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Re: CYOA - Doing the bunga-bunga dance

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  • Paul Esterle
    Here is another solution for you. Use a smaller hole saw to cut a plug the same size as the existing hole. If you come close, build it up to the right size,
    Message 1 of 85 , Apr 3 10:52 AM
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      Here is another solution for you. Use a smaller hole saw to cut a plug
      the same size as the existing hole. If you come close, build it up to
      the right size, loose fit, with tape. Use that plug inside the new hole
      saw (without the pilot drill) to enlarge the existing hole. The plug
      will keep the hole saw center without risking bodily injury...

      Capt'n Pauley (Paul Esterle)
      Freelance Boating Writer
      www.thevirtualboatyard.com
      www.youtube.com/user/captnpauley
      www.lulu.com/spotlight/pesterle
    • Sailwood@aol.com
      Larry, My habit w.r.t. holes as you describe is to use the Forstner bit first, then drill the smaller thru-hole via the pinpoint at the bottom of the larger
      Message 85 of 85 , Apr 18 2:21 PM
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        Larry,
         
        My habit w.r.t.  holes as you describe is to use the Forstner bit first, then drill the smaller thru-hole via the pinpoint at the bottom of the larger hole.  The point on the Forstner, as with the brad point bit, keeps it from walking.  Of course, holding the Forstner gets a bit tricky if you hired out at as a Painkiller taster the night before.
         
        Doug
         
        In a message dated 4/18/2012 9:13:08 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, radicalcy@... writes:
         

        When I replaced the handrails on the Sabre, I mucked it all up. I tried to eyeball the placement, and used a handheld power drill to bore the new rails using the old holes in the cabin top as a guide.
        In retrospect, what I should have done was to fill the old holes in the deck, and then paid a milling shop to drill the handrails using a precise drill press, making sure that the holes were centered in the rail.(They can do the bung holes at the same time using a forstner bit.)Make sure that the interior handrail insets are large enough to get your socket on the nut and of course use bolts that are the exact length that you need.(Use varnish to glue the bungs, not epoxy.) Then using the new holes as a template, I should have marked the cabin top, drilled new holes there, overdrilled them, filled, and redrilled.
        Of course if you're reusing the old rails, just ignore all of the above.
        Using the handheld drill created too much wobble and the forstner bit chewed up the holes to the point that I couldn't fit bungs in them.I finally filled them with 5200. My way looked good for about a year, and then UV started in on them, and they looked like crap.
        I agree with Bruce. Use a good dense butyl such as that sold by MaineSail on the Sailboatowners.com site,as opposed to the crap that the RV supply sells. I bought two rolls from him, and it's been a godsend. Just follow his detailed instructions.
        Larry Wilson
        --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "niebur32" <niebur32@...> wrote:
        >
        > Brad point bit sounds like a good idea.
        >
        > I think I will give it a try. Not much to loose. If I hit wood, I can still overdrill larger.
        >
        >
        > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, Sailwood@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Mark the center, use brad point bit. Let me know
        > >
        > >
        > > In a message dated 4/16/2012 3:39:45 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > > lance@ writes:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > you only have to over drill enough so there is epoxy, not wood. Good luck
        > > centering... it's not easy - maybe use a drill press.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > On Apr 16, 2012, at 2:14 PM, niebur32 wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > More bunga-bunga news!
        > >
        > > I took off the rails on the port side this weekend. As usual, the second
        > > one was a lot easier than the first. Bruce' method of holding the hole-saw
        > > with a work glove and starting at high speed worked very well, even better
        > > now that I have a better feel for the process. My 'improvement' of inserting
        > > a wood piece inside is probably not necessary; you cannot center is
        > > precisely anyway. Overall, while the Stb side took me the better part of an
        > > afternoon, the port side was all out in 1 hour. And I cracked the Stb side in
        > > two places (one inside, one outside); I learned that long pieces of teak are
        > > surprisingly brittle. Already fixed with epoxy but still annoying. Nothing
        > > like that happened on the port side since I now knew how to treat it.
        > >
        > > Incidentally, the hole saw I used was a bi-metal type, not carbon steel.
        > > Expensive but worth it. I hit the nuts several times and I am not sure a
        > > regular carbon steel saw would have gone through all of the 10 holes (and even
        > > be serviceable after that). With the bi-metal, other than some paint that
        > > came off the saw, it is as new. Some of the stainless steel nuts got a bit
        > > mangled but they are easy to replace.
        > >
        > > I still don't know why the bolts were bent. I also found some on the port
        > > side and ended up cutting them with a dremel (I could loosen the nuts
        > > somewhat, then pull down the rail and cut between rail and ceiling). Whoever it
        > > was (Larry? that suggested someone mis-treated the bolts with a vise-grip
        > > or something may have been up to something. For this reason, also my
        > > glorious idea of bending them ba ck with a coupling nut did not work: the threads
        > > were so deformed that I could not even get the c. nut on them.
        > >
        > > Overall, that went pretty well. I overdrilled all holes and they are now
        > > filled with epoxy.
        > >
        > > Of course, I have another question :). The bolts are 1/4" and I
        > > overdrilled to 3/8". I now wonder if that is enough. How closely will I be able to
        > > center the new holes? If perfectly centered, I will have 1/16" of epoxy
        > > around the bolts; is that enough or should I have chosen a larger drill? I
        > > looked at the 1/2" but that seemed way too big.
        > >
        > > There must be an SOP (or at least collective wisdom) about how much to
        > > overdrill. Does anyone know?
        > >
        > > --Ernst
        > >
        > > --- In _columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com_
        > > (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com) , "niebur32" <niebur32@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Good theory. Indeed, the bolts were longer than needed but they did NOT
        > > break off at the nut. They all extended for another 1/2" or so.
        > > >
        > > > --- In _columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com_
        > > (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com) , "Larry W" <radicalcy@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > My guess is that someone installed longer bolts than needed, clamped a
        > > vice grip on the end, and bent it until it broke off at the nut. In the
        > > process, it bent the length of the bolt.
        > > > > Larry Wilson
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In _columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com_
        > > (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com) , "niebur32" <niebur32@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Impact wrench? Short socket? I certainly like the idea that it
        > > wasn't me who is guilty of this.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > But, whoever did that would have had to push just as hard on the
        > > wrench to bend he bolt as I would have had to do with my improved hole saw,
        > > right?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > But maybe they didn't care...
        > > > & gt; >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In _columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com_
        > > (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com) , Kbjmjrb@ wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Ernst,
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I have a hard time believing that you bent those bolts. My guess
        > > is
        > > > > > > that they were installed with an impact wrench with a shallow
        > > socket. Although
        > > > > > > useful, they can bugger things up faster than a Vice-Grip in an
        > > engine
        > > > > > > shop. Why anybody would use such things to assemble a boat? Who
        > > knows? Maybe
        > > > > > > they needed to anchor the ends so the hired help could finish the
        > > job.
        > > > > > > Expediency can open some strange doors.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Bruce K
        > > > > > > Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
        > > > > > > Los Luna s, NM
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > The thought that the bolts were bent by exertion of excessive
        > > force on
        > > > > > > > the deck side of the rails occurred to me. However, I have three
        > > reasons why
        > > > > > > > I don't believe that is the case:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > a) The two bent ones are the most forward one and the aftmost
        > > one. If
        > > > > > > > there was an 'event' that bent two bolts, I would expect them to
        > > be neighbors
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > b) I would also expect that it would have left the wooden rail
        > > somewhat
        > > > > > > > wobbly. But it was rock solid everywhere
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > c) The bending occurs BEYOND the nut on the bottom. I can see no
        > > scenario
        > > > > > > > in which bending from th e outside would bend the bolt under
        > > the nut.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > I still can't believe that I pressed so hard on the hole saw
        > > that I bent
        > > > > > > > two 1/4" SS bolts but, considering the evidence, I am more and
        > > more tending
        > > > > > > > towards this explanation.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ---
        > > Lance Como
        > > Como Consortium Ltd. WorldWide
        > > 2933 Quail Avenue North
        > > Golden Valley, MN 55422
        > > USA
        > >
        > >
        > > 763.521.5276 Office
        > > 763.234.8008 Mobile
        > > 612.677.3277 Fax
        > > 800 730.6824 Toll-Free
        > >
        > >
        > > _lance@_ (mailto:lance@) E-mail
        > > _lancecomo@_ (mailto:lancecomo@) International E-mail
        > > http://_www.comoltd.com_ (http://www.comoltd.com/) Website
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > _http://www.boatrepairandmaintenance.com_
        > > (http://www.boatrepairandmaintenance.com/)
        > >
        > > _lance@_
        > > (mailto:lance@)
        > >
        >

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