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Using Salvage Parts

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  • David Morgan
    I was working around my own house today trying to tidy up outside.  I found a couple planks left over from a day sailor I owned, that suffered an ignominous
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2009
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      I was working around my own house today trying to tidy up outside.  I found a couple planks left over from a day sailor I owned, that suffered an ignominous fate a few years ago.  Nothing special, except they were relatively intact as single pieces when I recovered the wreckage.  Now I need to find a way to incorporate them in Eaglet.  A couple floor planks, the STBD cockpit combing (SP?) and a piece that went across the rear of the cockpit, with a metal edge the tiller would slide along.  There are a couple pieces of hardware somewhere too......  I've moved to many times since then.  But they're around somewhere. 

      I think the floor boards might become cockpit deck grate. 
       David
      Bremerton, WA
      1968 C-22 #1109
      "Eaglet"




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • cmckesson2000
      Way to go! I love the look that results from that sort of salvage. Someday I would like to replace the pillar in the C-36 with a really pretty piece of
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Way to go! I love the look that results from that sort of salvage.

        Someday I would like to replace the pillar in the C-36 with a really pretty piece of driftwood, from someplace special... Or the cabinet doors with ones removed from a stranded Grand Old Lady...

        The Pequod's rails were carved from sperm whale teeth. I'll never reach that stage, but I fundamentally approve of the 'incorporated salvage with history' method of "decorating."

        Chris


        --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, David Morgan <sapper69k@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was working around my own house today trying to tidy up outside.  I found a couple planks left over from a day sailor I owned, that suffered an ignominous fate a few years ago.  Nothing special, except they were relatively intact as single pieces when I recovered the wreckage.  Now I need to find a way to incorporate them in Eaglet.  A couple floor planks, the STBD cockpit combing (SP?) and a piece that went across the rear of the cockpit, with a metal edge the tiller would slide along.  There are a couple pieces of hardware somewhere too......  I've moved to many times since then.  But they're around somewhere. 
        >
        > I think the floor boards might become cockpit deck grate. 
        >  David
        > Bremerton, WA
        > 1968 C-22 #1109
        > "Eaglet"
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
        Actually, the Pequod s, open bulwarks were garnished like one continuous jaw, with the long, sharp teeth of the sperm whale inserted there for pins . Her
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2009
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          Actually, the Pequod's, "open bulwarks were garnished like one continuous
          jaw, with the long, sharp teeth of the sperm whale inserted there for pins".
          Her sheaves were whale bone and the tiller was a single jaw bone. There was
          a tent on the quarterdeck for the sailing master when in port made of Right
          Whale bones. The mere sight of her today would probably kill a Green Peacer
          outright.


          Bruce K
          Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
          Los Lunas, NM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Way to go! I love the look that results from that sort of salvage.
          >
          > Someday I would like to replace the pillar in the C-36 with a really
          > pretty piece of driftwood, from someplace special... Or the cabinet doors with
          > ones removed from a stranded Grand Old Lady...
          >
          > The Pequod's rails were carved from sperm whale teeth. I'll never reach
          > that stage, but I fundamentally approve of the 'incorporated salvage with
          > history' method of "decorating."
          >
          > Chris
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • cmckesson2000
          The very picture of Sustainability - given her fishery! C
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 2, 2009
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            The very picture of Sustainability - given her fishery!

            C
            --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, Kbjmjrb@... wrote:
            >
            > Actually, the Pequod's, "open bulwarks were garnished like one continuous
            > jaw, with the long, sharp teeth of the sperm whale inserted there for pins".
            > Her sheaves were whale bone and the tiller was a single jaw bone. There was
            > a tent on the quarterdeck for the sailing master when in port made of Right
            > Whale bones. The mere sight of her today would probably kill a Green Peacer
            > outright.
            >
            >
            > Bruce K
            > Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
            > Los Lunas, NM
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Way to go! I love the look that results from that sort of salvage.
            > >
            > > Someday I would like to replace the pillar in the C-36 with a really
            > > pretty piece of driftwood, from someplace special... Or the cabinet doors with
            > > ones removed from a stranded Grand Old Lady...
            > >
            > > The Pequod's rails were carved from sperm whale teeth. I'll never reach
            > > that stage, but I fundamentally approve of the 'incorporated salvage with
            > > history' method of "decorating."
            > >
            > > Chris
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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