a hose and out a
      > thru-hull directly beneath it. Many folks talk about two (port and
      > starboard) and then cross the lines - I only have one, and clearly there
      > was never a second to begin with, so no crossed lines. One potentially
      > "easy" solution would be to upsize the current thru-hull and scupper,
      > add a second, cross my two lines, and be "OK". BUT - I don't like the
      > thru-hulls at all, and am trying to come up with a solution which gets
      > the water out of the cock pit (both rain or being pooped), and
      > eliminates holes below the water line. The MKI 26 has a huge motor well
      > - and if I can get the water into there, I can worry less about the boat
      > itself...
      >
      > Potential Ideas:
      >
      > (Note - most of these ideas are predicated on the fact that the motor
      > well will be FULLY glassed in/out, effectively creating a "false
      > transom" out of the motor-well/cockpit bulkhead).
      >
      > 1 - Add an additional scupper in the forward of the cockpit well, but
      > run the exit tubes all the way back, and then through the aft bulk-head
      > (glassed in) to void them into the motor well. I don't know if I can
      > get enough rise (decline) on the run...
      >
      > 2 - Glass in the existing system, glass in a new floor (I'd keep the
      > existing one, but just build a new one over it) which angles back
      > towards the transom (ending the new incline just forward of the rudder
      > post) and drain the cockpit through the motor well using something like
      > this
      > http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=U\
      > SBS&Product_Code=SCP18281&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains
      > <http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=\
      > USBS&Product_Code=SCP18281&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains > or this
      > http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=U\
      > SBS&Product_Code=SCP18261&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains
      > <http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=\
      > USBS&Product_Code=SCP18261&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains>
      >
      > 3 - Simply accept a few ounces of water in the forward part of the
      > cockpit sole (kinda yuck...), but put scuppers in the aft bulkhead which
      > then drains any water which hits them out to the motor well.
      >
      > Something else...???
      >
      > Also - I have two very small "drain holes" that are drilled through the
      > boat JUST aft of the bulkhead (and therefore JUST inside the motor well,
      > but at its lowest point). Don't know if these were to aid in storage,
      > and were intended for plugging later, but they are VERY close to, or at,
      > the waterline as its indicated from the paint job. That said, a larger
      > hole (which won't be clogged by belly-button lint, as the current ones
      > are), just forward of the base of the interior motor mount, does make
      > sense to me... Make sense to anyone else...???
      >
      > This boat won't see the water until these issues are solved, so the "try
      > it to see how it works" answer doesn't really apply here... With almost
      > 800 of these made, hoping someone has a great solution out there...
      >
      > In the spirit of quid pro quo in the forums, I've tried to add some
      > updated information, which some of you may find useful.
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Recent Work Completed:
      >
      > - All top deck hardware removed - yes, ALL (stanchions, cleats, blocks,
      > chain plates, traveler, winches, old who-knows-what, cabin top
      > handrails, mast base, etc... - she looks naked!). Holes where there is
      > core were overdrilled, scraped (stupendously dry, but not dry-rotted,
      > core in there!), and re-filled with epoxy to create either permanent
      > fixes or glass plugs for re-bedding (with butyl tape). Top deck will be
      > repainted in the spring, so putting stuff back can wait until then.
      > That said, MUCH of it simply broke off under minimal wrench twisting -
      > lots of rotten bolts up there... Good to have it ready to be made safe.
      > If in doubt - check yours!
      >
      > - Toe rails removed (it is this unusual plastic lumber stuff - looks
      > like it was maybe Home Depot plastic decking? Or something else? Maybe
      > from Columbia?? Kinda cool - no rot, looks good enough - will
      > re-install). This toe rail was attached to the hull-to-deck joint via
      > self-tapping screws which went in horizontally (parallel to the water),
      > and probably created some water-penetration areas in the joint - will be
      > fixed by using butyl tape to re-set screws.
      >
      > -The hull-to-deck joint was fully inspected. FYI - it's an up-facing
      > flange, which was (or wasn't...) filled with various silicone-type
      > substances. It seems as though sometime in the last 50 years there has
      > been silicone, sikaflex, and 5200 pushed in there - all was pretty much
      > garbage. Original construction seems as though the joint was then
      > tabbed/taped from the bottom. This construction creates a void, so that
      > any water that could get in will run until it finds an exit (into the
      > boat).
      >
      > -The entire hull-to-deck joint was injected (small syringe) with G-Flex,
      > which has both incredibly strong holding power and up to 30% flex -
      > pretty cool stuff, and very easy to use. Ultimately, this potential
      > problem area was deemed sound, and the G-Flex makes it significantly
      > more so - good to go.
      >
      > -Of note is that the original mahogany toe rail (long gone on this boat)
      > had head sail tracks drilled straight through it - these holes were bet
      > found, and drilled, from the interior up, rather than top down.
      >
      > -Chain plates (6, but only 2 sunk into bulkheads) were removed. Great
      > news there, too - the bulkheads are strong, dry, and show no signs of
      > water intrusion. In fact, there was NO sign the bolts even working
      > around in the bulkhead - could still see the thread grooves! It's
      > possible these chain plates were upgrades, but even that could have been
      > 20 years ago - again, major "problem" area got a clean bill of health.
      >
      > - Mast base (interior and exterior) removed. The interior has a "soft"
      > arch which presses down-forces out to the full-stringers which runs the
      > beam of the boat. This wooden arch (maybe 2 1/2 times thick at the
      > center as the edges) was glassed in under the headliner. The headliner
      > was zip-cut out and the (rotten) wood arch was removed. Likely rotten
      > due to improper bedding of bolts which held the top-deck fitting in
      > place and/or water intrusion from mast electric). This interior arch
      > will be replaced with a fabricated G10 arch. Good to remove the old
      > stuff, but relatively "easy" to fix this, and ultimately, another
      > big-problem area that's now on it's way to a clean bill of health.
      >
      > Plans:
      >
      > -Forward facing window has been removed. Blasphemy that it is, this
      > area will be glassed in completely because I think the window is
      > destined to leak, and that leak will always cause problems. Other's
      > opinions aside, this window is gone, and will be glassed in within the
      > coming days. All of the windows leak on the boat (currently duct taped
      > in to slow down the rain!). I'm seriously thinking of 8 new opening
      > port lights from Bomar - which means that the big windows MAY also be
      > fully glassed in to create an acceptable mounting area for the new
      > windows (trending toward 8 12"x6" windows - sacrificing some light for
      > some air seems worth it...). Currently, I believe the headliner is
      > tight up against the deck at the windows, so I'm not worried about
      > having to cut out any headliner - but we'll see.
      >
      > - 1/4 berths have been removed. They will be replaced once I'm sure
      > water won't be coming in from the top, re-rotting them, or the cabin
      > sole, which will be cut out and replaced. I'd like to raise the
      > backrest a bit more, creating a better "bookshelf", and also bring the
      > backrests inboard a few inches, creating more space on that shelf.
      > Additionally, access ports will be cut into the backrests, creating
      > access to the previously closed-off storage area behind those lockers.
      >
      > -Previous configuration had a cowl vent for anchor chain/rode aft of the
      > bow mooring cleat, and aft of the forward chain-locker bulkhead. This
      > hull will be filled with G10, as will the rectangle where I had to cut
      > out the bow cleat. Still stewing on long-term solutions, but
      > considering making the forward-most bulkhead watertight, and raised well
      > above the water line with a small drain fitting, so that soggy rode can
      > seep out the bow but I don't have to sleep with algae... Will replace
      > top-deck fitting to a more water-tight chain pass, and mount the
      > anchor(s) on a roller (s) at the bow.
      >
      > -Thru hulls from the sink, and head (x2), will be removed and glassed
      > in. While I may think about replacing the sink/ice box one some day, my
      > short-term solution is a catch-basin piped in for grey-water and/or
      > melting ice which can then be discharged at my leisure. If I can get
      > her to NO thru-hulls, I'll be most happy - hence the scupper question
      > above...
      >
      > -Electrical needs to be re-installed - bits are good, but most has been
      > removed, and much needs re-wiring.
      >
      > -Cockpit lockers lead a lot - sieves, really. Port cocpit locker will
      > be fully glassed in/closed, creating an interior storage area for duffel
      > bags, sails, and all the crap that comes along, but should stay clean
      > and dry. Starboard cockpit locker will be fixed by a
      > yet-t0-be-determined method which will ensure proper draining, and end
      > water intrusion from above, and have a locking mechanism to keep it
      > closed in heavy seas.
      >
      > Bits and pieces - which never end, but that's enough for now...
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > C26 MKI,#93, 1964
      >



      ---
      Lance Como
      Como Consortium Ltd. WorldWide
      2933 Quail Avenue North
      Golden Valley, MN 55422
      USA

      763.521.5276    Office
      763.234.8008    Mobile
      612.677.3277    Fax
      800 730.6824    Toll-Free

      lance@...   E-mail
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      http://www.comoltd.com   Website

    • c26_mki_sail93
      Pete, Great reminders. Thanks! I ll keep chewing on it, and see if any inspiration comes my way... In the mean time, no rest for the wicked... Ground out
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 21, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Pete,

        Great reminders. Thanks! I'll keep chewing on it, and see if any inspiration comes my way...

        In the mean time, no rest for the wicked...

        Ground out (seriously messy 4 hours of grinding inside and out...) and prepped and filled with glass 7 major holes in the deck today (ie busted binnacle, old cowl vent, gas hose (!?), etc... ). Major prep work, lots of grindinglots of glass. Used 4-6 layers of 12oz glass set on the bottoms (well-oversized prep area) a layer of G10 (now there's a core that won't rot!), and 6-8 layers of glass on top (top was prepped with a 12:1 scarf ratio like a hull hole, bottom was prepped to about 5:1, but also both had a huge surrouding area of exposed/prepped glass for well-overlapped glass. Some thickened West was used to bring the whole thing "up to grade."
        Can't wait to see how they came out...!

        BTW - this boat is NOT balsa cored - there is nice, thick, hard plywood use as core - very substantial, even 50 years later...!

        --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Peter" <petemalone@...> wrote:
        >
        > Good, job, you deserve a break, so read along for a moment.
        > In your early post about scupper drains, you mention new drains to the motor well.
        > I did that on a C&C many years ago, and regretted it.
        > Reason was that even though I brought the drains out above LWL, and this was marginal to get slope for draining, the wave action at dock would pump water in faster through the drains than it could drain out under some conditions of wind and wave. What a pain!
        > I know, flappers, inverted traps all manner of accommodation might have helped, but no room for traps and flappers have moving parts, which says enough about inherent reliability, I think.
        > So, plan well, look at drain rates recommended by ABYC, and good luck....not wanting to discourage, just a reminder that unintended consequences bite.
        > ~ pete
        >
        >
        > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "c26_mki_sail93" <jakeweld@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > 6 hours of rasping/fine chisel work and I can actually see the results of the hull-to-deck joint sealing/repair. Looks stellar, and at this rate the boat will have to have SERIOUS impact damage to ever make me question the seam again, or ever wonder if its the genesis of a latent drip. The G-flex that wasn't thickened was super easy to get off un-prepped surfaces (ie gel coat) but was exceptionally well bonded to the exposed glass in an on the flange. The thickened stuff (used some appropriate West stuff to mix up a thicker bead in areas) was harder to remove, hence the rasp. A few spots to go back to with a little shot here or there, but overall I'm exceptionally pleased with the result. Problem spot = fixed, and fixed right, for another 50 years...
        > > Wahoo!
        > > (It's the little successes that keep these projects going forward...)
        > >
        > > - C26 MKI, #93
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "c26_mki_sail93" <jakeweld@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > The refit on C26 MKI #93 has made significant progress in the past two
        > > > weeks. I'll chronicle what's been completed, and what's planned, below
        > > > - but I do have some questions about Cockpit Scuppers:
        > > >
        > > > The cockpit floor angles forward and drains to a single (grossly)
        > > > undersized cockpit scupper, which then passes to a hose and out a
        > > > thru-hull directly beneath it. Many folks talk about two (port and
        > > > starboard) and then cross the lines - I only have one, and clearly there
        > > > was never a second to begin with, so no crossed lines. One potentially
        > > > "easy" solution would be to upsize the current thru-hull and scupper,
        > > > add a second, cross my two lines, and be "OK". BUT - I don't like the
        > > > thru-hulls at all, and am trying to come up with a solution which gets
        > > > the water out of the cock pit (both rain or being pooped), and
        > > > eliminates holes below the water line. The MKI 26 has a huge motor well
        > > > - and if I can get the water into there, I can worry less about the boat
        > > > itself...
        > > >
        > > > Potential Ideas:
        > > >
        > > > (Note - most of these ideas are predicated on the fact that the motor
        > > > well will be FULLY glassed in/out, effectively creating a "false
        > > > transom" out of the motor-well/cockpit bulkhead).
        > > >
        > > > 1 - Add an additional scupper in the forward of the cockpit well, but
        > > > run the exit tubes all the way back, and then through the aft bulk-head
        > > > (glassed in) to void them into the motor well. I don't know if I can
        > > > get enough rise (decline) on the run...
        > > >
        > > > 2 - Glass in the existing system, glass in a new floor (I'd keep the
        > > > existing one, but just build a new one over it) which angles back
        > > > towards the transom (ending the new incline just forward of the rudder
        > > > post) and drain the cockpit through the motor well using something like
        > > > this
        > > > http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=U\
        > > > SBS&Product_Code=SCP18281&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains
        > > > <http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=\
        > > > USBS&Product_Code=SCP18281&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains > or this
        > > > http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=U\
        > > > SBS&Product_Code=SCP18261&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains
        > > > <http://www.usboatsupplies.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=Shop2&Store_Code=\
        > > > USBS&Product_Code=SCP18261&Category_Code=ScuppersDrains>
        > > >
        > > > 3 - Simply accept a few ounces of water in the forward part of the
        > > > cockpit sole (kinda yuck...), but put scuppers in the aft bulkhead which
        > > > then drains any water which hits them out to the motor well.
        > > >
        > > > Something else...???
        > > >
        > > > Also - I have two very small "drain holes" that are drilled through the
        > > > boat JUST aft of the bulkhead (and therefore JUST inside the motor well,
        > > > but at its lowest point). Don't know if these were to aid in storage,
        > > > and were intended for plugging later, but they are VERY close to, or at,
        > > > the waterline as its indicated from the paint job. That said, a larger
        > > > hole (which won't be clogged by belly-button lint, as the current ones
        > > > are), just forward of the base of the interior motor mount, does make
        > > > sense to me... Make sense to anyone else...???
        > > >
        > > > This boat won't see the water until these issues are solved, so the "try
        > > > it to see how it works" answer doesn't really apply here... With almost
        > > > 800 of these made, hoping someone has a great solution out there...
        > > >
        > > > In the spirit of quid pro quo in the forums, I've tried to add some
        > > > updated information, which some of you may find useful.
        > > >
        > > > Thanks!
        > > >
        > > > Recent Work Completed:
        > > >
        > > > - All top deck hardware removed - yes, ALL (stanchions, cleats, blocks,
        > > > chain plates, traveler, winches, old who-knows-what, cabin top
        > > > handrails, mast base, etc... - she looks naked!). Holes where there is
        > > > core were overdrilled, scraped (stupendously dry, but not dry-rotted,
        > > > core in there!), and re-filled with epoxy to create either permanent
        > > > fixes or glass plugs for re-bedding (with butyl tape). Top deck will be
        > > > repainted in the spring, so putting stuff back can wait until then.
        > > > That said, MUCH of it simply broke off under minimal wrench twisting -
        > > > lots of rotten bolts up there... Good to have it ready to be made safe.
        > > > If in doubt - check yours!
        > > >
        > > > - Toe rails removed (it is this unusual plastic lumber stuff - looks
        > > > like it was maybe Home Depot plastic decking? Or something else? Maybe
        > > > from Columbia?? Kinda cool - no rot, looks good enough - will
        > > > re-install). This toe rail was attached to the hull-to-deck joint via
        > > > self-tapping screws which went in horizontally (parallel to the water),
        > > > and probably created some water-penetration areas in the joint - will be
        > > > fixed by using butyl tape to re-set screws.
        > > >
        > > > -The hull-to-deck joint was fully inspected. FYI - it's an up-facing
        > > > flange, which was (or wasn't...) filled with various silicone-type
        > > > substances. It seems as though sometime in the last 50 years there has
        > > > been silicone, sikaflex, and 5200 pushed in there - all was pretty much
        > > > garbage. Original construction seems as though the joint was then
        > > > tabbed/taped from the bottom. This construction creates a void, so that
        > > > any water that could get in will run until it finds an exit (into the
        > > > boat).
        > > >
        > > > -The entire hull-to-deck joint was injected (small syringe) with G-Flex,
        > > > which has both incredibly strong holding power and up to 30% flex -
        > > > pretty cool stuff, and very easy to use. Ultimately, this potential
        > > > problem area was deemed sound, and the G-Flex makes it significantly
        > > > more so - good to go.
        > > >
        > > > -Of note is that the original mahogany toe rail (long gone on this boat)
        > > > had head sail tracks drilled straight through it - these holes were bet
        > > > found, and drilled, from the interior up, rather than top down.
        > > >
        > > > -Chain plates (6, but only 2 sunk into bulkheads) were removed. Great
        > > > news there, too - the bulkheads are strong, dry, and show no signs of
        > > > water intrusion. In fact, there was NO sign the bolts even working
        > > > around in the bulkhead - could still see the thread grooves! It's
        > > > possible these chain plates were upgrades, but even that could have been
        > > > 20 years ago - again, major "problem" area got a clean bill of health.
        > > >
        > > > - Mast base (interior and exterior) removed. The interior has a "soft"
        > > > arch which presses down-forces out to the full-stringers which runs the
        > > > beam of the boat. This wooden arch (maybe 2 1/2 times thick at the
        > > > center as the edges) was glassed in under the headliner. The headliner
        > > > was zip-cut out and the (rotten) wood arch was removed. Likely rotten
        > > > due to improper bedding of bolts which held the top-deck fitting in
        > > > place and/or water intrusion from mast electric). This interior arch
        > > > will be replaced with a fabricated G10 arch. Good to remove the old
        > > > stuff, but relatively "easy" to fix this, and ultimately, another
        > > > big-problem area that's now on it's way to a clean bill of health.
        > > >
        > > > Plans:
        > > >
        > > > -Forward facing window has been removed. Blasphemy that it is, this
        > > > area will be glassed in completely because I think the window is
        > > > destined to leak, and that leak will always cause problems. Other's
        > > > opinions aside, this window is gone, and will be glassed in within the
        > > > coming days. All of the windows leak on the boat (currently duct taped
        > > > in to slow down the rain!). I'm seriously thinking of 8 new opening
        > > > port lights from Bomar - which means that the big windows MAY also be
        > > > fully glassed in to create an acceptable mounting area for the new
        > > > windows (trending toward 8 12"x6" windows - sacrificing some light for
        > > > some air seems worth it...). Currently, I believe the headliner is
        > > > tight up against the deck at the windows, so I'm not worried about
        > > > having to cut out any headliner - but we'll see.
        > > >
        > > > - 1/4 berths have been removed. They will be replaced once I'm sure
        > > > water won't be coming in from the top, re-rotting them, or the cabin
        > > > sole, which will be cut out and replaced. I'd like to raise the
        > > > backrest a bit more, creating a better "bookshelf", and also bring the
        > > > backrests inboard a few inches, creating more space on that shelf.
        > > > Additionally, access ports will be cut into the backrests, creating
        > > > access to the previously closed-off storage area behind those lockers.
        > > >
        > > > -Previous configuration had a cowl vent for anchor chain/rode aft of the
        > > > bow mooring cleat, and aft of the forward chain-locker bulkhead. This
        > > > hull will be filled with G10, as will the rectangle where I had to cut
        > > > out the bow cleat. Still stewing on long-term solutions, but
        > > > considering making the forward-most bulkhead watertight, and raised well
        > > > above the water line with a small drain fitting, so that soggy rode can
        > > > seep out the bow but I don't have to sleep with algae... Will replace
        > > > top-deck fitting to a more water-tight chain pass, and mount the
        > > > anchor(s) on a roller (s) at the bow.
        > > >
        > > > -Thru hulls from the sink, and head (x2), will be removed and glassed
        > > > in. While I may think about replacing the sink/ice box one some day, my
        > > > short-term solution is a catch-basin piped in for grey-water and/or
        > > > melting ice which can then be discharged at my leisure. If I can get
        > > > her to NO thru-hulls, I'll be most happy - hence the scupper question
        > > > above...
        > > >
        > > > -Electrical needs to be re-installed - bits are good, but most has been
        > > > removed, and much needs re-wiring.
        > > >
        > > > -Cockpit lockers lead a lot - sieves, really. Port cocpit locker will
        > > > be fully glassed in/closed, creating an interior storage area for duffel
        > > > bags, sails, and all the crap that comes along, but should stay clean
        > > > and dry. Starboard cockpit locker will be fixed by a
        > > > yet-t0-be-determined method which will ensure proper draining, and end
        > > > water intrusion from above, and have a locking mechanism to keep it
        > > > closed in heavy seas.
        > > >
        > > > Bits and pieces - which never end, but that's enough for now...
        > > >
        > > > Thanks!
        > > >
        > > > C26 MKI,#93, 1964
        > > >
        > >
        >
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