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Who wants to go sailing on Chesapeake Bay tonite?

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  • wilson111lw
    I don t remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed and gusts on the Bay. http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point Larry Wilson
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 30, 2013
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      I don't remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed and gusts on the Bay.

      http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point

      Larry Wilson
    • Jim Muri
      Wow!   James R. Muri Novelist, Sailor BUY: My e-Novels at http://blizzardguy.com/venture/ SITE: http://blizzardguy.com BLOG:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 30, 2013
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        Wow!
         

        From: wilson111lw <wilson111lw@...>
        To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 4:04 PM
        Subject: CYOA - Who wants to go sailing on Chesapeake Bay tonite?

         
        I don't remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed and gusts on the Bay.

        http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point

        Larry Wilson



      • Charles Bourne
        Reminds me of the free iPhone app - Predict Wind.... Charles 87 O Day 272 Pensacola, FL ... From: wilson111lw To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com Sent:
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 30, 2013
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          Reminds me of the free iPhone app - Predict Wind....
           
          Charles
          '87 O'Day 272
          Pensacola, FL
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 6:04 PM
          Subject: CYOA - Who wants to go sailing on Chesapeake Bay tonite?

           

          I don't remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed and gusts on the Bay.

          http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point

          Larry Wilson


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        • harryjak
          That s odd enough that I would like to know the cause. Normally I would just call up the Juneau Wx office and get an explanation for weird local stuff, you
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 30, 2013
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            That's odd enough that I would like to know the cause. Normally I would just call
            up the Juneau Wx office and get an explanation for weird local stuff, you probably
            don't have the small town syndrome so you can do that.

            If you do get an explanation pass it on.

            HJ

            Wow!
            >  
            > James R. Muri
            >
            > Novelist, Sailor
            > BUY: My e-Novels at http://blizzardguy.com/venture/
            > SITE: http://blizzardguy.com
            > BLOG: http://theostrichkiller.blogspot.com
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: wilson111lw <wilson111lw@...>
            > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 4:04 PM
            > Subject: CYOA - Who wants to go sailing on Chesapeake Bay tonite?
            >
            >
            >  
            > I don't remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed and gusts
            > on the Bay.
            >
            > http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point
            >
            > Larry Wilson
            >
            >
            >
          • cchl74
            You coasties are way too used to system winds. System winds are winds going from a high pressure area to a low pressure area near the surface and are fairly
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 31, 2013
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              You coasties are way too used to system winds. System winds are winds going from a high pressure area to a low pressure area near the surface and are fairly steady. Inland lakes also see jet stream winds and thunder cell winds. Jet stream winds usually happened in the spring and fall when the jet stream is over head but it is sunny. The sun warms the ground which causes air to rise and mix with the jet stream. Because of the shear, the winds will come down to the surface. They hit at 2 PM local, (You can set your watch by it). The first few puffs are sudden 20 mph gusts out of nowhere, then all goes calm again. After about a half hour and several super gusts, they steady down to 15 - 20. Thunder cell winds come from moving cells and can be an absolute wall of wind. It is not unusual to be in a dead calm, but you can see and hear a black wall of wind a half mile away, boiling the water into white caps, and heading for you. One good aspect of thunder cell winds is that around sundown of a thunder storm day, the cells will collapse. This provides about an hour of nice winds to sail home.


                    Bruce K
                    Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                    Los Lunas, NM



              I don't remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed and gusts on the Bay.

              http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point

              Larry Wilson

            • Peter
              Here s a link to the buoy closest to Larry s forecast report: http://buoybay.noaa.gov/locations/stingray-point.html
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 31, 2013
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                Here's a link to the buoy closest to Larry's forecast report:
                http://buoybay.noaa.gov/locations/stingray-point.html

                If you go to the bottom and select the 1-day graph, you can see that the peak gust overnight was off the graph, but not as high as gust forecast of 56 kts.

                It may be that the reason the peak gust was forecast so high is due to extrapolation of data from the extreme difference in upper level and lower level wind tempareatures, which was mixing just north of the buoy location.

                Cold air comes down like a train under those conditions. 

                ~ pete  

                --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, Kbjmjrb@... wrote:
                >
                > You coasties are way too used to system winds. System winds are winds going
                > from a high pressure area to a low pressure area near the surface and are
                > fairly steady. Inland lakes also see jet stream winds and thunder cell winds.
                > Jet stream winds usually happened in the spring and fall when the jet
                > stream is over head but it is sunny. The sun warms the ground which causes air to
                > rise and mix with the jet stream. Because of the shear, the winds will come
                > down to the surface. They hit at 2 PM local, (You can set your watch by
                > it). The first few puffs are sudden 20 mph gusts out of nowhere, then all goes
                > calm again. After about a half hour and several super gusts, they steady
                > down to 15 - 20. Thunder cell winds come from moving cells and can be an
                > absolute wall of wind. It is not unusual to be in a dead calm, but you can see and
                > hear a black wall of wind a half mile away, boiling the water into white
                > caps, and heading for you. One good aspect of thunder cell winds is that
                > around sundown of a thunder storm day, the cells will collapse. This provides
                > about an hour of nice winds to sail home.
                >
                >
                > Bruce K
                > Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                > Los Lunas, NM
                >
                > >
                > >
                > > I don't remember ever seeing this sort of differential between wind speed
                > > and gusts on the Bay.
                > >
                > > http://www.windfinder.com/forecast/stingray_point
                > >
                > > Larry Wilson
                > >
                > >
                >

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