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129209Re: let me have your opinions - CYOA - criag's list posting Columbia 30 $9999

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  • CJE
    Oct 4, 2011
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      Bulkheads in a boat are like bones in your body in that they grow along lines of stress. If you think about the stresses on the hull, and how they are re-directed by the existing structure, you can picture where the bulkheads should go.

      The primary force of the mast is straight down - so you need something to carry that load. The primary force of the shrouds is up - re-directed to inward by the hull - so you need something to resist crushing at that point. As the mast and shrouds are in line with each other across the hull - a single bulkhead to connect those three points with the keel would be the most convenient way to deal with the area.

      stephen
      ----------




      On Oct 4, 2011, at 11:43 AM, Larry W wrote:

      Brian,
      If you should decide to move the chainplates, the hull in that area is as thin as it gets. You'll need really beefy backer plates. My boat has never had stanchions or lifelines, so I can't really speak to that. I do miss having a bow rail, and I have had one in storage for 5 or 6 years that I keep meaning to install.
      Looking forward to more discussion as well.
      Larry Wilson

      --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, BRIAN MULLIGAN <brian.mulligan@...> wrote:
      >
      > Larry,
      > Â
      > Thanks for the tips.! I think you are correct on a lot of points. THe interior was nothing much to start with. THere is a lot of room for an improved design. One of my main design changes was going to be to put the chain plates on the outside of the hull. Plug the slots where they came through the deck originally. THere are plenty of deck leaks as well. I was thinking of leaving the life line stantions off as well. The boat looks too busy with all this gear on it and it felt cramped while sailing it. Too much stuff on board. I was going to leave the pulpits on... I think? Trying to free up some deck space.Â
      > Â
      > As for the inboard diesel, I hate outboards, but yes a small outboard is enough to push her along. Been looking at or considering the Beta Marine 16 hrs as it is small 2 lunger - easy to work on and get parts. Pricy but perhaps worth it to me if I did go cruising with her. I can always do it at a later time. THere have been many life issues to deal with as of late. Lets talk more about it soon.
      > Thanks,
      > Bria Mulligan
      > --- On Mon, 10/3/11, Larry W <radicalcy@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Larry W <radicalcy@...>
      > Subject: Re: let me your opinions - CYOA - criag's list posting Columbia 30 $9999
      > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Monday, October 3, 2011, 4:15 PM
      >
      >
      > Â
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Sounds to me like you just need a good cabinet maker to build some new panels, or take on that task. The interior furniture is the easy part. Lay in a new sole, and build from there. Bulkheads are quick and easy, as are the faces for the bunks and galley. The Sabre interior was never much to start with, so anything you replace it with would be an improvement over the original.I can make patterns of the chainplate bulkheads and the smaller bulkheads that support the bunks and serve as attachments for the facings. Let me know. It'll take me a bit as I'm recovering from some health issues, but I'm happy to help. I have a friend in Charlotte that is in the process of installing an inboard diesel. He'd be glad to pass on any info that you'd need on that front. Seems like wasted time and money to me as the outboard does an excellent job of powering the boat in any conditions though.
      > Let me know how I can help.
      > Larry
      >
      > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, BRIAN MULLIGAN <brian.mulligan@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Larry,
      > > ÂÂ
      > > That was well said. I too agonize over weather to start rebuilding my Sabre or part it out. I give some thought to putting in a diesel in board. I know it didn't ever come that way, but want to do some cruising down the road. I could part it out and get enough money to get a new / used boat. THis Sabre has a lot of nice high end race gear.  Nice new sails... new electronics, new roller ferler i.e. "Still in the Box" new swim ladder... new sheets and halyards. New winches, new blocks everywhere... 50 or so new blocks. All kind of new gear. Really nice stuff. P.O. did not pay attention and the entire cabin rotted out. Cabin sole and bulkheads are torn out. Sabre sails like no other. Really a great sailor.. Torn but don't know what direction to go.!?
      > > ÂÂ
      > > Brian Mulligan
      > > --- On Sun, 10/2/11, Larry W <radicalcy@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Larry W <radicalcy@>
      > > Subject: Re: let me your opinions - CYOA - criag's list posting Columbia 30 $9999
      > > To: columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Sunday, October 2, 2011, 3:49 PM
      > >
      > >
      > > ÂÂ
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Stephen,
      > > If you're planning to do the labor yourself, it all comes down to how much time you can commit and how good you are at planning and multi tasking.
      > > Everything takes more time than planned, and there are incredible time gaps between stages. You have to be prepared to work on several projects at once.
      > > Buy only what you need for immediate needs. This can be more expensive in the short term, but if, at some point you abandon the project, supplies that you have on hand become almost worthless.
      > > If, on the other hand, you have barrels of money, and can pay someone qualified to do the work, go for it. But know in advance that
      > > unless you are prepared to spare no expense, you'll wind up with just what you started with, and no money.
      > > The only way I know of to get a ready to go boat, is to buy one new, or close to new. A 30 year old boat, is a 30 year old boat, no matter how much work has been done on it. And unless you've done the work yourself, and know where every wire, hose and fuse is, you're going to run into problems down the road.
      > > I have operated on the idea that I want to go sailing. My 8.7 mostly allows me to do that. I do what has to be done to keep it sailing, without trying to make it a "new" boat. I don't have a fortune tied up in it, and if I have to, I can scrap it, and go on to another boat. I don't agonize over what I don't have, or wish I had. Worst case scenario, I know plenty of other people with sailboats, and if it comes to it, I can go sailing with them.
      > > Hope this helps.
      > > Larry Wilson
      > >
      > > --- In columbiasailingyachts@yahoogroups.com, CJE <cjecje1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > My C-29 is presently out of the water. The engine and so forth is all out. Over the years many little things have been neglected and as you well know; all become cumulative. As a result I now have a fair sized task in front of me.
      > > >
      > > > So when I see an ad like this I think:
      > > >
      > > > 1. Pay out $10K and I could sail away.
      > > >
      > > > 2. Part out my boat or sell it to someone with more time than money, or donate it and take the deduction.
      > > >
      > > > Basically: how long will it take me to get my boat in the water versus how fast I could count out a hundred hundreds.
      > > >
      > > > Which would you do?
      > > >
      > > > And why?
      > > >
      > > > stephen
      > > > -----------
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On Oct 2, 2011, at 2:04 PM, Christian Planton wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Columbia C-30 Sailboat Fiberglass- many upgrades - $9999 (East Hampton)
      > > > ----------------------------------------------------------
      > > > Date: 2011-10-02, 8:45AM EDT
      > > > Reply to: sale-gf5yd-2584617685@ [Errors when replying to ads?]
      > > > ----------------------------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > Columbia 30' 1972 Tall Rig Sailboat - Make Offer!!! www.sellyourboatnow.shutterfly.com/5731
      > > > LOA: 30
      > > > Beam: 9.6
      > > > Draft: 5.11
      > > > Weight: 10,000
      > > > Engine: Atomic 4 Rebuilt Engine 2001 new version, fresh water cooled
      > > > Holding Tank: 25 gallon w Y valve
      > > > Water Tank: 25 gallon fiberglass
      > > >
      > > > Heavily built Columbia sailboat with no cracks or defects in the gelcoat or chain plate issues. Will deliver vessel once sold.
      > > > Suitable for blue water sailing.
      > > > Taken care of and upgraded over the years with new wiring, new batteries, anchor winch, GPS, new sail cover, new dodger, new Sunblocker upholstery on cushions, many extras.
      > > > Well maintained Columbia 30' 1974 Tall Rig. Bill Tripp Design.
      > > > Raised deck design w fin keel.
      > > > Standard shoal keel draft. Includes a new dodger and new sail cover.
      > > > Equipped w Selden furlex 2000, 150% Genoa, 110 furling Jib, main sail 2004, Spinnaker, spinnaker pole, halyards and sheets. . All standing rigging replaced in 1998 w stainless steel.
      > > > Steel/wire halyards for main and fore sails 2005. Spray hood and bimini 2011. Teak swim platform and ladder. Fully galley, full head and interior teak like new. New Sunbrella
      > > > cushions for cabin and cockpit. Hull was scraped and painted w four coats of barrier coat and antifouling 2006. 2 Deep cycle batteries 2011. Auto tiller pilot Raymarine w fluxgate compass 2005.
      > > > Depth sounder, Plastimo compass, VHF radio 2005, CD AM/FM radio 2 speakers in cabin and 2 in cockpit. 55 Amp alternator 2005. 50 ft Shore power cord and inverter 2005. Bilge blower, bilge
      > > > water pump electric and manual. Electric windlass w up and down foot switch at bow and in cockpit 2005. 2 Danforth anchors and 8 stainless steel winches.
      > > > It has a keel stepped mast.
      > > > Everything is in good working order.
      > > >
      > > > Turnkey - In water ready to sail!!! Photos: www.sellyourboatnow.shutterfly.com Contact: Steve/Patty (631)896-6212 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (631)896-6212 end_of_the_skype_highlighting No reasonable offer refused!!!
      > > >
      > > > Location: East Hampton
      > > > it's NOT ok to contact this poster with services or other commercial interests
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > PostingID: 2584617685
      > > >
      > >
      >
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