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RE: [columbia_heights] RE: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on Monroe Street

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  • Stephen Kline
    As I found out several weeks ago, the tree regulations are waiting approval by Corporation Counsel. If the past is prologue to the future, we can expect these
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 8, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      As I found out several weeks ago, the tree regulations are waiting approval
      by Corporation Counsel. If the past is prologue to the future, we can
      expect these regulations sometime in 2020 or therebouts. My neighbor
      recently cut down 5 legacy black walnut trees, each more than 24 inches in
      diameter. These trees were probably 125 to 150 years old. Black walnuts
      are very slow growing. Over the course of several days, the trees
      disappeared one by one.

      Comments I had from Jim Graham's office were that even if the regulations
      would have been written, it did not appear that they applied to private
      property anyway. My question is if they don't apply to private property,
      why bother? It's already against the law to cut down trees on public
      property, if for no other reason than that the cutter would be trespassing.

      The City serves it's own interests very well indeed, as exemplified by the
      3% tax on property transactions. But when it comes to the people who pay
      the taxes, we're just a cash cow.

      Stephen Kline

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jim Graham [mailto:jim@...]
      Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 8:29 AM
      To: doug.gerry@...; 'Amy Thorn'; 'Jim Graham'; 'Monroe Street
      Assoc'; 'Hugo'; 'Columbia Hts Moderated'; 'Columbia Hts'
      Cc: 'Maebry, Tremaine (COUNCIL)'
      Subject: [columbia_heights] RE: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on
      Monroe Street


      Thanks. It is a sad event indeed. I am with this email asking Tres on
      my staff to inquire about the status of the new tree regulations, and
      report back to us. Bests Jim

      I typically answer emails before 9 AM on weekdays. If you email me after
      that, it is likely that you will hear from me the next weekday. If there
      is a need to communicate prior to that, you may wish to call me.

      Jim Graham, Councilmember, Ward One, 1350 Pa. Ave., NW, #406,
      Washington, DC 20004. 202-724-8181; 202-724-8109 (fax).


      -----Original Message-----
      From: doug.gerry@... [mailto:doug.gerry@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 12:52 PM
      To: Amy Thorn; Jim Graham; Monroe Street Assoc; Hugo; Columbia Hts
      Moderated; Columbia Hts
      Subject: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on Monroe Street


      It's a sad day on Monroe Street. One of our neighbors has decided to
      destroy one of the oldest living trees in the neighborhood. Although, I
      understand that this stately tree may be pushing and breaking a
      retaining wall, the retaining wall can be rebuilt but the tree cannot.
      Among one of many detrimental effects of the destruction of this tree is
      the reduction of the value our property. Many residents on our street
      have worked very hard with the City to ensure that the new sidewalks,
      lights and paving are done properly. We are already going to loose some
      of the trees on the block due to root damage caused by replacing lead
      water lines. Yet, a neighbor can callously chop down a healthy tree. I
      hope that all of us can take a minute and consider this loss and think
      about how we can work together to prevent this type of destructive
      neighborhood activity from ever happening again. Mr. Graham, I call
      upon you to help expedite implementation of the new tree regulations.
      Thank you.
      Today, I mourn the loss of one of Monroe Street's longest living
      residents. I have included the benefits of trees, from Casey Trees web
      site, 4/7/04 http://www.caseytrees.org Cleaner Air Quality Neighborhood
      trees sustain our city. Washington, DC 's air quality may soon fail to
      meet federally mandated standards. As a result, the District may lose
      over $115 million per year in Federal Highway Administration funds,
      which currently pay for road repairs and other transportation
      infrastructure expenses.

      Local trees protect our health. In 2002, the District reported 31 days
      of unhealthy air quality. Air pollution threatens human health, keeping
      children and teachers out of school, and increases emergency room visits
      and health care costs.

      Urban trees decrease asthma-causing pollutants. Washington, DC suffers
      from the highest asthma rate in the nation. Asthma afflicts more than 1
      in 20 of our residents, including more than 10,000 children. This rate
      greatly exceeds the national average, which is less than 1 in 50 people.
      Trees filter many harmful, health-threatening pollutants from the air.
      Cleaner Water and Less Polluted Runoff Neighborhood trees reduce
      flooding. Trees greatly reduce flooding by allowing rain to seep
      naturally into the ground. The loss of tree cover in DC from 1973 to
      1997 resulted in a 34% increase in storm water runoff and a 64%
      reduction in heavy tree cover. Since much of this runoff is collected in
      the same pipes as sewage, sewer backups and basement flooding have also
      increased.

      Local trees protect our rivers. The District's rivers fail to meet
      federal water quality standards. Polluted storm water runoff and the
      discharge of raw sewage into the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers from our
      Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) system are two major reasons for this
      failure. Less than an inch of rainfall can pour sewage into our rivers.
      Trees with mature canopies can absorb the first half-inch of rainfall,
      reducing the impact of CSOs on our rivers. And the more storm water
      infiltrates into the ground, the less pollution it sweeps into our
      rivers from parking lots and streets. Increased Economic Growth
      Neighborhood trees increase property values. Residences with healthy
      trees sell for 10-20% more than those without them.

      Street trees promote tourism and encourage local business. 700,000
      tourists visit our city each year for the annual Cherry Blossom
      Festival. Visitors and local customers spend 12% more at tree-lined
      stores than at those without trees. Reduced Crime and Anxiety Street
      trees create better neighborhoods. Research has demonstrated that
      residents living in greener communities report lower levels of fear,
      less anxiety, and lower levels of crime.

      Trees help reduce stress and violence. Green spaces and trees help
      foster a sense of community, making them particularly valuable in
      inner-city neighborhoods. Studies have shown that contact with nature
      reduces the incidence of aggression and violence, and improves
      concentration in youth. Residents living in greener surroundings report
      lower levels of fear, fewer incivilities, and less violent behavior.
      Enhanced Community Life Neighborhood trees offer rest and recreation.
      Trees create natural places to sit, stroll, nap, talk, climb, and play.

      Local trees support wildlife. Many birds, small animals, and insects
      rely on trees for food and shelter.

      City trees reflect cultural values. Throughout history, trees have been
      important elements in memorials and urban design, enabling us to share
      our heritage with new generations. Relief from Summer Heat Neighborhood
      trees save energy and money. Homes with three well-placed shade trees
      enjoy summer air conditioning costs up to 40% lower than homes without
      them.

      Local trees offer haven. Tree canopies provide refreshing shade for
      parks, streets, and parking lots.

      Street trees cool down the city. City temperatures typically average 10
      degrees higher than suburban temperatures. In 2002 in the District, more
      than half the days from June through August were above 90 degrees. In
      addition to providing shade, trees emit water vapor that cools hot air.

      Urban forests slow climate change. By lowering temperatures, urban trees
      reduce our energy consumption and decrease power plant emissions that
      contribute to global climate change. Urban trees also use photosynthesis
      to rid the atmosphere of carbon dioxide, the primary gas responsible for
      global warming. Improved Well-Being Neighborhood trees aid growth and
      health. Children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders
      (ADHD) are better able to concentrate, complete tasks, and follow
      directions after playing in natural, outdoor "green spaces." Natural
      environments improve adult health, as well: patients return home more
      quickly from hospitals where trees are visible.

      Local trees improve the view. Trees help reduce the visual impact of the
      manufactured environment and poor development. Trees add human scale to
      large buildings and projects, screen unsightly areas, and add beauty
      throughout our community.

      City trees provide peace of mind. Trees and green spaces in our
      neighborhoods help relieve the stresses of a changing world and the
      everyday pressures of crowding and noise.



      Yahoo! Groups Links









      URL to this page on the web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/columbia_heights/

      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • David McIntire
      Walnut trees have the disadvantage that nothing, except grass, will grow under them - flowers etc. They poison the soil somehow. Not good for someone who wants
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 8, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Walnut trees have the disadvantage that nothing, except grass, will grow under them - flowers etc. They poison the soil somehow. Not good for someone who wants to garden under them. They are not good City trees. I imagine that is why they were cut.
         
        Buy I'm with you. Walnuts are a favorite tree of mine, they are slow growing, and if there are tree rules they should apply to private property.
         
        Dave McIntire
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 9:01 AM
        Subject: RE: [columbia_heights] RE: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on Monroe Street

        As I found out several weeks ago, the tree regulations are waiting approval
        by Corporation Counsel.  If the past is prologue to the future, we can
        expect these regulations sometime in 2020 or therebouts.  My neighbor
        recently cut down 5 legacy black walnut trees, each more than 24 inches in
        diameter.  These trees were probably 125 to 150 years old.  Black walnuts
        are very slow growing.  Over the course of several days, the trees
        disappeared one by one.

        Comments I had from Jim Graham's office were that even if the regulations
        would have been written, it did not appear that they applied to private
        property anyway.  My question is if they don't apply to private property,
        why bother?  It's already against the law to cut down trees on public
        property, if for no other reason than that the cutter would be trespassing.

        The City serves it's own interests very well indeed, as exemplified by the
        3% tax on property transactions.  But when it comes to the people who pay
        the taxes, we're just a cash cow.

        Stephen Kline

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jim Graham [mailto:jim@...]
        Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 8:29 AM
        To: doug.gerry@...; 'Amy Thorn'; 'Jim Graham'; 'Monroe Street
        Assoc'; 'Hugo'; 'Columbia Hts Moderated'; 'Columbia Hts'
        Cc: 'Maebry, Tremaine (COUNCIL)'
        Subject: [columbia_heights] RE: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on
        Monroe Street


        Thanks. It is  a sad event indeed. I am with this email asking Tres on
        my staff to inquire about the status of the new tree regulations, and
        report back to us. Bests Jim

        I typically answer emails before 9 AM on weekdays. If you email me after
        that, it is likely that you will hear from me the next weekday. If there
        is a need to communicate prior to that, you may wish to call me.

        Jim Graham, Councilmember, Ward One, 1350 Pa. Ave., NW, #406,
        Washington, DC 20004. 202-724-8181; 202-724-8109 (fax).


        -----Original Message-----
        From: doug.gerry@... [mailto:doug.gerry@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 12:52 PM
        To: Amy Thorn; Jim Graham; Monroe Street Assoc; Hugo; Columbia Hts
        Moderated; Columbia Hts
        Subject: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on Monroe Street


        It's a sad day on Monroe Street.  One of our neighbors has decided to
        destroy one of the oldest living trees in the neighborhood.  Although, I
        understand that this stately tree may be pushing and breaking a
        retaining wall, the retaining wall can be rebuilt but the tree cannot.
        Among one of many detrimental effects of the destruction of this tree is
        the reduction of the value our property.  Many residents on our street
        have worked very hard with the City to ensure that the new sidewalks,
        lights and paving are done properly.  We are already going to loose some
        of the trees on the block due to root damage caused by replacing lead
        water lines.  Yet, a neighbor can callously chop down a healthy tree.  I
        hope that all of us can take a minute and consider this loss and think
        about how we can work together to prevent this type of destructive
        neighborhood activity from ever happening again.  Mr. Graham, I call
        upon you to help expedite implementation of the new tree regulations.
        Thank you.
        Today, I mourn the loss of one of Monroe Street's longest living
        residents. I have included the benefits of trees, from Casey Trees web
        site, 4/7/04 http://www.caseytrees.org  Cleaner Air Quality Neighborhood
        trees sustain our city. Washington, DC 's air quality may soon fail to
        meet federally mandated standards. As a result, the District may lose
        over $115 million per year in Federal Highway Administration funds,
        which currently pay for road repairs and other transportation
        infrastructure expenses.

        Local trees protect our health. In 2002, the District reported 31 days
        of unhealthy air quality. Air pollution threatens human health, keeping
        children and teachers out of school, and increases emergency room visits
        and health care costs.

        Urban trees decrease asthma-causing pollutants. Washington, DC suffers
        from the highest asthma rate in the nation. Asthma afflicts more than 1
        in 20 of our residents, including more than 10,000 children. This rate
        greatly exceeds the national average, which is less than 1 in 50 people.
        Trees filter many harmful, health-threatening pollutants from the air.
        Cleaner Water and Less Polluted Runoff Neighborhood trees reduce
        flooding. Trees greatly reduce flooding by allowing rain to seep
        naturally into the ground. The loss of tree cover in DC from 1973 to
        1997 resulted in a 34% increase in storm water runoff and a 64%
        reduction in heavy tree cover. Since much of this runoff is collected in
        the same pipes as sewage, sewer backups and basement flooding have also
        increased.

        Local trees protect our rivers. The District's rivers fail to meet
        federal water quality standards. Polluted storm water runoff and the
        discharge of raw sewage into the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers from our
        Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) system are two major reasons for this
        failure. Less than an inch of rainfall can pour sewage into our rivers.
        Trees with mature canopies can absorb the first half-inch of rainfall,
        reducing the impact of CSOs on our rivers. And the more storm water
        infiltrates into the ground, the less pollution it sweeps into our
        rivers from parking lots and streets. Increased Economic Growth
        Neighborhood trees increase property values. Residences with healthy
        trees sell for 10-20% more than those without them.

        Street trees promote tourism and encourage local business. 700,000
        tourists visit our city each year for the annual Cherry Blossom
        Festival. Visitors and local customers spend 12% more at tree-lined
        stores than at those without trees. Reduced Crime and Anxiety Street
        trees create better neighborhoods. Research has demonstrated that
        residents living in greener communities report lower levels of fear,
        less anxiety, and lower levels of crime.

        Trees help reduce stress and violence. Green spaces and trees help
        foster a sense of community, making them particularly valuable in
        inner-city neighborhoods. Studies have shown that contact with nature
        reduces the incidence of aggression and violence, and improves
        concentration in youth. Residents living in greener surroundings report
        lower levels of fear, fewer incivilities, and less violent behavior.
        Enhanced Community Life Neighborhood trees offer rest and recreation.
        Trees create natural places to sit, stroll, nap, talk, climb, and play.

        Local trees support wildlife. Many birds, small animals, and insects
        rely on trees for food and shelter.

        City trees reflect cultural values. Throughout history, trees have been
        important elements in memorials and urban design, enabling us to share
        our heritage with new generations. Relief from Summer Heat Neighborhood
        trees save energy and money. Homes with three well-placed shade trees
        enjoy summer air conditioning costs up to 40% lower than homes without
        them.

        Local trees offer haven. Tree canopies provide refreshing shade for
        parks, streets, and parking lots.

        Street trees cool down the city. City temperatures typically average 10
        degrees higher than suburban temperatures. In 2002 in the District, more
        than half the days from June through August were above 90 degrees. In
        addition to providing shade, trees emit water vapor that cools hot air.

        Urban forests slow climate change. By lowering temperatures, urban trees
        reduce our energy consumption and decrease power plant emissions that
        contribute to global climate change. Urban trees also use photosynthesis
        to rid the atmosphere of carbon dioxide, the primary gas responsible for
        global warming. Improved Well-Being Neighborhood trees aid growth and
        health. Children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders
        (ADHD) are better able to concentrate, complete tasks, and follow
        directions after playing in natural, outdoor "green spaces." Natural
        environments improve adult health, as well: patients return home more
        quickly from hospitals where trees are visible.

        Local trees improve the view. Trees help reduce the visual impact of the
        manufactured environment and poor development. Trees add human scale to
        large buildings and projects, screen unsightly areas, and add beauty
        throughout our community.

        City trees provide peace of mind. Trees and green spaces in our
        neighborhoods help relieve the stresses of a changing world and the
        everyday pressures of crowding and noise.



        Yahoo! Groups Links









        URL to this page on the web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/columbia_heights/

        Yahoo! Groups Links







        URL to this page on the web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/columbia_heights/


      • Henock Gebreamlak
        1300 block of Newton street needs trees. Who should I contact to have trees planted in this block? Any helpwill be apreciated. Thank you, Henock
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 8, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          1300 block of Newton street needs trees. Who should I contact to have
          trees planted in this block? Any helpwill be apreciated.

          Thank you,

          Henock

          On Thu, 8 Apr 2004, Jim Graham wrote:

          > Thanks. It is a sad event indeed. I am with this email asking Tres on
          > my staff to inquire about the status of the new tree regulations, and
          > report back to us. Bests Jim
          >
          > I typically answer emails before 9 AM on weekdays. If you email me after
          > that, it is likely that you will hear from me the next weekday. If there
          > is a need to communicate prior to that, you may wish to call me.
          >
          > Jim Graham, Councilmember, Ward One, 1350 Pa. Ave., NW, #406,
          > Washington, DC 20004. 202-724-8181; 202-724-8109 (fax).
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: doug.gerry@... [mailto:doug.gerry@...]
          > Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 12:52 PM
          > To: Amy Thorn; Jim Graham; Monroe Street Assoc; Hugo; Columbia Hts
          > Moderated; Columbia Hts
          > Subject: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on Monroe Street
          >
          >
          > It's a sad day on Monroe Street. One of our neighbors has decided to
          > destroy one of the oldest living trees in the neighborhood. Although, I
          > understand that this stately tree may be pushing and breaking a
          > retaining wall, the retaining wall can be rebuilt but the tree cannot.
          > Among one of many detrimental effects of the destruction of this tree is
          > the reduction of the value our property. Many residents on our street
          > have worked very hard with the City to ensure that the new sidewalks,
          > lights and paving are done properly. We are already going to loose some
          > of the trees on the block due to root damage caused by replacing lead
          > water lines. Yet, a neighbor can callously chop down a healthy tree. I
          > hope that all of us can take a minute and consider this loss and think
          > about how we can work together to prevent this type of destructive
          > neighborhood activity from ever happening again. Mr. Graham, I call
          > upon you to help expedite implementation of the new tree regulations.
          > Thank you.
          > Today, I mourn the loss of one of Monroe Street's longest living
          > residents. I have included the benefits of trees, from Casey Trees web
          > site, 4/7/04 http://www.caseytrees.org Cleaner Air Quality Neighborhood
          > trees sustain our city. Washington, DC 's air quality may soon fail to
          > meet federally mandated standards. As a result, the District may lose
          > over $115 million per year in Federal Highway Administration funds,
          > which currently pay for road repairs and other transportation
          > infrastructure expenses.
          >
          > Local trees protect our health. In 2002, the District reported 31 days
          > of unhealthy air quality. Air pollution threatens human health, keeping
          > children and teachers out of school, and increases emergency room visits
          > and health care costs.
          >
          > Urban trees decrease asthma-causing pollutants. Washington, DC suffers
          > from the highest asthma rate in the nation. Asthma afflicts more than 1
          > in 20 of our residents, including more than 10,000 children. This rate
          > greatly exceeds the national average, which is less than 1 in 50 people.
          > Trees filter many harmful, health-threatening pollutants from the air.
          > Cleaner Water and Less Polluted Runoff Neighborhood trees reduce
          > flooding. Trees greatly reduce flooding by allowing rain to seep
          > naturally into the ground. The loss of tree cover in DC from 1973 to
          > 1997 resulted in a 34% increase in storm water runoff and a 64%
          > reduction in heavy tree cover. Since much of this runoff is collected in
          > the same pipes as sewage, sewer backups and basement flooding have also
          > increased.
          >
          > Local trees protect our rivers. The District's rivers fail to meet
          > federal water quality standards. Polluted storm water runoff and the
          > discharge of raw sewage into the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers from our
          > Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) system are two major reasons for this
          > failure. Less than an inch of rainfall can pour sewage into our rivers.
          > Trees with mature canopies can absorb the first half-inch of rainfall,
          > reducing the impact of CSOs on our rivers. And the more storm water
          > infiltrates into the ground, the less pollution it sweeps into our
          > rivers from parking lots and streets. Increased Economic Growth
          > Neighborhood trees increase property values. Residences with healthy
          > trees sell for 10-20% more than those without them.
          >
          > Street trees promote tourism and encourage local business. 700,000
          > tourists visit our city each year for the annual Cherry Blossom
          > Festival. Visitors and local customers spend 12% more at tree-lined
          > stores than at those without trees. Reduced Crime and Anxiety Street
          > trees create better neighborhoods. Research has demonstrated that
          > residents living in greener communities report lower levels of fear,
          > less anxiety, and lower levels of crime.
          >
          > Trees help reduce stress and violence. Green spaces and trees help
          > foster a sense of community, making them particularly valuable in
          > inner-city neighborhoods. Studies have shown that contact with nature
          > reduces the incidence of aggression and violence, and improves
          > concentration in youth. Residents living in greener surroundings report
          > lower levels of fear, fewer incivilities, and less violent behavior.
          > Enhanced Community Life Neighborhood trees offer rest and recreation.
          > Trees create natural places to sit, stroll, nap, talk, climb, and play.
          >
          > Local trees support wildlife. Many birds, small animals, and insects
          > rely on trees for food and shelter.
          >
          > City trees reflect cultural values. Throughout history, trees have been
          > important elements in memorials and urban design, enabling us to share
          > our heritage with new generations. Relief from Summer Heat Neighborhood
          > trees save energy and money. Homes with three well-placed shade trees
          > enjoy summer air conditioning costs up to 40% lower than homes without
          > them.
          >
          > Local trees offer haven. Tree canopies provide refreshing shade for
          > parks, streets, and parking lots.
          >
          > Street trees cool down the city. City temperatures typically average 10
          > degrees higher than suburban temperatures. In 2002 in the District, more
          > than half the days from June through August were above 90 degrees. In
          > addition to providing shade, trees emit water vapor that cools hot air.
          >
          > Urban forests slow climate change. By lowering temperatures, urban trees
          > reduce our energy consumption and decrease power plant emissions that
          > contribute to global climate change. Urban trees also use photosynthesis
          > to rid the atmosphere of carbon dioxide, the primary gas responsible for
          > global warming. Improved Well-Being Neighborhood trees aid growth and
          > health. Children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders
          > (ADHD) are better able to concentrate, complete tasks, and follow
          > directions after playing in natural, outdoor "green spaces." Natural
          > environments improve adult health, as well: patients return home more
          > quickly from hospitals where trees are visible.
          >
          > Local trees improve the view. Trees help reduce the visual impact of the
          > manufactured environment and poor development. Trees add human scale to
          > large buildings and projects, screen unsightly areas, and add beauty
          > throughout our community.
          >
          > City trees provide peace of mind. Trees and green spaces in our
          > neighborhoods help relieve the stresses of a changing world and the
          > everyday pressures of crowding and noise.
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > URL to this page on the web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/columbia_heights/
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Brain McLaughlin
          I do not believe the city should be regulating what someone does on their property regarding a tree. This will only lead to further regulation upon what
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 9, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            I do not believe the city should be regulating what someone does on their property regarding a tree.  This will only lead to further regulation upon what people can do with their homes, if first trees what next, is the city going to tell me what color I can paint my house?.  A wall can be rebuilt and a tree can be replanted.  However, if a tree is breaching someone's home then it is their right and responsibility to ensure their own safety.  To make a blanket statement about a wall gives no consideration to the cost of rebuilding or the additional damage to property you cannot see.
             
            Columbia Heights and the District have needs that must be addressed.  Security and water quality in particular.  In my opinion for all the lip service these issues get there have not been improvements to match.  I don't think its too bad that tree regulations are set aside, while our officials SOLVE security and water quailty problems we face.  If they cannot solve these problems, it is the citizens duty to respond accordingly.  We should not accept press releases as adequate action.   We need results!
             
            I am in now way an opponent of clean air or health.  Instead of regulating trees on residents private property, the city should require Tivoli, Target and other development projects to use more environmentally friendly energy (solar, etc).  Require housing developments who reap huge tax windfalls to plant a tree for every 100 square feet of development, for example.  These efforts will do much more to protect the beauty of our city and neighborhood.
             
            Have a great day.

            Stephen Kline <shkline@...> wrote:
            As I found out several weeks ago, the tree regulations are waiting approval
            by Corporation Counsel.  If the past is prologue to the future, we can
            expect these regulations sometime in 2020 or therebouts.  My neighbor
            recently cut down 5 legacy black walnut trees, each more than 24 inches in
            diameter.  These trees were probably 125 to 150 years old.  Black walnuts
            are very slow growing.  Over the course of several days, the trees
            disappeared one by one.

            Comments I had from Jim Graham's office were that even if the regulations
            would have been written, it did not appear that they applied to private
            property anyway.  My question is if they don't apply to private property,
            why bother?  It's already against the law to cut down trees on public
            property, if for no other reason than that the cutter would be trespassing.

            The City serves it's own interests very well indeed, as exemplified by the
            3% tax on property transactions.  But when it comes to the people who pay
            the taxes, we're just a cash cow.

            Stephen Kline

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Jim Graham [mailto:jim@...]
            Sent: Thursday, April 08, 2004 8:29 AM
            To: doug.gerry@...; 'Amy Thorn'; 'Jim Graham'; 'Monroe Street
            Assoc'; 'Hugo'; 'Columbia Hts Moderated'; 'Columbia Hts'
            Cc: 'Maebry, Tremaine (COUNCIL)'
            Subject: [columbia_heights] RE: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on
            Monroe Street


            Thanks. It is  a sad event indeed. I am with this email asking Tres on
            my staff to inquire about the status of the new tree regulations, and
            report back to us. Bests Jim

            I typically answer emails before 9 AM on weekdays. If you email me after
            that, it is likely that you will hear from me the next weekday. If there
            is a need to communicate prior to that, you may wish to call me.

            Jim Graham, Councilmember, Ward One, 1350 Pa. Ave., NW, #406,
            Washington, DC 20004. 202-724-8181; 202-724-8109 (fax).


            -----Original Message-----
            From: doug.gerry@... [mailto:doug.gerry@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, April 07, 2004 12:52 PM
            To: Amy Thorn; Jim Graham; Monroe Street Assoc; Hugo; Columbia Hts
            Moderated; Columbia Hts
            Subject: [SPAM] [MonroeStreetAssoc] A sad day on Monroe Street


            It's a sad day on Monroe Street.  One of our neighbors has decided to
            destroy one of the oldest living trees in the neighborhood.  Although, I
            understand that this stately tree may be pushing and breaking a
            retaining wall, the retaining wall can be rebuilt but the tree cannot.
            Among one of many detrimental effects of the destruction of this tree is
            the reduction of the value our property.  Many residents on our street
            have worked very hard with the City to ensure that the new sidewalks,
            lights and paving are done properly.  We are already going to loose some
            of the trees on the block due to root damage caused by replacing lead
            water lines.  Yet, a neighbor can callously chop down a healthy tree.  I
            hope that all of us can take a minute and consider this loss and think
            about how we can work together to prevent this type of destructive
            neighborhood activity from ever happening again.  Mr. Graham, I call
            upon you to help expedite implementation of the new tree regulations.
            Thank you.
            Today, I mourn the loss of one of Monroe Street's longest living
            residents. I have included the benefits of trees, from Casey Trees web
            site, 4/7/04 http://www.caseytrees.org  Cleaner Air Quality Neighborhood
            trees sustain our city. Washington, DC 's air quality may soon fail to
            meet federally mandated standards. As a result, the District may lose
            over $115 million per year in Federal Highway Administration funds,
            which currently pay for road repairs and other transportation
            infrastructure expenses.

            Local trees protect our health. In 2002, the District reported 31 days
            of unhealthy air quality. Air pollution threatens human health, keeping
            children and teachers out of school, and increases emergency room visits
            and health care costs.

            Urban trees decrease asthma-causing pollutants. Washington, DC suffers
            from the highest asthma rate in the nation. Asthma afflicts more than 1
            in 20 of our residents, including more than 10,000 children. This rate
            greatly exceeds the national average, which is less than 1 in 50 people.
            Trees filter many harmful, health-threatening pollutants from the air.
            Cleaner Water and Less Polluted Runoff Neighborhood trees reduce
            flooding. Trees greatly reduce flooding by allowing rain to seep
            naturally into the ground. The loss of tree cover in DC from 1973 to
            1997 resulted in a 34% increase in storm water runoff and a 64%
            reduction in heavy tree cover. Since much of this runoff is collected in
            the same pipes as sewage, sewer backups and basement flooding have also
            increased.

            Local trees protect our rivers. The District's rivers fail to meet
            federal water quality standards. Polluted storm water runoff and the
            discharge of raw sewage into the Anacostia and Potomac Rivers from our
            Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) system are two major reasons for this
            failure. Less than an inch of rainfall can pour sewage into our rivers.
            Trees with mature canopies can absorb the first half-inch of rainfall,
            reducing the impact of CSOs on our rivers. And the more storm water
            infiltrates into the ground, the less pollution it sweeps into our
            rivers from parking lots and streets. Increased Economic Growth
            Neighborhood trees increase property values. Residences with healthy
            trees sell for 10-20% more than those without them.

            Street trees promote tourism and encourage local business. 700,000
            tourists visit our city each year for the annual Cherry Blossom
            Festival. Visitors and local customers spend 12% more at tree-lined
            stores than at those without trees. Reduced Crime and Anxiety Street
            trees create better neighborhoods. Research has demonstrated that
            residents living in greener communities report lower levels of fear,
            less anxiety, and lower levels of crime.

            Trees help reduce stress and violence. Green spaces and trees help
            foster a sense of community, making them particularly valuable in
            inner-city neighborhoods. Studies have shown that contact with nature
            reduces the incidence of aggression and violence, and improves
            concentration in youth. Residents living in greener surroundings report
            lower levels of fear, fewer incivilities, and less violent behavior.
            Enhanced Community Life Neighborhood trees offer rest and recreation.
            Trees create natural places to sit, stroll, nap, talk, climb, and play.

            Local trees support wildlife. Many birds, small animals, and insects
            rely on trees for food and shelter.

            City trees reflect cultural values. Throughout history, trees have been
            important elements in memorials and urban design, enabling us to share
            our heritage with new generations. Relief from Summer Heat Neighborhood
            trees save energy and money. Homes with three well-placed shade trees
            enjoy summer air conditioning costs up to 40% lower than homes without
            them.

            Local trees offer haven. Tree canopies provide refreshing shade for
            parks, streets, and parking lots.

            Street trees cool down the city. City temperatures typically average 10
            degrees higher than suburban temperatures. In 2002 in the District, more
            than half the days from June through August were above 90 degrees. In
            addition to providing shade, trees emit water vapor that cools hot air.

            Urban forests slow climate change. By lowering temperatures, urban trees
            reduce our energy consumption and decrease power plant emissions that
            contribute to global climate change. Urban trees also use photosynthesis
            to rid the atmosphere of carbon dioxide, the primary gas responsible for
            global warming. Improved Well-Being Neighborhood trees aid growth and
            health. Children with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders
            (ADHD) are better able to concentrate, complete tasks, and follow
            directions after playing in natural, outdoor "green spaces." Natural
            environments improve adult health, as well: patients return home more
            quickly from hospitals where trees are visible.

            Local trees improve the view. Trees help reduce the visual impact of the
            manufactured environment and poor development. Trees add human scale to
            large buildings and projects, screen unsightly areas, and add beauty
            throughout our community.

            City trees provide peace of mind. Trees and green spaces in our
            neighborhoods help relieve the stresses of a changing world and the
            everyday pressures of crowding and noise.



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          • lwannemach@aol.com
            Thank you, Jim. I would think that having your name on a District-wide initiative of this sort would be wonderful! And/or for Columbia Heights to set a
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 9, 2004
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              Thank you, Jim.  I would think that having your name on a District-wide initiative of this sort would be wonderful!  And/or for Columbia Heights to set a fantastic example that would attract many to the CH neighborhood.  larry   
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