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RE: CYOA - Sea Dogs

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  • Lookoutnw
    Haf, My dog a Shepherd Husky XX (low brid) mix was great company on the Chrysler 22. Heeling, the boat, sailing, motoring whatever. She shakes and will jump
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 31, 2008
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      Haf,
      My dog a Shepherd Husky XX (low brid) mix was great company on the Chrysler
      22. Heeling, the boat, sailing, motoring whatever. She shakes and will
      jump off DT n a heart beat. She will learn as shortly she will be living on
      it during the week with me. She only has a couple of years left anyway.
      Same way with trucks, S10 was great, the Stepvan same situation, shakes and
      wants out. Actually jumped out the window when stopped. Bad ankle now.
      Kinda just like me…

      Jim & Chong Lussier
      KE7YOP
      SV Dawn Treader
      74 Columbia / Sailcrafter 45 #201
      Olympia, Wa

      -----Original Message-----
      From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of haf_jonsson
      Sent: Wednesday, December 31, 2008 7:49 PM
      To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: CYOA - Sea Dogs

      Happy New Year everyone.

      Today I went sailing and brought a dog with me. I'm babysitting it
      for my son and for most parts it is fine with me. But on the water the
      animal went nuts. He was squeeling and hauling and trembling in fear
      all the time. I returned early, but as I slid into the slip the animal
      jumped and landed in the water, and nearly got itself squished between
      the boat and the dock.
      In the past I have sailed with a guy who had a dog and it never was
      trouble. I wonder if different breeds have different hang-ups about
      sailing. This one is an Australian Red Heeler, and is absolutely
      delightful on the trails. But, on the water it was not happy.
      My question is: Do different types of dogs adapt more easily than
      others to sailing? The next question is: How do you break a dog in to
      like going sailing?

      Haf

      Quintessence, C-28, #388
      Monterey, CA



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
      Watt, Absolutely, When the dog gets you up at first dawn and drags you out of a warm, snugly bed, you hook your best friend(s) to a leash and head out for the
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
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        Watt,
        Absolutely, When the dog gets you up at first dawn and drags you out of a
        warm, snugly bed, you hook your best friend(s) to a leash and head out for the
        morning walk. As you are leaving, you suggest a few easy tasks to be done
        before you get back from the odious, but necessary task of walking the dog(s). Do
        not forget to emphasis division of labor and when you get back from the walk,
        mention the harrowing escapes from coyotes, javelina, and a few missed snake
        strikes. (Leave out the clear, crisp air, the deer you bounced, the smell of
        damp misquite and sage, the chollia and ocotillo flowers just coming out, dull
        stuff like that). But always leave it up to her to choose which morning chores
        she would like to do.

        Bruce K
        Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
        Los Lunas, NM


        >
        >
        > Bruce,
        >
        > Any advice on training "The Admiral" to do some work while she is on the
        > boat?
        > (Grin)
        >
        > Watt Jones
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
        James, This brings up and interesting anecdote. A sailing friend of mine, (The one with the Standard Poodle), used to work for the Secret Service and he could
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          James,
          This brings up and interesting anecdote. A sailing friend of mine, (The
          one with the Standard Poodle), used to work for the Secret Service and he could
          ski! Whenever President Ford went to Vail, he was assigned to the detail. One
          night, they had just checked into Condo One and were doing a little world
          business when the President's Golden Retriever, "Liberty" did hers on the rug. My
          friend got up to deal with it, but the President stood up and said, "Please,
          sit down. No man should have to clean up after another man's dog."; and took
          care of it.


          Bruce K
          Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
          Los Lunas, NM

          >
          >
          > I have to admit, Haf, that those questions never occured to me. The only
          > questions I ever had about pets on boats are, and I quote: "where do they crap,
          > and who gets to clean it up?"
          > James R. Muri
          >
          > Novelist, Sailor
          > BUY: My e-Novels at http://blizzardguy.com/venture/
          > SITE: http://blizzardguy.com
          > BLOG: http://theostrichkiller.blogspot.com
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Carol Voss
          Haf, Bruce is right: Generally speaking, a dog s behavior in a car is loosely predictive of how they will act on a boat. A short leash, firmly attached to a
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Haf, Bruce is right: Generally speaking, a dog's behavior in a car is
            loosely predictive of how they will act on a boat.



            A short leash, firmly attached to a stationary point on the boat, is
            essential to keeping a dog aboard when in port. Be sure the leash is NOT
            long enough to allow the dog to reach the gunwales, he may strangle himself
            if he goes over.



            Labradors and Golden Retrievers are notorious for loving the water, but you
            may have a hard time keeping them from jumping in for a swim.



            As far as introducing a dog to sailing, this has to be done in stages.
            Obviously, pick relatively calm times. The first time just let the dog go
            aboard and investigate, and hang out for awhile with the dog without leaving
            port (I know, tough for us to do.) Get him used to the sights, sounds,
            smells, and motion of the boat in the slip. The next time, start the engine
            and let the dog get used to that idea. Then head out briefly (less than a
            half hour,) and see how he likes it. Use plenty of praise and petting, this
            is not something you want to try while sailing single-handed. Someone has
            to pretty much be praising and petting the dog continuously until he
            demonstrates that he likes the boat and the idea of sailing.



            The life vest is indispensable: A few years ago, a dog was found afloat in
            one, and alive; he had been on a boat that had sunk (along with the owner.)
            One of the Coasties adopted the "orphaned" dog.



            I don't have any real answers for messes: Just get it cleaned up before it
            hits the bilge! Pet Smart has puppy training pads, but an older dog may or
            may not use them. They're pretty particular about where they "go." My
            current dog eliminates on command, and has managed to learn that he should
            piddle off the leeward gunwale!



            Carol Voss

            C26Mk II # 255 "Puffin"



            _____

            From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kbjmjrb@...
            Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2009 10:30 AM
            To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: CYOA - Sea Dogs



            Haf,
            I've never seen any breed preference. I commonly sail with at least one and
            sometimes three Belgian Tervuerens. Others on the dock have Standard
            Poodles,
            Airedales, Dachshunds, Chihuahuas, German Short-hairs, all sorts of dogs. I
            think it is individual specific, like dogs that get real nervous when riding
            in
            a car. There is a variety of nonprescription supplements called calming aids

            available through pet supply stores or veterinary clinics which are intended

            to help with this and other common stress situations like thunder storms.
            It's
            hard to say just why the dog was nervous. It could be the motion of the
            boat,
            the noise of the engine, being confined below, or what. Some of my dogs
            prefer
            the foredeck, others just rack out below. I have several recommendations in
            general. Put a good quality life jacket on the pet. It should buckle on the
            top, (the ones that buckle under the belly are too hard to put on), and it
            should
            have a harness ring. I personally have a harness on the dogs at all times
            around the lake anyway. It should be strong and secure enough to attach a
            line
            and lift the pet back aboard. At, or near the dock, tie the pet to something
            or
            confine them below. If you sail regularly with a pet, get them their own
            gear
            bag with everything needed. I keep a dedicated set of brushes, leashes,
            boots,
            food dishes, medicines, etc. in a bag ready to go. Getting a dog to poop in
            the cockpit or on the deck is tough. I lucked out because I had a dog that
            would basically go on command because I trained him to do so while on long
            driving
            trips. Once the others saw that it was OK, they would also do so. One fellow

            with a Standard Poodle tried all sorts of things, like having him pee on a
            bush on shore and then bring the bush aboard but never did have much luck.
            Most
            cruisers just figure on a shore trip in the morning and evening. One friend
            took her Lhasa Apso on a month long cruise around Victoria Island on her
            Ranger
            32 and basically, that worked, but, of course, she was always in sight of
            land.
            Dogs do take a little extra effort to work out as sailing companions, but
            they're not as much trouble as kids

            Bruce K
            Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
            Los Lunas, NM >
            >
            >
            > Happy New Year everyone.
            >
            > Today I went sailing and brought a dog with me. I'm babysitting it
            > for my son and for most parts it is fine with me. But on the water the
            > animal went nuts. He was squeeling and hauling and trembling in fear
            > all the time. I returned early, but as I slid into the slip the animal
            > jumped and landed in the water, and nearly got itself squished between
            > the boat and the dock.
            > In the past I have sailed with a guy who had a dog and it never was
            > trouble. I wonder if different breeds have different hang-ups about
            > sailing. This one is an Australian Red Heeler, and is absolutely
            > delightful on the trails. But, on the water it was not happy.
            > My question is: Do different types of dogs adapt more easily than
            > others to sailing? The next question is: How do you break a dog in to
            > like going sailing?
            >
            > Haf
            >
            > Quintessence, C-28, #388
            > Monterey, CA
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ratherbnnc@aol.com
            Thanks Bruce! Now that sounds like a place i would like to live In a message dated 1/1/2009 1:22:09 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, Kbjmjrb@cs.com
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
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              Thanks Bruce! Now that sounds like a place i would like to live <grin>




              In a message dated 1/1/2009 1:22:09 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
              Kbjmjrb@... writes:




              Watt,
              Absolutely, When the dog gets you up at first dawn and drags you out of a
              warm, snugly bed, you hook your best friend(s) to a leash and head out for
              the
              morning walk. As you are leaving, you suggest a few easy tasks to be done
              before you get back from the odious, but necessary task of walking the
              dog(s). Do
              not forget to emphasis division of labor and when you get back from the
              walk,
              mention the harrowing escapes from coyotes, javelina, and a few missed snake
              strikes. (Leave out the clear, crisp air, the deer you bounced, the smell of
              damp misquite and sage, the chollia and ocotillo flowers just coming out,
              dull
              stuff like that). But always leave it up to her to choose which morning
              chores
              she would like to do.

              Bruce K
              Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
              Los Lunas, NM


              >
              >
              > Bruce,
              >
              > Any advice on training "The Admiral" to do some work while she is on the
              > boat?
              > (Grin)
              >
              > Watt Jones
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              **************New year...new news. Be the first to know what is making
              headlines. (http://www.aol.com/?ncid=emlcntaolcom00000026)


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ratherbnnc@aol.com
              Maybe someone should call that Cesar Milan guy Dog Whisperer on A&E or the TLC. He seems to know everything! haha In a message dated 1/1/2009 2:22:38
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
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                Maybe someone should call that Cesar Milan guy " Dog Whisperer" on A&E or
                the TLC. He seems to know everything! haha


                In a message dated 1/1/2009 2:22:38 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
                rustyrusticator@... writes:




                Haf, Bruce is right: Generally speaking, a dog's behavior in a car is
                loosely predictive of how they will act on a boat.

                A short leash, firmly attached to a stationary point on the boat, is
                essential to keeping a dog aboard when in port. Be sure the leash is NOT
                long enough to allow the dog to reach the gunwales, he may strangle himself
                if he goes over.

                Labradors and Golden Retrievers are notorious for loving the water, but you
                may have a hard time keeping them from jumping in for a swim.

                As far as introducing a dog to sailing, this has to be done in stages.
                Obviously, pick relatively calm times. The first time just let the dog go
                aboard and investigate, and hang out for awhile with the dog without leaving
                port (I know, tough for us to do.) Get him used to the sights, sounds,
                smells, and motion of the boat in the slip. The next time, start the engine
                and let the dog get used to that idea. Then head out briefly (less than a
                half hour,) and see how he likes it. Use plenty of praise and petting, this
                is not something you want to try while sailing single-handed. Someone has
                to pretty much be praising and petting the dog continuously until he
                demonstrates that he likes the boat and the idea of sailing.

                The life vest is indispensable: A few years ago, a dog was found afloat in
                one, and alive; he had been on a boat that had sunk (along with the owner.)
                One of the Coasties adopted the "orphaned" dog.

                I don't have any real answers for messes: Just get it cleaned up before it
                hits the bilge! Pet Smart has puppy training pads, but an older dog may or
                may not use them. They're pretty particular about where they "go." My
                current dog eliminates on command, and has managed to learn that he should
                piddle off the leeward gunwale!

                Carol Voss

                C26Mk II # 255 "Puffin"

                _____

                From: _columbiasailingyachcolumbiasailingcol_
                (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com)
                [mailto:_columbiasailingyachcolumbiasailingcol_
                (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com) ] On Behalf Of _Kbjmjrb@..._ (mailto:Kbjmjrb@...)
                Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2009 10:30 AM
                To: _columbiasailingyachcolumbiasailingcol_
                (mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com)
                Subject: Re: CYOA - Sea Dogs

                Haf,
                I've never seen any breed preference. I commonly sail with at least one and
                sometimes three Belgian Tervuerens. Others on the dock have Standard
                Poodles,
                Airedales, Dachshunds, Chihuahuas, German Short-hairs, all sorts of dogs. I
                think it is individual specific, like dogs that get real nervous when riding
                in
                a car. There is a variety of nonprescription supplements called calming aids

                available through pet supply stores or veterinary clinics which are intended

                to help with this and other common stress situations like thunder storms.
                It's
                hard to say just why the dog was nervous. It could be the motion of the
                boat,
                the noise of the engine, being confined below, or what. Some of my dogs
                prefer
                the foredeck, others just rack out below. I have several recommendations in
                general. Put a good quality life jacket on the pet. It should buckle on the
                top, (the ones that buckle under the belly are too hard to put on), and it
                should
                have a harness ring. I personally have a harness on the dogs at all times
                around the lake anyway. It should be strong and secure enough to attach a
                line
                and lift the pet back aboard. At, or near the dock, tie the pet to something
                or
                confine them below. If you sail regularly with a pet, get them their own
                gear
                bag with everything needed. I keep a dedicated set of brushes, leashes,
                boots,
                food dishes, medicines, etc. in a bag ready to go. Getting a dog to poop in
                the cockpit or on the deck is tough. I lucked out because I had a dog that
                would basically go on command because I trained him to do so while on long
                driving
                trips. Once the others saw that it was OK, they would also do so. One fellow

                with a Standard Poodle tried all sorts of things, like having him pee on a
                bush on shore and then bring the bush aboard but never did have much luck.
                Most
                cruisers just figure on a shore trip in the morning and evening. One friend
                took her Lhasa Apso on a month long cruise around Victoria Island on her
                Ranger
                32 and basically, that worked, but, of course, she was always in sight of
                land.
                Dogs do take a little extra effort to work out as sailing companions, but
                they're not as much trouble as kids

                Bruce K
                Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                Los Lunas, NM >
                >
                >
                > Happy New Year everyone.
                >
                > Today I went sailing and brought a dog with me. I'm babysitting it
                > for my son and for most parts it is fine with me. But on the water the
                > animal went nuts. He was squeeling and hauling and trembling in fear
                > all the time. I returned early, but as I slid into the slip the animal
                > jumped and landed in the water, and nearly got itself squished between
                > the boat and the dock.
                > In the past I have sailed with a guy who had a dog and it never was
                > trouble. I wonder if different breeds have different hang-ups about
                > sailing. This one is an Australian Red Heeler, and is absolutely
                > delightful on the trails. But, on the water it was not happy.
                > My question is: Do different types of dogs adapt more easily than
                > others to sailing? The next question is: How do you break a dog in to
                > like going sailing?
                >
                > Haf
                >
                > Quintessence, C-28, #388
                > Monterey, CA
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                **************New year...new news. Be the first to know what is making
                headlines. (http://www.aol.com/?ncid=emlcntaolcom00000026)


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Joel
                Yes, dogs are a funny lot. I have a mixed breed (lab and spaniel) dog who lives aboard with me full time. She absolutely loves the water. She loves riding in
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yes, dogs are a funny lot. I have a mixed breed (lab and spaniel) dog
                  who lives aboard with me full time. She absolutely loves the water.
                  She loves riding in the truck too... either inside or short-leashed
                  in the bed. She has learned to do both num #1 & #2 on the bow.

                  But, just let me start the engine and she starts pacing...while
                  underway she will pace the circumference continually. I have a float
                  coat for her and that calms her some...

                  Final solution... a vet recommended and wrote a script for doggie
                  downers. Give them to her an hour before setting sail and she will
                  find her bed. Have heard Benedryl will have same affect but have not
                  tried it. She never gets seasick but does not like neither the engine
                  running nor being underway under sail. As soon as we anchor she is
                  fine again.

                  We live with it.. but next one will be started as a pup on the
                  boat...and will also be a shedless breed...maybe a labradoodle?

                  Joel Wilkins
                  m/s Miss Magoo
                  C-45, #98
                  S. Pasadena, FL
                • jeff talbut
                  -All of my dogs have been started young, one when I was living aboard. Started training on papers in a crate, progressed to a door mat that I attached to a
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 1, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    -All of my dogs have been started young, one when I was living aboard.
                    Started training on papers in a crate, progressed to a door mat that I
                    attached to a line(kick it over board to flush) I had a friend that
                    showed dogs, so that they wouldn't squat in the ring he would take
                    them behind the building and stick a matchstick up their back
                    side...instant response. My current dog doesn't like vibration under
                    foot, boat motor when its running, rumble strips when in the car, my
                    other ones grew up in CA and got used to the ground moving under their
                    feet occasionally. I put nets in the lifelines and a short lead on the
                    harness, just long enough to get over the rail, but not into the
                    water, they jump once, dangle for a while, are very grateful to be
                    pulled back aboard and seldom jump again...as long as you leave them
                    dangle for a bit and don't act too exited about the whole thing. You
                    might try leaving the motor run at the dock for a while to get them
                    used to it, before getting underway.JT

                    -- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "Carol Voss"
                    <rustyrusticator@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Haf, Bruce is right: Generally speaking, a dog's behavior in a car is
                    > loosely predictive of how they will act on a boat.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > A short leash, firmly attached to a stationary point on the boat, is
                    > essential to keeping a dog aboard when in port. Be sure the leash
                    is NOT
                    > long enough to allow the dog to reach the gunwales, he may strangle
                    himself
                    > if he goes over.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Labradors and Golden Retrievers are notorious for loving the water,
                    but you
                    > may have a hard time keeping them from jumping in for a swim.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > As far as introducing a dog to sailing, this has to be done in stages.
                    > Obviously, pick relatively calm times. The first time just let the
                    dog go
                    > aboard and investigate, and hang out for awhile with the dog without
                    leaving
                    > port (I know, tough for us to do.) Get him used to the sights, sounds,
                    > smells, and motion of the boat in the slip. The next time, start
                    the engine
                    > and let the dog get used to that idea. Then head out briefly (less
                    than a
                    > half hour,) and see how he likes it. Use plenty of praise and
                    petting, this
                    > is not something you want to try while sailing single-handed.
                    Someone has
                    > to pretty much be praising and petting the dog continuously until he
                    > demonstrates that he likes the boat and the idea of sailing.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > The life vest is indispensable: A few years ago, a dog was found
                    afloat in
                    > one, and alive; he had been on a boat that had sunk (along with the
                    owner.)
                    > One of the Coasties adopted the "orphaned" dog.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I don't have any real answers for messes: Just get it cleaned up
                    before it
                    > hits the bilge! Pet Smart has puppy training pads, but an older dog
                    may or
                    > may not use them. They're pretty particular about where they "go." My
                    > current dog eliminates on command, and has managed to learn that he
                    should
                    > piddle off the leeward gunwale!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Carol Voss
                    >
                    > C26Mk II # 255 "Puffin"
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > _____
                    >
                    > From: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                    > [mailto:columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kbjmjrb@...
                    > Sent: Thursday, January 01, 2009 10:30 AM
                    > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: CYOA - Sea Dogs
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Haf,
                    > I've never seen any breed preference. I commonly sail with at least
                    one and
                    > sometimes three Belgian Tervuerens. Others on the dock have Standard
                    > Poodles,
                    > Airedales, Dachshunds, Chihuahuas, German Short-hairs, all sorts of
                    dogs. I
                    > think it is individual specific, like dogs that get real nervous
                    when riding
                    > in
                    > a car. There is a variety of nonprescription supplements called
                    calming aids
                    >
                    > available through pet supply stores or veterinary clinics which are
                    intended
                    >
                    > to help with this and other common stress situations like thunder
                    storms.
                    > It's
                    > hard to say just why the dog was nervous. It could be the motion of the
                    > boat,
                    > the noise of the engine, being confined below, or what. Some of my dogs
                    > prefer
                    > the foredeck, others just rack out below. I have several
                    recommendations in
                    > general. Put a good quality life jacket on the pet. It should buckle
                    on the
                    > top, (the ones that buckle under the belly are too hard to put on),
                    and it
                    > should
                    > have a harness ring. I personally have a harness on the dogs at all
                    times
                    > around the lake anyway. It should be strong and secure enough to
                    attach a
                    > line
                    > and lift the pet back aboard. At, or near the dock, tie the pet to
                    something
                    > or
                    > confine them below. If you sail regularly with a pet, get them their own
                    > gear
                    > bag with everything needed. I keep a dedicated set of brushes, leashes,
                    > boots,
                    > food dishes, medicines, etc. in a bag ready to go. Getting a dog to
                    poop in
                    > the cockpit or on the deck is tough. I lucked out because I had a
                    dog that
                    > would basically go on command because I trained him to do so while
                    on long
                    > driving
                    > trips. Once the others saw that it was OK, they would also do so.
                    One fellow
                    >
                    > with a Standard Poodle tried all sorts of things, like having him
                    pee on a
                    > bush on shore and then bring the bush aboard but never did have much
                    luck.
                    > Most
                    > cruisers just figure on a shore trip in the morning and evening. One
                    friend
                    > took her Lhasa Apso on a month long cruise around Victoria Island on her
                    > Ranger
                    > 32 and basically, that worked, but, of course, she was always in
                    sight of
                    > land.
                    > Dogs do take a little extra effort to work out as sailing
                    companions, but
                    > they're not as much trouble as kids
                    >
                    > Bruce K
                    > Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                    > Los Lunas, NM >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Happy New Year everyone.
                    > >
                    > > Today I went sailing and brought a dog with me. I'm babysitting it
                    > > for my son and for most parts it is fine with me. But on the water
                    the
                    > > animal went nuts. He was squeeling and hauling and trembling in fear
                    > > all the time. I returned early, but as I slid into the slip the
                    animal
                    > > jumped and landed in the water, and nearly got itself squished
                    between
                    > > the boat and the dock.
                    > > In the past I have sailed with a guy who had a dog and it never was
                    > > trouble. I wonder if different breeds have different hang-ups about
                    > > sailing. This one is an Australian Red Heeler, and is absolutely
                    > > delightful on the trails. But, on the water it was not happy.
                    > > My question is: Do different types of dogs adapt more easily than
                    > > others to sailing? The next question is: How do you break a dog in to
                    > > like going sailing?
                    > >
                    > > Haf
                    > >
                    > > Quintessence, C-28, #388
                    > > Monterey, CA
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • lookoutnw@comcast.net
                    I have found that most Pet Meds are the same as us meds but with different names.  My son in a Pharm Tech and gives me the Let me fuzz dad s brain with all
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jan 2, 2009
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                      I have found that most 'Pet Meds' are the same as us meds but with different names.  My son in a Pharm Tech and gives me the 'Let me fuzz dad's brain with all this chemical name crap' whenever we talk about it.  I guess he is just getting back at me for all those years of mechanical parts & repair and stuff.





                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Joel" <cruiser6003@...>
                      To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, January 1, 2009 7:23:21 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
                      Subject: CYOA - Re: Sea Dogs






                      Yes, dogs are a funny lot. I have a mixed breed (lab and spaniel) dog
                      who lives aboard with me full time. She absolutely loves the water.
                      She loves riding in the truck too... either inside or short-leashed
                      in the bed. She has learned to do both num #1 & #2 on the bow.

                      But, just let me start the engine and she starts pacing...while
                      underway she will pace the circumference continually. I have a float
                      coat for her and that calms her some...

                      Final solution... a vet recommended and wrote a script for doggie
                      downers. Give them to her an hour before setting sail and she will
                      find her bed. Have heard Benedryl will have same affect but have not
                      tried it. She never gets seasick but does not like neither the engine
                      running nor being underway under sail. As soon as we anchor she is
                      fine again.

                      We live with it.. but next one will be started as a pup on the
                      boat...and will also be a shedless breed...maybe a labradoodle?

                      Joel Wilkins
                      m/s Miss Magoo
                      C-45, #98
                      S. Pasadena, FL



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Kbjmjrb@cs.com
                      One thing about dogs is that everything is training, some positive, some negative, even when you are not actually in a training session. For example, never
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jan 2, 2009
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                        One thing about dogs is that everything is training, some positive, some
                        negative, even when you are not actually in a training session. For example, never
                        take a dog for a walk and, as soon as he does his business, turn around and
                        go home An exception here may be if it is raining and thundering and going back
                        is considered a reward.


                        Bruce K
                        Challenger # 74, "Ouroboros"
                        Los Lunas, NM

                        >
                        >
                        > Haf, Bruce is right: Generally speaking, a dog's behavior in a car is
                        > loosely predictive of how they will act on a boat.
                        >
                        > A short leash, firmly attached to a stationary point on the boat, is
                        > essential to keeping a dog aboard when in port. Be sure the leash is NOT
                        > long enough to allow the dog to reach the gunwales, he may strangle himself
                        > if he goes over.
                        >
                        > Labradors and Golden Retrievers are notorious for loving the water, but you
                        > may have a hard time keeping them from jumping in for a swim.
                        >
                        > As far as introducing a dog to sailing, this has to be done in stages.
                        > Obviously, pick relatively calm times. The first time just let the dog go
                        > aboard and investigate, and hang out for awhile with the dog without leaving
                        > port (I know, tough for us to do.) Get him used to the sights, sounds,
                        > smells, and motion of the boat in the slip. The next time, start the engine
                        > and let the dog get used to that idea. Then head out briefly (less than a
                        > half hour,) and see how he likes it. Use plenty of praise and petting, this
                        > is not something you want to try while sailing single-handed. Someone has
                        > to pretty much be praising and petting the dog continuously until he
                        > demonstrates that he likes the boat and the idea of sailing.
                        >
                        > The life vest is indispensable: A few years ago, a dog was found afloat in
                        > one, and alive; he had been on a boat that had sunk (along with the owner.)
                        > One of the Coasties adopted the "orphaned" dog.
                        >
                        > I don't have any real answers for messes: Just get it cleaned up before it
                        > hits the bilge! Pet Smart has puppy training pads, but an older dog may or
                        > may not use them. They're pretty particular about where they "go." My
                        > current dog eliminates on command, and has managed to learn that he should
                        > piddle off the leeward gunwale!
                        >
                        > Carol Voss
                        >
                        > C26Mk II # 255 "Puffin"
                        >
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Patricia Noonan
                        Have had the same experience with several people I ve taken sailing...lol. I think it has to do with the personality... my little mut spike loves the water
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jan 2, 2009
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                          Have had the same experience with several people I've taken
                          sailing...lol. I think it has to do with the personality...
                          my little mut "spike" loves the water and I had another one that just
                          loved the boat..
                          --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, "haf_jonsson"
                          <haf_jonsson@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Happy New Year everyone.
                          >
                          > Today I went sailing and brought a dog with me. I'm babysitting
                          it
                          > for my son and for most parts it is fine with me. But on the water
                          the
                          > animal went nuts. He was squeeling and hauling and trembling in
                          fear
                          > all the time. I returned early, but as I slid into the slip the
                          animal
                          > jumped and landed in the water, and nearly got itself squished
                          between
                          > the boat and the dock.
                          > In the past I have sailed with a guy who had a dog and it never
                          was
                          > trouble. I wonder if different breeds have different hang-ups
                          about
                          > sailing. This one is an Australian Red Heeler, and is absolutely
                          > delightful on the trails. But, on the water it was not happy.
                          > My question is: Do different types of dogs adapt more easily
                          than
                          > others to sailing? The next question is: How do you break a dog in
                          to
                          > like going sailing?
                          >
                          > Haf
                          >
                          > Quintessence, C-28, #388
                          > Monterey, CA
                          >
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