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Transatlantic passage story

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  • Alan Clendinen
    Hey guys, The February edition of Cruising World has an interesting story about a man who did a solo transatlantic passage on his vintage 28-foot Pearson
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1 2:10 AM
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      Hey guys,

      The February edition of Cruising World has an interesting story about a man
      who did a solo transatlantic passage on his vintage 28-foot Pearson Triton.

      Alan


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Harry James
      Not as vintage as some of the sailors. There are at least three in Mexico right now one with a 70 plus year old skipper. There is usually an Atlantic crossing
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1 9:40 PM
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        Not as vintage as some of the sailors. There are at least three in
        Mexico right now one with a 70 plus year old skipper. There is usually
        an Atlantic crossing that I know about almost every year.

        HJ

        Alan Clendinen wrote:
        > Hey guys,
        >
        > The February edition of Cruising World has an interesting story about a man
        > who did a solo transatlantic passage on his vintage 28-foot Pearson Triton.
        >
        > Alan
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Alan Clendinen
        Harry, Yeah, plenty of vintage sailors, but even though a 1966 Pearson Triton may only be 42 years old, you have to adjust for the species, sort of like you do
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 2 4:32 PM
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          Harry,

          Yeah, plenty of vintage sailors, but even though a 1966 Pearson Triton may
          only be 42 years old, you have to adjust for the species, sort of like you
          do for dog-years. So let's see...42 years X 5 =210 in boat years.

          Alan

          Harry wrote:
          "Not as vintage as some of the sailors. There are at least three in
          Mexico right now one with a 70 plus year old skipper. There is usually
          an Atlantic crossing that I know about almost every year."


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Stephen Williams
          Upon reading Alan s message below, we began discussing just exactly how it is that an interested party might determine boat years .   We assume {yeah, I
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 3 8:54 PM
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            Upon reading Alan's message below, we began discussing just exactly how it is that an interested party might determine "boat years".   We assume {yeah, I know how to disect that word too, and yes, we do have too much time on our hands around here} that before beginning, one must have some established and agreed upon number for the average years that a sailboat "lives".  I read something sometime about the lifespan of small wooden sailboats, but once barrier coated, and avoiding major catastrophe, it seems that a fiberglass sailboat should just about last forever........but they don't do they?  Catastrophe and neglect do occur.  Still.....my 8.7 will undoubtedly last longer than I.  If we pick 66.12 as average human lifespan worldwide, and Alan arbitrarily picks "5" as the number of human lifespans that a sailboat would last, shouldn't it be that a 42 year old Triton would only be in it's adolescence, perhaps much, much younger (8 in boat years,
            while a 90 year old man would be 297 in boat years). Or is our logic too fuzzy?  Comments? 
             

            --- On Mon, 2/2/09, Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:

            From: Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...>
            Subject: CYOA - Re: Transatlantic passage story
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 7:32 PM






            Harry,

            Yeah, plenty of vintage sailors, but even though a 1966 Pearson Triton may
            only be 42 years old, you have to adjust for the species, sort of like you
            do for dog-years. So let's see...42 years X 5 =210 in boat years.

            Alan

            Harry wrote:
            "Not as vintage as some of the sailors. There are at least three in
            Mexico right now one with a 70 plus year old skipper. There is usually
            an Atlantic crossing that I know about almost every year."

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Harry James
            We don t know what the real boat natural life limit is. Boats built in the 60 s and seventies seem to have no currently known limits. They die when their
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 3 11:53 PM
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              We don't know what the real boat natural life limit is. Boats built in
              the 60's and seventies seem to have no currently known limits. They die
              when their appearance becomes so bad that nobody loves them anymore and
              euthanasia is applied by chain saw or D-8 cat and the remains minus
              parts for organ donation are trucked off to the local land fill.

              My Triton is 48 years old with many past owners, I can see no reason why
              it should not be around at the turn of the next century. The Columbia 34
              Rondelet owned by Jack and Jean Rothrock has been fortunate in its
              ownership and looks better now then the day it left the factory 38 years
              ago.

              By the way I think Alan's conversion was 1/5 not 5, ie 1 human year
              equals 5 boat years.

              HJ

              Stephen Williams wrote:
              > Upon reading Alan's message below, we began discussing just exactly how it is that an interested party might determine "boat years". We assume {yeah, I know how to disect that word too, and yes, we do have too much time on our hands around here} that before beginning, one must have some established and agreed upon number for the average years that a sailboat "lives". I read something sometime about the lifespan of small wooden sailboats, but once barrier coated, and avoiding major catastrophe, it seems that a fiberglass sailboat should just about last forever........but they don't do they? Catastrophe and neglect do occur. Still.....my 8.7 will undoubtedly last longer than I. If we pick 66.12 as average human lifespan worldwide, and Alan arbitrarily picks "5" as the number of human lifespans that a sailboat would last, shouldn't it be that a 42 year old Triton would only be in it's adolescence, perhaps much, much younger (8 in boat years,
              > while a 90 year old man would be 297 in boat years). Or is our logic too fuzzy? Comments?
              >
              >
              > --- On Mon, 2/2/09, Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: Alan Clendinen <alanclendinen@...>
              > Subject: CYOA - Re: Transatlantic passage story
              > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Monday, February 2, 2009, 7:32 PM
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Harry,
              >
              > Yeah, plenty of vintage sailors, but even though a 1966 Pearson Triton may
              > only be 42 years old, you have to adjust for the species, sort of like you
              > do for dog-years. So let's see...42 years X 5 =210 in boat years.
              >
              > Alan
              >
              > Harry wrote:
              > "Not as vintage as some of the sailors. There are at least three in
              > Mexico right now one with a 70 plus year old skipper. There is usually
              > an Atlantic crossing that I know about almost every year."
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Alan Clendinen
              Stephen, Ah, it s more complicated than that. To further muddy the boat-years waters, you would have to take into account the manufacturer/model of boat.
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 4 2:11 AM
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                Stephen,

                Ah, it's more complicated than that. To further muddy the boat-years waters,
                you would have to take into account the manufacturer/model of boat. Vintage
                Pearsons such as that 1966 Triton were built like tanks, so they would have
                a lower number value to multiply with year of manufacture.

                If you were wanting to calculate the boat-years for a boat having a
                reputation for lower quality, (example: Catalina) you would need to use a
                higher number. So if we use 5 for a Triton, a Catalina would use 10.

                The resulting calculations for a 42 year-old Catalina (assuming there are
                any Catalinas that old) would be 420 boat-years, and believe me, a 42
                year-old Catalina would look like it was 420 years old.

                The higher quality Triton would look much younger for its 42 years in the
                harsh saltwater environment, and that is why she gets a boat-years value of
                210 (5 X 42)

                To further muddy the waters, you would have to take into account the
                maintenance records of the boat in question, and I won't even go
                there...smoke is starting to come out of my ears. ;)

                Alan


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
                Allen, It is more complicated as you state. There are too many significant variables for a general formula. Salt water - fresh water, raced - coastal cruised,
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 4 8:39 AM
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                  Allen,
                  It is more complicated as you state. There are too many significant
                  variables for a general formula. Salt water - fresh water, raced - coastal cruised,
                  Lake Havasu - Marina Del Ray, Dry sailed - moored in the Chesapeake. However,
                  the formula might have merit when comparing boats from the same area. Boats
                  of the Chesapeake, boats of Southern California, boats of Puget Sound, boats of
                  the Southwest, boats of Florida, etc. Each region has it's own peculiar ways
                  and paths to prove the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and certain designs and
                  constructions are better or less able to stave of the inevitable. A well built
                  wooden hull will last 50 + years in Maryland if painted and varnished on a
                  regular basis. Out here, it would disassemble itself in three years no mater what
                  you did.

                  Bruce K
                  Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                  Los Lunas, NM


                  >
                  >
                  > Stephen,
                  >
                  > Ah, it's more complicated than that. To further muddy the boat-years waters,
                  >
                  > you would have to take into account the manufacturer/model of boat. Vintage
                  > Pearsons such as that 1966 Triton were built like tanks, so they would have
                  > a lower number value to multiply with year of manufacture.
                  >
                  > If you were wanting to calculate the boat-years for a boat having a
                  > reputation for lower quality, (example: Catalina) you would need to use a
                  > higher number. So if we use 5 for a Triton, a Catalina would use 10.
                  >
                  > The resulting calculations for a 42 year-old Catalina (assuming there are
                  > any Catalinas that old) would be 420 boat-years, and believe me, a 42
                  > year-old Catalina would look like it was 420 years old.
                  >
                  > The higher quality Triton would look much younger for its 42 years in the
                  > harsh saltwater environment, and that is why she gets a boat-years value of
                  > 210 (5 X 42)
                  >
                  > To further muddy the waters, you would have to take into account the
                  > maintenance records of the boat in question, and I won't even go
                  > there...smoke is starting to come out of my ears. ;)
                  >
                  > Alan
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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