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Re: New fuel tanks almost installed and closed-cell polyethylene foam

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  • Brandon F
    I hadn t thought of aluminum straps. I was going to go with some nylon webbing. Brandon
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 19, 2013
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      I hadn't thought of aluminum straps. I was going to go with some nylon webbing.

      Brandon

      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Peter" <petemalone@...> wrote:
      >
      > That should do it on the shelves, then.
      > What about visiting your local sheet metal shop and ask them to cut some aluminum strips that you can form by hand to make the tie-down straps? If you get 0.063" (1/16") say 1-1/2" wide, and bolt the ends of the strap to the shelf with fender washers and through-bolts, it should be plenty secure. Just a thought, others will have their own approaches, and you may already have yours in mind.
      > ~ pete
      >
      >
      > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Brandon F" <brandonfordus@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi Pete,
      > >
      > > The tank beds are made of half-inch MDO (the same stuff they made PT boats out of in WWII). The joint is butted together and filled with epoxy thickened with cabicil and taped both sides with 6 ounce fiberglass cloth. Because of the shape, it is very stiff and strong. much stiffer than a flat shelf. It's about 4.5 feet long and is well supported on both ends and in the middle.
      > >
      > > I also need to figure out the best way to strap the tanks in. I'm planning to build a shelf on top of them because it will be prime storage for fenders and deck equipment.
      > >
      > > Brandon
      > >
      > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Peter" <petemalone@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > My impression of this is "why not?"
      > > > Question, what is keeping the plywood pieces together?
      > > > I see something in the pictures that looks like resin was applied. Is any glass reinforcement involved?
      > > > It is a lot of work but looking like a good job....cheers to Doryman!
      > > > ~ pete
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Brandon F" <brandonfordus@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Oceanus came with two new 55-gallon fuel tanks, but they were not installed. To complicate things, these tanks were designed to fit in the bilge of a powerboat and had a three-sided bottom--like a very open V with the bottom of the V cut off. As I looked at them, trying to puzzle out how I was going to make them work, I wished over and over that they were the plain old rectangular variety. But they are what I have and they are good (and expensive!) tanks. In fact, they are the most expensive tanks in the West Marine catalog.
      > > > >
      > > > > The only way to make them work was to cut down some storage shelves in the engine room and build three-sided beds for the tanks. I finally got the beds built with a little help from a friend. The look good and strong. My blog post about it is here:http://hagothlog.blogspot.com/2013/02/a-little-help-from-my-friends.html
      > > > >
      > > > > The guy in the next boat offered to give me some closed-cell polyethylene foam to line the fuel-tank beds. This looks like the perfect stuff to prevent the plastic tanks from chafing. Any reason I shouldn't use it?
      > > > >
      > > > > Brandon Ford
      > > > > SV Oceanus C-43
      > > > > http://hagothlog.blogspot.com
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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