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Re: thru hulls

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  • Patn44
    An impeler is cheap compared to the sinking of the boat. Always close the seacocks. Thats why they are installed... to prevent sinking when the hose
    Message 1 of 38 , Aug 1, 2011
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      An impeler is cheap compared to the sinking of the boat. Always close the seacocks. Thats why they are installed... to prevent sinking when the hose clamp/hose fails. (have started the diesel with seacock closed then opened it and no problem... didn't let it run more than a min).

      Another thing to add to the check list: turn off and disconnect the pressure/shore water hose. Saw a brand new boat sunk at the dock due to the pressure water hose rupturing inboard.

      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Larry W" <radicalcy@...> wrote:
      >
      > According to Boat US...failed thru hull/hose fittings, are the single biggest cause of boats sinking at the dock. And not a FEW boats. If you can't remember to close/open your engine seacock, make a checklist for arriving at, and leaving the boat. Mine also includes checking to make sure all electronics are turned off, and the battery charger is working. Also, the bilge pump float switch is free and working.
      >
      > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "jhnblngr" <jhnblngr@> wrote:
      > >
      > > i have just purchased a 27 foot boat with a diesel engine, sink, marine head, etc. it has numerous thru hulls that have been changed out from gate valves to plastic ball valves. someone mentioned to me about keeping the thru hull valves closed except when the boat is in use. my friend has said to me that that is not necessary. that, for instance, if i forget to open the one for the engine cooling water intake, i will destroy the impeller in short order. any advice or opinions welcome. i live in texas and the boat is in the water year round.
      > >
      >
    • Jai Elizabeth
      Unsubscribe@eGroups.com ________________________________ From: Andrew Geddes To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com Sent:
      Message 38 of 38 , Aug 16, 2011
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        Unsubscribe@...

        From: Andrew Geddes <awgeddes@...>
        To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2011 8:43 AM
        Subject: RE: CYOA - Re: thru hulls

         

        Surely what is sticking is the valve itself, not the handle which turns it? Don’t know how you lube the valve itself while the boat is in the water unless you dive down from outside and give it a shot with a grease gun while it is closed but even that wld only lube 180 degrees of the valve. With the valve closed i suppose you cld take the inner hose off and give it a shot of grease and thereby cover the other 180 degrees but surely better (and safer?)  just to strip and grease the valve when the boat is out of the water?

        Rgds

        Andrew

         

        From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patn44
        Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2011 1:29 PM
        To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: CYOA - Re: thru hulls

         

         

        through hulls and seacocks were all bronze. some of the fittings used to connect the hoses were brass. not a good combination. I would never use brass but apparently the PO did. Would also not use plastic. The new seacocks have the SS ball for closure and I find that it needs frequent lube and turning to keep them freed up. any thoughts on that?

        --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Geddes" <awgeddes@...> wrote:
        >
        > Sounds to me that yr seacocks were brass when they shld have been bronze. If
        > brass is used there is a slow process of de-zincification whereby the zinc
        > is slowly lost from the brass, thereby leaving a more copper-rich matrix.
        > This is why they were red. You were a short step from disaster!
        >
        >
        >
        > Modern seacocks are always bronze (alloy of copper and tin) and do not
        > suffer from this problem. Brass would of course be cheaper since zinc but
        > it wld be a big mistake to use it for seacocks because of its limited life.
        >
        >
        >
        > Best of luck
        >
        > Andrew .
        >
        >
        >
        > From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Patn44
        > Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2011 12:32 PM
        > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: CYOA - Re: thru hulls
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Not only the seacocks can fail. I broke the T handle on the large discharge
        > seacock in the V berth. Hauled the boat and repaired it. (also painted the
        > bottom as was needed). Then decided to 'test' the other seacocks to make
        > sure they were still operational. (I had been in the habit of leaving the
        > seacocks open most of the time...my bad). The intake under the sink came
        > apart in my hand. the core had completely degraded, the brass fittings
        > holding the hoses had turned red (a sign of degradation) and were brittle so
        > the whole had to be replaced. As all seacocks were, I believe, original, I
        > decided to replace all seacocks and through hulls. Also replaced all the
        > hoses and clamps. On replacing the head discharge through hull I found that
        > a PO had used a plastic through hull and that the seacock was held on with
        > barely 1/4" of thread. A heart stopping finding.
        >
        > ps: ran across an article that advised not attaching the through hulls to
        > the bonding system as it will cause them to become the egress for stray
        > electrical current and will degrade them quickly.
        > (mine were not attached to the bonding system).
        >
        > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts%40yahoogroups.com> , "tomcalthrop" <tom@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi,
        > >
        > > I live aboard on a Columbia 36'. I close seacocks when I leave the boat
        > overnight or when I travel away from her. Daily (when I go to work) I keep
        > them open. There are a couple of side notes here though....
        > >
        > > I have a tiny bilge pump.. that just takes care of the occasional puddle
        > from a hatch left open etc. Mounted about 1" higher that that I have a high
        > volume bilge pump with an audio sounder that would wake the dead (close to
        > the state I adopt when sleeping ;) ). I have a battery bank that can keep
        > that pumping for several hours.
        > >
        > > I always keep my engine seacock closed when starting the engine then open
        > immediately after. If the engine does not start I don't want to risk pumping
        > a load of salt water through it. If you forget the engine will sound a
        > temperature alarm. If you grease your impeller (glycerol, silicone grease or
        > Vaseline) it will survive a dry moment or two.
        > >
        > > Always a good idea to test seacocks can open AND close when near land and
        > shops... too many people leave their seacocks open only to discover that
        > they won't close when the seas are beating down on them.
        > >
        > > Happy sailing.
        > >
        > > Tom
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:columbiasailingyachts%40yahoogroups.com> , "jhnblngr" <jhnblngr@>
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > i have just purchased a 27 foot boat with a diesel engine, sink, marine
        > head, etc. it has numerous thru hulls that have been changed out from gate
        > valves to plastic ball valves. someone mentioned to me about keeping the
        > thru hull valves closed except when the boat is in use. my friend has said
        > to me that that is not necessary. that, for instance, if i forget to open
        > the one for the engine cooling water intake, i will destroy the impeller in
        > short order. any advice or opinions welcome. i live in texas and the boat is
        > in the water year round.
        > > >
        > >
        >



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