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RE: CYOA - Leaking metal gastank

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  • Jesse Doyle
    One of the guys suggested a spray in liner for it. Unless you want a true pain in the arse I wouldn’t remove it. First if yours is one of the earlier ones it
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 12, 2013
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      One of the guys suggested a spray in liner for it. Unless you want a true pain in the arse I wouldn’t remove it. First if yours is one of the earlier ones it is epoxied in with no less than an inch of epoxy and then try to find a tank that will work in your boat without doing a lot of cutting and remodeling. “I Know. I’ve got a 1970 28’ # 547.

      Jesse Doyle

      1971 Columbia 28’

      #547

      s/v Wind Singer

      Redwood City, Ca.

      37º 35’ 14.32” N

      122º 18’ 58.89” W

       

       

       

      From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sonia Hruska
      Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:26 AM
      To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: CYOA - Leaking metal gastank

       

       

      My Columbia 28 has the original gastank, it is rusted. What would be the cheapest most reliable fix?

    • Larry W
      The tank in my 8.7 is fouled with algae/trash. Rather than remove it, or clean it, I elected to use a 6 gallon outboard tank. It fits easily in the cockpit
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 12, 2013
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        The tank in my 8.7 is fouled with algae/trash. Rather than remove it, or clean it, I elected to use a 6 gallon outboard tank. It fits easily in the cockpit lazerette and is very accessible. There is room for two 5 gallon jerry cans so I have 16 gallons capacity, always have fresh diesel and can remove the tank for cleaning if needed. I shut off the petcock for the old tank, plugged the fuel line and ran the new line thru the add on primary filter.
        Larry Wilson
        Richmond,Va.

        --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Sonia Hruska" <soniahruska@...> wrote:
        >
        > My Columbia 28 has the original gastank, it is rusted. What would be the cheapest most reliable fix?
        >
      • Jim Muri
        A nimble and flexible youngster to go in there and get it out, then measuring it so that you can replace it w/ a plastic tank.   James R. Muri Novelist,
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 13, 2013
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          A nimble and flexible youngster to go in there and get it out, then measuring it so that you can replace it w/ a plastic tank.
           

          From: Sonia Hruska <soniahruska@...>
          To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:25 AM
          Subject: CYOA - Leaking metal gastank

           
          My Columbia 28 has the original gastank, it is rusted. What would be the cheapest most reliable fix?



        • Jesse Doyle
          Jim, that tank can’t be replaced with a pre-made plastic tank. I took mine out for that same reason that they have. A nimble person isn’t needed. Just hard
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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            Jim, that tank can’t be replaced with a pre-made plastic tank. I took mine out for that same reason that they have. A nimble person isn’t needed. Just hard work. Trust me, I have looked everywhere trying to find a tank to fit. Other than a nauti tank or something of that type you won’t find one to fit. Not unless you want to go with a three to five gallon tank. The problem with the tank in the earlier Columbia 28 is that it was made to fit in the port or starboard ¼ berth hold. There are no less than five to six different angles that make it impossible to get a pre-made to fit. Not trying to be difficult Jim. I’m just going on a pain in the arse experience. If I have to do it all over again I would have found a way to line it or make a fiberglass tank to fit. If someone is out there that knows how to make a “safe” fiberglass tank I’d love to hear from you.

             

            From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Muri
            Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:02 PM
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: CYOA - Leaking metal gastank

             

             

            A nimble and flexible youngster to go in there and get it out, then measuring it so that you can replace it w/ a plastic tank.

             


            From: Sonia Hruska <soniahruska@...>
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:25 AM
            Subject: CYOA - Leaking metal gastank

             

             

            My Columbia 28 has the original gastank, it is rusted. What would be the cheapest most reliable fix?

             

          • cjecje1
            I can tell you how to make a safe fiberglass fuel tank. First make a tank-like object out of 1/2 hardware cloth. Tie it together with wire. You can also use
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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              I can tell you how to make a safe fiberglass fuel tank.

              First make a tank-like object out of 1/2" hardware cloth. Tie it together with wire. You can also use the little 1/2" stubs of the wire if you trim it right. Build the tank-like object about 1/2" small all around than the space it has to fit into and make sure it fits.

              BTW: It doesn't have to go back where the old one was - I shoved the one I made for my Triton up under the starboard bridge deck.

              Lay resin (or epoxy) soaked fiberglass cloth over the hardware cloth tank. Start with a couple layers of matt as it's a little stiffer. Add a layer or two of roving and then finish with some cloth or matt. Wet every layer out Well - but remember too that the goal is to have as little resin as possible in the finished product. 3/16" or 1/4" finished thickness is enough. It's easy to make fluid-tight but it really doesn't have to be - a pinhole here and there will still be fine.

              When it's done drill some holes in the top: one about 2" and the other two maybe 1/2". Use gas tank repair epoxy to bond bronze or stainless steel pipe bushings over the holes. You want to end up with one 1 1/2" female pipe threaded hole and two 3/8" female pipe threaded holes.

              When the fittings are in and bonded and faired out all smoothly around - line the new tank with a POR-15 epoxy gas tank lining kit.

              Install and pipe the tank.

              You should have asked me last week - you could have it done already. <g>

              stephen
              ----------



              On Jun 14, 2013, at 4:39 PM, Jesse Doyle wrote:

              Jim, that tank can’t be replaced with a pre-made plastic tank. I took mine out for that same reason that they have. A nimble person isn’t needed. Just hard work. Trust me, I have looked everywhere trying to find a tank to fit. Other than a nauti tank or something of that type you won’t find one to fit. Not unless you want to go with a three to five gallon tank. The problem with the tank in the earlier Columbia 28 is that it was made to fit in the port or starboard ¼ berth hold. There are no less than five to six different angles that make it impossible to get a pre-made to fit. Not trying to be difficult Jim. I’m just going on a pain in the arse experience. If I have to do it all over again I would have found a way to line it or make a fiberglass tank to fit.

              If someone is out there that knows how to make a “safe” fiberglass tank I’d love to hear from you.

              ====================
            • Jesse Doyle
              Thanks a lot Stephen. A few of the things you said are a little hard to fathom but I m sure I can do it. What I want to do is make a pattern of where the tank
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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                Thanks a lot Stephen. A few of the things you said are a little hard to
                fathom but I'm sure I can do it. What I want to do is make a pattern of
                where the tank was and lower the top of it to where I can separate the
                amount of fuel between two tanks. One in both starboard and port 1/4 berth
                holds. That would give me about 20 gallons and still a little storage on
                top. I'm trying to find out what type of epoxy they use for aircraft tanks.
                Do you have any idea what it is? Maybe I'm trying to be totally anal about
                it. But that's what my shrink says I am. Sure wish you were closer so I
                could pay you to do it for me. Oh well, would probably cost me too much to
                have a pro do it. Thanks Stephen. I'm going to print your instructions
                anyway.
                Jesse Doyle
                1971 Columbia 28’
                #547
                s/v Wind Singer
                Redwood City, Ca.
                37º 35’ 14.32” N
                122º 18’ 58.89” W



                -----Original Message-----
                From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of cjecje1
                Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 3:49 PM
                To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: making a gas tank - Re: CYOA - Leaking metal gastank


                I can tell you how to make a safe fiberglass fuel tank.

                First make a tank-like object out of 1/2" hardware cloth. Tie it together
                with wire. You can also use the little 1/2" stubs of the wire if you trim
                it right. Build the tank-like object about 1/2" small all around than the
                space it has to fit into and make sure it fits.

                BTW: It doesn't have to go back where the old one was - I shoved the one I
                made for my Triton up under the starboard bridge deck.

                Lay resin (or epoxy) soaked fiberglass cloth over the hardware cloth tank.
                Start with a couple layers of matt as it's a little stiffer. Add a layer or
                two of roving and then finish with some cloth or matt. Wet every layer out
                Well - but remember too that the goal is to have as little resin as possible
                in the finished product. 3/16" or 1/4" finished thickness is enough. It's
                easy to make fluid-tight but it really doesn't have to be - a pinhole here
                and there will still be fine.

                When it's done drill some holes in the top: one about 2" and the other two
                maybe 1/2". Use gas tank repair epoxy to bond bronze or stainless steel
                pipe bushings over the holes. You want to end up with one 1 1/2" female
                pipe threaded hole and two 3/8" female pipe threaded holes.

                When the fittings are in and bonded and faired out all smoothly around -
                line the new tank with a POR-15 epoxy gas tank lining kit.

                Install and pipe the tank.

                You should have asked me last week - you could have it done already. <g>

                stephen
                ----------



                On Jun 14, 2013, at 4:39 PM, Jesse Doyle wrote:

                Jim, that tank can’t be replaced with a pre-made plastic tank. I took mine
                out for that same reason that they have. A nimble person isn’t needed. Just
                hard work. Trust me, I have looked everywhere trying to find a tank to fit.
                Other than a nauti tank or something of that type you won’t find one to fit.
                Not unless you want to go with a three to five gallon tank. The problem with
                the tank in the earlier Columbia 28 is that it was made to fit in the port
                or starboard ¼ berth hold. There are no less than five to six different
                angles that make it impossible to get a pre-made to fit. Not trying to be
                difficult Jim. I’m just going on a pain in the arse experience. If I have to
                do it all over again I would have found a way to line it or make a
                fiberglass tank to fit.

                If someone is out there that knows how to make a “safe” fiberglass tank I’d
                love to hear from you.

                ====================


                ------------------------------------

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