Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Beer XX, (Off Topic)

Expand Messages
  • Alan Clendinen
    Steve, I m fluent in Spanish, and the letter x is pronounced as ek-ees. Alan [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Steve,

      I'm fluent in Spanish, and the letter x is pronounced as "ek-ees."

      Alan

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • sgaber@tampabay.rr.com
      Alan: Yeah, that s how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j? Don t some
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Alan:

        Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?

        Don't some Mexicans spell them "Mejico" and "Tejas?"

        I am not what I'd call fluent in Spanish, but I've been to Panama twice for 3-4 months each time and spoke it pretty well at the time.

        Steve Gaber
        Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
        Oldsmar, FL

        ---- Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:
        > Steve,
        >
        > I'm fluent in Spanish, and the letter x is pronounced as "ek-ees."
        >
        > Alan
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >

        --
      • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
        But in this case, the X s are pronounced as letters. As I said, the name was originally Siglo XX , (Spanish for the twentieth century using Roman
        Message 3 of 21 , Jun 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          But in this case, the "X"'s are pronounced as letters. As I said, the name
          was originally "Siglo XX", (Spanish for the twentieth century using Roman
          numerials), because it was started in the year 1900. They have since dropped
          the "Siglo".


          Bruce K
          Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
          Los Lunas, NM >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Alan:
          >
          > Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a
          > word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?
          >
          > Don't some Mexicans spell them "Mejico" and "Tejas?"
          >
          > I am not what I'd call fluent in Spanish, but I've been to Panama twice
          > for 3-4 months each time and spoke it pretty well at the time.
          >
          > Steve Gaber
          > Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
          > Oldsmar, FL
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Frank Schenk
          Steve, If they did not giggle when you spoke, your Spanish was OK. No one in a foreign country expects an American to be able to speak a foreign language very
          Message 4 of 21 , Jun 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Steve,

            If they did not giggle when you spoke, your Spanish was OK. No one in a foreign country expects an American to be able to speak a foreign language very well. If you spoke the language very well, they would complement you.

            Frank Schenk
            Agape C26 MKII
            Grapevine Lake
            Texas

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: sgaber@...
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 4:22 PM
            Subject: Re: CYOA - Re: Beer XX, (Off Topic)





            Alan:

            Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?

            Don't some Mexicans spell them "Mejico" and "Tejas?"

            I am not what I'd call fluent in Spanish, but I've been to Panama twice for 3-4 months each time and spoke it pretty well at the time.

            Steve Gaber
            Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
            Oldsmar, FL

            ---- Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:
            > Steve,
            >
            > I'm fluent in Spanish, and the letter x is pronounced as "ek-ees."
            >
            > Alan
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >

            --




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • CJE
            I try to keep it to just the essentials. Early in the morning I ask for: dos werewolves. For the rest of the day: dos cerveza por favor gets me through for
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 1, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              I try to keep it to just the essentials.

              Early in the morning I ask for: dos werewolves.

              For the rest of the day: dos cerveza por favor gets me through for
              the most part.

              BTW: I have a Spanish nickname which is: Muy Gringo. Whenever they
              know enough to call me by it I always gracious respond: Yo Soy!

              stephen
              ------------


              On Jun 1, 2009, at 6:25 PM, Frank Schenk wrote:

              Steve,
              If they did not giggle when you spoke, your Spanish was OK. No one in
              a foreign country expects an American to be able to speak a foreign
              language very well. If you spoke the language very well, they would
              complement you.

              Frank Schenk
              -------------------
            • sgaber@tampabay.rr.com
              Frank: When I was in Panama, I always brought my pocket dictionary. Nobody ever laughed at me for trying. My crew DID laugh at the French graduate student when
              Message 6 of 21 , Jun 1, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Frank:

                When I was in Panama, I always brought my pocket dictionary. Nobody ever laughed at me for trying. My crew DID laugh at the French graduate student when she spoke Spanish. She never tried to improve her Spanish, but tried to force French upon them. I'll tell you about my experiences with the French some day.

                Part of my job was to negotiate with local farmers and cattle ranchers to let us dig shovel test pits at 25 meter intervals on their land. I spent a lot of time looking up words I didn't know to get my points across. But they were very patient with me and always appreciated my efforts to speak their language. That got me a lot of points and almost always their permission and co-operation.

                My Panamanian crew helped me learn a lot. By the time I left, they said I spoke "casi sin acento" -- almost without an accent. My vocabulary was lacking, but I sounded good.

                My time in Panama was in 1979 and again in 1984. Previously, I had four years of Spanish in High School, 1958-1961, and was not a good student then.

                In doing this major NSF-funded multidisciplinary study of the Santa Maria River Drainage Basin, we worked with lots of scientists, students, visitors, journalists, etc., from all over Latin America. I had no trouble communicating with anyone except Cubans and Puerto Ricans. They spoke so fast, muddled their words together and used so much of their own vernacular that understanding them was next to impossible.

                Steve Gaber
                Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
                Oldsmar, FL

                ---- Frank Schenk <fdschenk@...> wrote:
                > Steve,
                >
                > If they did not giggle when you spoke, your Spanish was OK. No one in a foreign country expects an American to be able to speak a foreign language very well. If you spoke the language very well, they would complement you.
                >
                > Frank Schenk
                > Agape C26 MKII
                > Grapevine Lake
                > Texas
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: sgaber@...
                > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Monday, June 01, 2009 4:22 PM
                > Subject: Re: CYOA - Re: Beer XX, (Off Topic)
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Alan:
                >
                > Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?
                >
                > Don't some Mexicans spell them "Mejico" and "Tejas?"
                >
                > I am not what I'd call fluent in Spanish, but I've been to Panama twice for 3-4 months each time and spoke it pretty well at the time.
                >
                > Steve Gaber
                > Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
                > Oldsmar, FL
                >
                > ---- Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:
                > > Steve,
                > >
                > > I'm fluent in Spanish, and the letter x is pronounced as "ek-ees."
                > >
                > > Alan
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
                > --
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >

                --
              • Alan Clendinen
                Steve, Yeah, that s how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j? That s
                Message 7 of 21 , Jun 2, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Steve,

                  "Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a
                  word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?"

                  That's correct; the x would be pronounced as a hard h. The exception to this
                  would be Aztec names, where the x might be pronounced like a z, or like we
                  gringos pronounce an x.

                  As for those Mexicans who spell Mexico and Texas as "Mejico" and "Tejas" I
                  would call such misspellings examples of Spanglish.

                  Yeah, I lived in Teluca, Mexico back in the early 70s, but spent several
                  years living in Central America. My favorite country is Costa Rica.

                  Alan


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • CJE
                  The Rio Dulce area is very nice. stephen ... On Jun 2, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Alan Clendinen wrote: Steve, Yeah, that s how you pronounce the letter itself. But
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jun 2, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The Rio Dulce area is very nice.

                    stephen
                    ------------



                    On Jun 2, 2009, at 12:10 PM, Alan Clendinen wrote:



                    Steve,

                    "Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context
                    of a
                    word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?"

                    That's correct; the x would be pronounced as a hard h. The exception
                    to this
                    would be Aztec names, where the x might be pronounced like a z, or
                    like we
                    gringos pronounce an x.

                    As for those Mexicans who spell Mexico and Texas as "Mejico" and
                    "Tejas" I
                    would call such misspellings examples of Spanglish.

                    Yeah, I lived in Teluca, Mexico back in the early 70s, but spent several
                    years living in Central America. My favorite country is Costa Rica.

                    Alan

                    -------------
                  • sgaber@tampabay.rr.com
                    Alan: I ve never been to Costa Rica, but I d like to go there. I thought about buying or building a house there, but my wife thought it was still a Third
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jun 3, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Alan:

                      I've never been to Costa Rica, but I'd like to go there. I thought about buying or building a house there, but my wife thought it was still a Third World country. And too far from her Sisty Uglers.

                      Steve Gaber
                      Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
                      Oldsmar, FL

                      ---- Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:
                      > Steve,
                      >
                      > "Yeah, that's how you pronounce the letter itself. But in the context of a
                      > word, such as Mexico or Texas, is it not like a hard H or a soft j?"
                      >
                      > That's correct; the x would be pronounced as a hard h. The exception to this
                      > would be Aztec names, where the x might be pronounced like a z, or like we
                      > gringos pronounce an x.
                      >
                      > As for those Mexicans who spell Mexico and Texas as "Mejico" and "Tejas" I
                      > would call such misspellings examples of Spanglish.
                      >
                      > Yeah, I lived in Teluca, Mexico back in the early 70s, but spent several
                      > years living in Central America. My favorite country is Costa Rica.
                      >
                      > Alan
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

                      --
                    • Alan Clendinen
                      Stephen, Yeah, Rio Dulce is a popular place with cruisers, as it provides some nice anchorage. That s one place I have on my list of places to visit when we go
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jun 3, 2009
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Stephen,

                        Yeah, Rio Dulce is a popular place with cruisers, as it provides some nice
                        anchorage. That's one place I have on my list of places to visit when we go
                        cruising the Caribbean.

                        Alan


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Alan Clendinen
                        Steve, Yeah, I ve often dreamed about going back to Costa Rica to live. It s become a popular country for Americans to retire to, because you can buy
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jun 3, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Steve,

                          Yeah, I've often dreamed about going back to Costa Rica to live. It's become
                          a popular country for Americans to retire to, because you can buy
                          real-estate that looks like Hawaii, but at third-world prices. Unlike her
                          Central America neighbors,Costa Rica has always been a democracy. Costa Rica
                          is one of the few countries in the region that has preserved large areas of
                          rain forest.

                          Alan


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • sgaber@tampabay.rr.com
                          Somebody who was considering moving there said it s being ruined by rising prices and increasing crime rates. She said there are no more bargains because
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jun 3, 2009
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Somebody who was considering moving there said it's being ruined by rising prices and increasing crime rates. She said there are no more bargains because Americans, Brits, Germans and French buying property drove the prices up greatly. Also, she said drug dealers and other criminals from Cuba, Mexico, Columbia, etc., are moving in are causing it be less safe than it used to be.

                            The Costa Rican people are being over-run by foreigners.

                            I think the same has happened in Honduras and Belize.

                            Paradise lost.

                            Steve Gaber
                            Sanderling, 1967 C-31 #77
                            Oldsmar, FL


                            ---- Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:
                            > Steve,
                            >
                            > Yeah, I've often dreamed about going back to Costa Rica to live. It's become
                            > a popular country for Americans to retire to, because you can buy
                            > real-estate that looks like Hawaii, but at third-world prices. Unlike her
                            > Central America neighbors,Costa Rica has always been a democracy. Costa Rica
                            > is one of the few countries in the region that has preserved large areas of
                            > rain forest.
                            >
                            > Alan
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >

                            --
                          • Alan Clendinen
                            Steve, All true, but as far as living costs go, Costa Rica is still a bargain, compared to US real-estate. Speaking of Honduras, Roatan, one of that nation s
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jun 4, 2009
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Steve,

                              All true, but as far as living costs go, Costa Rica is still a bargain,
                              compared to US real-estate. Speaking of Honduras, Roatan, one of that
                              nation's islands located off its coast, would be a nice choice, especially
                              if you are into SCUBA, or have a sailboat to live aboard. Lots of coves that
                              provide protected anchorage, and Roatan is surrounded by the second largest
                              reef system in the world. My wife and I honeymooned there back in 1986. The
                              relaxed island atmosphere reminded me of the Abacos, and most of the natives
                              speak English.

                              Alan


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Lookoutnw
                              C an someone refresh my memory or explain to me HOW BEER IS OFF TOPIC???? Jim & Chong Lussier KE7YOP SV Dawn Treader 74 Columbia / Sailcrafter 45 #201 Olympia,
                              Message 14 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
                              • 0 Attachment
                                C an someone refresh my memory or explain to me HOW BEER IS OFF TOPIC????

                                Jim & Chong Lussier
                                KE7YOP
                                SV Dawn Treader
                                74 Columbia / Sailcrafter 45 #201
                                Olympia, WA




                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
                                Jim, I was the one who tagged that because I interjected a few comments about where the two X s came from. Historical etymology seemed a bit of a deviation
                                Message 15 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Jim,
                                  I was the one who tagged that because I interjected a few comments about
                                  where the two "X's" came from. Historical etymology seemed a bit of a
                                  deviation from the beer itself. Besides, what if we were talking about beer and
                                  suddenly, somebody switched topics from beer to what constitutes off topic.
                                  That would be off topic, so its anticipatory insurance.


                                  Bruce K
                                  Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                                  Los Lunas, NM


                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > C an someone refresh my memory or explain to me HOW BEER IS OFF TOPIC????
                                  >
                                  > Jim &Chong Lussier
                                  > KE7YOP
                                  > SV Dawn Treader
                                  > 74 Columbia / Sailcrafter 45 #201
                                  > Olympia, WA
                                  >
                                  >

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • William White
                                  Around the marina beer is the primary currency for trade -- William white S/V Aline http://sv-aline.blogspot.com/
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Jun 8, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Around the marina beer is the primary currency for trade
                                    --
                                    William white
                                    S/V Aline
                                    http://sv-aline.blogspot.com/

                                    On Mon, 2009-06-08 at 15:27 -0400, Kbjmjrb@... wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Jim,
                                    > I was the one who tagged that because I interjected a few comments
                                    > about
                                    > where the two "X's" came from. Historical etymology seemed a bit of a
                                    > deviation from the beer itself. Besides, what if we were talking about
                                    > beer and
                                    > suddenly, somebody switched topics from beer to what constitutes off
                                    > topic.
                                    > That would be off topic, so its anticipatory insurance.
                                    >
                                    > Bruce K
                                    > Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                                    > Los Lunas, NM
                                    >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > C an someone refresh my memory or explain to me HOW BEER IS OFF
                                    > TOPIC????
                                  • Lookoutnw
                                    I figured that since the VAST MAJORITY of this list has beer, rum, vodka, wine, everclear, bourbon, shine, hootch, compote and etc, etc, etc SO VERY NEAR to
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Jun 9, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      I figured that since the VAST MAJORITY of this list has beer, rum, vodka,
                                      wine, everclear, bourbon, 'shine, hootch, compote and etc, etc, etc SO VERY
                                      NEAR to their hearts and throats, that Beer can never be an 'OFF' Topic.


                                      Jim & Chong Lussier
                                      KE7YOP
                                      SV Dawn Treader
                                      74 Columbia / Sailcrafter 45 #201
                                      Olympia, WA

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                                      [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Kbjmjrb@...
                                      Sent: Monday, June 08, 2009 12:27 PM
                                      To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: CYOA - Re: Beer XX, (Off Topic)





                                      Jim,
                                      I was the one who tagged that because I interjected a few comments about
                                      where the two "X's" came from. Historical etymology seemed a bit of a
                                      deviation from the beer itself. Besides, what if we were talking about beer
                                      and
                                      suddenly, somebody switched topics from beer to what constitutes off topic.
                                      That would be off topic, so its anticipatory insurance.

                                      Bruce K
                                      Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                                      Los Lunas, NM

                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > C an someone refresh my memory or explain to me HOW BEER IS OFF TOPIC????
                                      >
                                      > Jim &Chong Lussier
                                      > KE7YOP
                                      > SV Dawn Treader
                                      > 74 Columbia / Sailcrafter 45 #201
                                      > Olympia, WA
                                      >
                                      >

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.