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Street Cleaning

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  • Frank Dunn
    Before I fire off an email to CM Graham about this, a question: is it my imagination, or are the streets in Columbia Heights frequently not being cleaned each
    Message 1 of 43 , May 2 9:59 AM
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      Street Cleaning Before I fire off an email to CM Graham about this, a question:  is it my imagination, or are the streets in Columbia Heights frequently not being cleaned each week?  

      As I was coming down Newtown Street between 16th and 14th today, it appeared clear to me that the street had not been swept on the Monday side, or else it had been very poorly done.  I am quite sure that streets have not been properly cleaned on Park Road on the Monday side.  Please correct me if I am wrong.  I have a major issue with trash and cleanup in this neighborhood.

      Thanks,
      Frank Dunn
    • whj@melanet.com
      ... From: Gus Ventura Sent: Friday, May 6, 2011 3:38pm To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
      Message 43 of 43 , May 6 3:18 PM
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        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Gus Ventura" <venturagm@...>
        Sent: Friday, May 6, 2011 3:38pm
        To: "columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com" <columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: Fw: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces


        ----- Forwarded Message ----
        From: Gus Ventura <venturagm@...>
        To: whj@...
        Sent: Fri, May 6, 2011 3:35:10 PM
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        Well...William continuing to spread lies seems to be par for your nonsense.
        Columbia Heights actually enjoys more open space and green space than most other neighborhoods in DC. Meridian Hill Park is one of the largest parks in a neighborhood and has an amazing fountain and landscape. Smaller parks with children's equipment, basketball courts and water jets are sprinkled around our community. This is an urban community. If you want more green space, I understand that Prince George's County is the new suburban destination.
        I realize that William can't make out the difference between bombed out open parcels left as a legacy from rioting and development needed to create a tax base to fund city programs including social support and welfare.
        Grow up, William...the world doesn't work for free and this city can't afford your nonsense anymore. DC needs taxpayers to pay for police officers, fire fighters,
        teachers and all the other critical parts of any community.
        I think I'll call you Don Quixote from now....keep charging windmills and living in your own version of the world. Oh...and since it's likely you've never read the book, it's about a delusional individual that doesn't realize that the world has moved on with out him......sound familiar?


        From: "whj@..." <whj@...>
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, May 6, 2011 3:12:24 PM
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

         

         

        Unfortunately, some who have adopted Gus's fear based approach are not as much interested in having safer neighborhoods as they are using fear of crime as a tool to achieve socio-economic and sometimes cultural advantage.  Crime and private property rights are 2 of the few areas in which discrimination against classes of people is accepted socially and some what legally.  Which is why there is a tendency b some to take crime done by an individual and morph it into a crime of class.  I don't believe that many have a problem with those individuals who commit serious crimes being taken off the streets and being dealt with firmly.  However, the challenge comes when some want to use crimes by individual to create what I call Genny-Crow Laws.  Where the State is given power to target certain classes with nuance laws in order to favor the use of public space by one group over another. Loitering, littering, parking and etc..  A few years ago after making a big deal of nuance property abatement enforcement, CM Graham and a local neighborhood association who was making the push, worked to get a ticket which was issued to a developer fixed when he was ticked for violating the very laws this group was pushing.  Why, although the developer violated the law, he was building geared to the favorited classed.

         

        The another Genny-Crow approach is to privatize public space.  Then designing that space to favor certain classes/group over another.  When outdoor cafe comes on to public property that is the privatizing of public space.  Then you are required to by a drink to sit in that space that was once public. However, if I where to by legally by a drink somewhere and sit in that same space in public hands, I'm subject to arrest.  Starbucks and some taverns have built a business model out of loitering and semi-public loitering. The issue for some is not really not loitering or drinking in public and sometime even behavior, but who(what class) is doing it.

         

        The other approach, is to get the State/City to design public spaces in a way designed specifically to discriminate, justified by the fear of crime.  DPR did this at 14th/Oak/Ogden, 11 & Monroe and attempted it at 14th & Girard and so on. Abusing the "Friends of" paradigm.

         

        These dynamics are in part why Columbia Heights which is so diverse, has so few public spaces which consistently comes close to reflecting that diversity.   A part of my approach to building a stronger and safer community is to support building, creating and maintaining spaces which tend to reflect our diversity.  Lost favoring Gus's approach seem to seek to use fear of crime and privatization to build a Genny-Crow regime that can be enforced by the state.Hoping this will make them safe.

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Gus Ventura" <venturagm@...>
        Sent: Friday, May 6, 2011 9:38am
        To: mail@..., columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        I'm not getting a commission, and I'm happy to help engage the most effective weapon this city can offer.
        You do the crime and not only will you do the time, but you and yours will lose everything the court can get their hands on.
        Like I said earlier, game on.
        The military veteran,
        Gus Ventura


        From: David McIntire <mail@...>
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, May 6, 2011 9:28:29 AM
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

         

        Gus,

        You best look into the mirror if you wish to accuse others of verbal diarrhea.

        And you best look into the facts. The fact is that if one is on subsidized housing and a member of a household is arrested and convicted of a crime then the family can and is evicted. If a family member has a criminal record, the family is not eligible to move in, in the first place. I am on the non-profit Board of Columbia Heights Village and it happens all the time.

        No lawyer needed but perhaps you are getting a commission for your referrals – good old American capitalism where big crime leads to big profits

        Boy, something smells. I wonder what it is.

        The European (where the crime rate is a fraction of the US’s) style socialist,

        Dave McIntire

        From: Gus Ventura [mailto:venturagm@...]
        Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 8:45 AM
        To: mail@...
        Cc: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

         

        Look here you sanctimonious "think-you-know-it-all. It just so happens that there are three working class (TAX PAYING) citizens on Fairmont Street and Euclid that live between 11th and 14th (including a close friend and neighbor that lives two doors down) that have become victims of these roving band of delinquents.

        You're sounding as rational and talking out your backside as William.

        I don't care if the thug has a job or not, and I'm not interested in your apologists attitude any longer. The most dangerous weapon in this city isn't some street dreg with a gun, but an attorney. I've counseled these folks to either use my attorney or he can refer them to one of his associates.

        Game over, bud. The only thing folks ultimately understand is the impact on the pocket book. If you have no money then the civil case will get you thrown out of housing. If you are a juvenile, then your parents become liable and they will lose their housing and anything that can be seized. I don't give a rat's backside about your bleeding heart response, because the LAW ABIDING citizens THAT PAY TAXES are done accepting your empty discussions without any real progress. AND, heaven help any person or organization that aids and abets a criminal, because they just expose themselves to liability.

        The direct responses of support I'm getting by venting against this bleeding heart manure have not only been encouraging, but have made myself and MY community support know that we are no longer out numbered by the pathetic and the apologists.

        Go ahead...give your verbal diarrhea about the down trodden and how their criminal behavior is our fault. I am finally confident that much fewer folks if any are really buying your delusional socialism.



        From: David McIntire <mail@...>
        To: Gus Ventura <venturagm@...>; whj@...
        Cc: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, May 6, 2011 8:23:31 AM
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        Gus,

        Would you care to be specific on all these things you say you are doing? How many and who are these “residents” are you counseling? “0” comes to mind.

        Do you belong to a victims’ rights organization? I think not.

        Given that almost exclusively victims of violence are from the same background – victim upon victim – are you counseling youth or the homeless whom you are fond of excoriating?

        And of the rare case of a middle class person being attacked or robbed by someone and the perpetrator convicted, why would anyone even bother to sue in civil court? There is nothing to garnish or collect from a perpetrator so desperate.

        Or do you think that people with jobs are out there robbing others as well as a sideline and will go back to that job after they get out of the slammer?

        The fact of the matter that middle class residents in Columbia Heights are safer from injury than their counterparts in the suburbs who commute to DC to work if you compare the likelihood of auto accidents compared to being a victim of crime.

        In short, you are spouting nonsense. Stop watching so many Dirty Harry movies and look around you. You are conveying a very negative and false picture of what it is like to live in Columbia Heights. No one needs that! The fact that so many residents have moved here in the last decade is proof positive that what you say is simply macho posturing. That would not have happened if this were “Fort Apache, the Bronx” and you wouldn’t be living here.

        Dave McIntire

        From: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gus Ventura
        Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2011 10:48 PM
        To: whj@...
        Cc: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

         



        William, being realistic is not fear mongering and your pathetic attempts to distort common sense is not working. Things are happening in Columbia Heights that work towards middle ground trying to respect everyone's concerns. You won't get all you want and neither will I, that's what's called compromise.

         

        However. I won't compromise on crime including a wave of juvenile delinquent assaults on residents. I won't tolerate it and will work with every fiber of my being to put these thugs in away. Plus, I will counsel those that I know to be victims to follow the criminal case with a civil case, because the civil case will extract a just compensation including garnishments and collections. Something that will get a derelict parent's full attention.

        Sent from my iPhone


        On May 5, 2011, at 10:34 PM, whj@... wrote:

        Gus, I did not say you opposed the plaza. I said fear mongering like yours nearly did kill the project.  If your general position had prevailed neither would be in existence today.  It's ashamed that you don't even realize the impact of your own positions and approach.  This is why, I am raising these issues now as lessons learned.  Folk who don't have the interests of this community at heart like Donatelli Development take advantage of your community building through fear approach.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Gus Ventura" <venturagm@...>
        Sent: Thursday, May 5, 2011 7:25pm
        To: "columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com" <columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        William,

        I sent a stronger message to you personally, but I'll clear the forum air from your further lies.

        I never opposed the plaza nor did many neighbors...AND in fact, many of us were looking forward to a farmer's market on that very plaza. So stop misrepresenting neighbors and our community.

        You have a beef with Donatelli, then you take it up with them and stop dragging all of us in to the mud with you.

        Gus


        From: "whj@..." <whj@...>
        To: Richard Layman <rlaymandc@...>
        Cc: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com; erkin.ozberk@...
        Sent: Thu, May 5, 2011 6:48:48 PM
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        In your original post you mentioned the Columbia Heights Civic Plaza and Streetscape.  Having worked with a team of residents, government and to a degree developers, I know that fear mongering from people like Gus almost helped to completely derailed the plaza.  I will admit some fears were legit and were addressed in the planning. As well, the actions of Donatelli Development nearly killed the project. To be clear, only one developer in my view has acted in good faith to get it build and operational.

         

        As part of the public space trade-off with developers, the community agreed to support in their efforts to build beyond typical set-back up to the side walk line with only a 1 foot buffer between the building and the public sidewalk/public space area.  Between the 1 foot buffer and the curb, the public space would be managed by a public-private partnership between government, business owners, developers and residents/general public. As well,  public space/sidewalk would be expanded by taking some parking and or travel lanes from the roadway.  Commercial parking would be made up by the DC USA Parking Garage, and neighborhood parking addressed by a share agreement between DC USA and the community. Bike lanes would be added to streets. Traffic would be addressed by a study and full re-timing of the area to slow while allow traffic to follow.  Pedestrian safety and flow would be the first priorities.

         

        Although, Donatelli Development would get zoning support to add 2 floors to Kenyon Square and a waiver of all setbackrequirements and a reduction of commercial parking requirements, out of pure greed they wanted more.  So, they used their connections among them with CM Graham to place design efforts on hold (some of this I understand know in hind-sight). During this period they grabbed space beyond the 1 foot buffer, to use as a part of a lease agreement.  This space is now the patio for The Heights restaurant.  A portion of the revenue from this lease should be going to support maintenance of public space in Columbia Heights.  This was the first in a series of moves by this developer to grab public space to pad its bottomline, and in doing so undermining the public planning process.

         

        It's not a matter of people not knowing.  It just a world of power and greed.

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Richard Layman" <rlaymandc@...>
        Sent: Tuesday, May 3, 2011 8:38am
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com, whj@...
        Cc: erkin.ozberk@...
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        I obviously agree with you about problems in the public space and dealing with them creatively and actively.  The reality is that even if 5-10% of the behavior in public spaces is significantly negative, it crowds out the other positive behavior.  It doesn't take much.

        WRT David McIntire's points, I'd refer him to _The Future Once Happened Here_, published in the late 1990s, about the decline of cities, with a focus on NYC, LA, and DC.  The book is widely derided amongst progressives (of which I consider myself one), but I find it to be a pretty good description and a provocative read--in a good way.  Yes, middle class outmigration hurt cities significantly.  At the same time, municipal institutions were overwhelmed by dealing with social dysfunction, which Siegel in turn said was a result of massive rural outmigration to the cities, and the violent culture that came along with it. 

        Your idea about public space food courts, including the ability to consume alcoholic beverages, is interesting.  I don't know how it is working out at that court in Mt. Pleasant.  I know that all the local businesspeople, the BID, and Jonetta Rose Barras seem to be up in arms about it.  (I don't think they have alcohol.)  But the real issue is how to support a variety of ways of "consuming" the city and building entrepreneurship and opportunities.  I think it's a good idea.

        WRT community benefits as you mention, it happens I have written about this issue extensively over the years.  I argue that the reason that the process is poorly defined in DC is because this keeps costs down for developers.  But providing personal benefits--parking spaces, etc.--should never be allowed.

        http://urbanplacesandspaces.blogspot.com/2009/04/community-benefits-agreements.html

        I argue that in the process of creating neighborhood-community plans (which we don't do in DC, as small area plans are really more about managing specific opportunities for development), that consensus community priorities should be developed, and all community benefits should be targeted towards those priorities.  (My typology actually has five different categories of benefits, to which proffers can be directed.)  In the interim, ANCs could work with citizens to develop such priorities, and apply these consensus priorities to all CBA/zoning/development matters that come before them.

        Right now it's a chaotic process and for the most part, communities don't get much out of it.  Plus, the ability to get benefits is dependent on the level of community organization and connection, so the less organized and connected lose out.  I've argued this is a violation of the 14th Amendment, but the lawyers I've dropped the argument on say it's hard to prove these kinds of cases in court.

        RL

        --- On Tue, 5/3/11, whj@... <whj@...> wrote:


        From: whj@... <whj@...>
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, May 3, 2011, 8:18 AM

         

        Getting pissy drunk in public and engaging in bad behavior should not be acceptable in Columbia Heights, really no excuses.  I don't believe many no matter their station approve of folk getting pissy drunk in public and misbehaving. The police have no need for new legislation or a special program to address this problem and they should act, in particular the bad behavior part.

        Where habitual public drunkenness is an issue, the police should be able to call public health workers who are authorize to transport those persons to detox or other services. The police pouring the alcohol is a stop gap designed to discourage the drinking without taking the officer out of service and off the streets.  Between the police, other agencies, CBOs, churches and volunteers we should have such a public health program to partner with law enforcement.  The only reason we don't is the cop-out class always gives the political class an out by accepting some policing gimmick based on NY mythology.

        What CH needs to pilot are public space food courts where modest off site drinking is allowed and monitored.  Light entertainment would be cool.  They should be incorporated in commercial zones. Local businesses should partner with communities to staff and maintain these areas. Having such areas would dampen many concerns. We don't have such creativity approaches because the business/developer community under Ward 1 pay-to-play feels they don't have to partner with the community creatively. Instead they pay off the political boss.  This became clear to me as we worked to get the CH Civic Plaza and Public Realm built.  Key community groups also  found that in the short term it was easier to join the pay-to-play machine than work with neighbors for sustainable solutions.

        For example a particular citizens group negotiated for parking spaces from developer projects arranged by CM Graham in exchange for supporting projects in which other community elements would be waived.  In other words, the pay-to-play would ID certain groups to represent the entire community to the exclusion of others. In another case actually attempted to sell the 14th & Girard Park to a developer for development.

        What we are seeing now is that pay-to-play may have worked for some, but left the community short of relationships, infrastructure and resources needed to solve problems with sustainable solutions. So we repeat the same gimmicks and the same rhetoric.

         

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "David McIntire" <mail@...>
        Sent: Tuesday, May 3, 2011 1:10am
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        Gus,

        Instead of spouting nonsense about New York City, why not tell us the neighborhood(s) in DC, similar to Columbia Heights, that you find attractive and where no drug users or drunks are visible.

        The decline of DC and other cities during the 70’s and 80’s had little to do with coddling misbehavior. It had everything to do with middle class flight to the suburbs. With the rise in energy prices the flight has been reversed and the close in suburbs are now inheriting the problems as the disposed are forced out of DC.

        It’s the economic realities that drive the mass behavior of individuals, not character flaws. Law enforcement deals with the results but any lack thereof does not cause the problem and provides no cures for the economic realities that are the root causes. As they say, “it’s the economy, stupid”.

        Dave McIntire.

        From: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gus Ventura
        Sent: Monday, May 02, 2011 4:29 PM
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

         

         

        Dave,

        This is the fundamental difference between us. I'm not an apologist. Nor am I willing to let things stay wrong because somehow that's the urban culture. I believe the approach of the apologist is a huge reason why this city went in to the toilet during the 70s and 80s. It took a federal take over to flush the city government of that mentality.

        New York City also refused to continue wallowing in the crime and burnt out neighborhoods.

        Fortunately, the momentum in DC won't allow us to turn back to those dark days.

        What you see as unrealistic, I and other neighbors see as just another challenge to be addressed. This community can and will be a place where families can let their kids play in parks and not worry about some drunk or drug user. It will be a place where residents can take a stroll without fear of being assualted. In short, it will be a safe and promising community.

        I appreciate that at your core, you want to preserve space for the less fortunate. That's noble, but that doesn't require a tolerance for crime. When the issue of affordable housing surfaces, I actually agree that we must keep our communities diverse. However, that doesn't mean that I will accept some lower standard of conduct. I refuse to believe that because you're poor or financially strapped that you suddenly have an excuse to be rude or conduct yourself inappropriately.

        Like President Obama has said, "I know we can make a better place"

        Gus


        From: David McIntire <mail@...>
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, May 2, 2011 4:09:14 PM
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        Good Lord, Gus. It always amazes me how you expect real neighborhoods to be like Disneyland. In real neighborhoods, especially ones that include many incomes and cultures, some people will drink and yes some people use illegal substances. And people even curse out loud on occasion.

        If you expect otherwise, you should move to a gated community. There you can live in a completely sterile environment, and bask in the sameness. Even Goofy won’t disturb you there.

        And have you never asked yourself why, in the richest country in the world, there are so many homeless who must sleep on park benches and die an early death.

        Dave McIntire

        From: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com [mailto:columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gus Ventura
        Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2011 4:21 PM
        To: columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

         

         

        Good Lord, William. It always amazes me how quick you are to criticize everyone else, but never actually offer a legitimate solution. In all of your years in the community, you haven't been very effective dealing with the public drinking or drug dealing. Now that the community is trying some measure to curtail the public nuisance, you cry foul.

        If you have better plan, spell it out and actually provide some constructive input to the community discussion.

        Public drinking and the endless drug dealing is a major problem for our community. I would welcome a discussion that actually proposes a plan to mitigate this challenge. For now, folks are trying to make some effort to push this garbage out of the neigbhorhood.

        Let's hear a real plan, William and take a chance with a real position to address a real concern.


        From: "whj@..." <whj@...>
        To: Gus Ventura <venturagm@...>
        Cc: Columbia List Serv <columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sun, May 1, 2011 4:10:50 PM
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        This is a pure cop-out. No way is public drinking preventing this community from having quality spaces. These issues are well within our ability to handle.  The biggest hurdle is petty neighborhood politics and a misappropriation of community resources.

        The design current at 14th St/Oak/Odgen is irresponsible and was a waste of public resources.

        This still can be fixed, but not buying into this cop-out.

        William

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Gus Ventura" <venturagm@...>
        Sent: Sunday, May 1, 2011 11:40am
        To: "Columbia List Serv" <columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        Parks should be a place for the community to gather and enjoy the outdoors. Unfortunately, the community continues to struggle with public drinking and drugs.

        What should be a park bench for neighbors to sit and enjoy nature, in reality becomes a place for a drunk or drug user to sleep off their hangover. What should be a great area for neighbors and families to gather and enjoy the sunshine has become a place for derelicts and delinquents to drink alcohol and ruin the place for everyone else. If the park isn't well lit at night, then it becomes a place for drug dealers and prostitutes.

        I'm not crazy with the sterile parks and would like to see parks that will encourage greater use, but until we figure out how to deal with these nuisances and criminal activities, you can have the nicest park designed and built only to be infested with these folks.


        From: Emily <badkitty3804@...>
        To: Columbia List Serv <columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sun, May 1, 2011 10:57:52 AM
        Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces

        I unfortunately live right by the park and get the joy of seeing it
        every day. I lived there before the target went in, and saw it in a
        few phases, and the benches were the best one. Colorful, personalized
        to the neighborhood, and handy if you don't want to be crammed inside
        of your balcony free apartment.

        Did they get an intro to design student to put together those plans or
        something?

        On 5/1/11, Richard Layman <rlaymandc@...> wrote:
        > Funny that you mention the "new" park at 14th and Oak/Ogden.  I went to
        > Target on Thursday to buy a microphone for my computer and saw the redone
        > park while cycling down 14th St. and I was apalled.  I took a couple photos
        > but forgot to include one in illustrating the contrast in this particular
        > blog entry.
        >
        > I'll have to do a separate blog entry.  But obviously, the new park design
        > was produced to eliminate "loitering"--people sitting in the park.
        >
        > They should have just kept the benches but installed spikes on them.  At
        > least the park would have looked better than it does now.  Unless you like
        > the idea of a postmodern park--places that are concrete and not for
        > people...
        >
        > I am really really really really really really really really disappointed in
        > DC parks planning.  We don't have a master plan.  (One was produced during
        > the Williams Administration but was never released to the public and it was
        > never adopted.)
        >
        > We don't know what the parks dept's approach is to parks planning.  We
        > haven't had a "real" parks professional in the director's job for years and
        > years.  Etc.
        >
        > This is another example of this failure.
        >
        > Thanks, I am sorry to say, for reminding me about this.
        >
        > RL
        >
        >
        >
        > --- On Sun, 5/1/11, Emily <badkitty3804@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: Emily <badkitty3804@...>
        > Subject: Re: [columbia_heights] Sitting Outdoors and planning for small
        > public spaces
        > To: whj@..., "columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com"
        > <columbia_heights@yahoogroups.com>, "southcolumbiaheights@yahoogroups.com"
        > <southcolumbiaheights@yahoogroups.com>, "3D Substation Yahoo Group"
        > <3DSubstation@yahoogroups.com>
        > Date: Sunday, May 1, 2011, 9:39 AM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > And the mini-parks we have are done horribly. The oak/ogden park on
        >
        > 14th is just hideous. The 'seats' look like the flower holders at a
        >
        > cemetery and there is nowhere to really sit for more than 2 minutes
        >
        > since the 'seats' are angled and tiny, unless you sit down on the
        >
        > concrete.
        >
        >
        >
        > It was better off with the benches and broken concrete/gravel. Now its
        >
        > completely useless and just another spot to stare at concrete. It
        >
        > would have been nice to have a spot to enjoy the weather. Waste of
        >
        > city funds.
        >
        >
        >
        > On 5/1/11, whj@... <whj@...> wrote:
        >
        >>
        >
        >>
        >
        >> Thursday, April 28, 2011
        >
        >>
        >
        >> Sitting Outdoors and planning for small public spaces
        >
        >> by Richard Layman
        >
        >> One of the things we don't seem to do very well is plan for small public
        >
        >> spaces as part of our commercial districts and urban neighborhoods.
        >
        >>
        >
        >> It's not that there aren't small pocket parks and such, there are, but
        >
        >> often at least in DC they are the result of how diagonal avenues meet the
        >
        >> more typical street grid of blocks and streets.
        >
        >>
        >
        >> David Barth of AECOM's presentation on
        >
        >> "[http://www.glatting.com/PDF/SCAPA2008.pdf] Parks and Open Space System
        >
        >> Master Plans: Tools for Sustainable Communities" provides a framework for
        >> a
        >
        >> complete typology of parks and open spaces that a community should work to
        >
        >> plan for.
        >
        >>
        >
        >> AECOM is also doing a parks and open space plan for the Buckhead District
        >
        >> in Atlanta, which provides a more targeted list of the right kinds of
        >
        >> spaces needed in denser, urban places...
        >
        >>
        >
        >> http://urbanplacesandspaces.blogspot.com/2011/04/sitting-outdoors-and-planning-for-small.html
        >
        >>
        >
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        >
        > Sent from my mobile device
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        >

        --
        Sent from my mobile device

         



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