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Schwitters story on BBC

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  • jeff kallet
    Saw a link to a Schwitters story on BBC radio: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0194kl0 The lead-in reads: It took a long time for the British artworld to
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 9, 2012
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      Saw a link to a Schwitters story on BBC radio: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0194kl0

      The lead-in reads:
      It took a long time for the British artworld to recognise the
      influence of Kurt Schwitters, a German artist who died in Cumbria just
      after the end of World War Two. But in 2011, the Lake District barn he
      worked in during his last days was rebuilt stone for stone in the West
      End of London, and in 2013 a major retrospective of Schwitters' work
      will open at Tate Britain. In this programme, Bob Dickinson explains why Schwitters has become so highly regarded, and traces Schwitters'
      journey from Hannover to Cumbria, where he visits the original barn in
      Elterwater where Schwitters' final, most ambitious work began to be
      constructed - and Newcastle on Tyne, where that sculpture, built on to
      one complete wall of the barn, was transported during the 1960s.
      Kurt Schwitters was one of the great European modern artists - a
      founder of the Dada movement in Germany, and an inventor of the
      technique we now call collage - piecing artworks together from fragments of found images, print, text, or discarded objects which even included
      rubbish. Eventually he developed a style he called Merz, and started
      making elaborate sculptures you could walk inside, called Merzbau - the
      forerunners of today's installation art. But the rise of the Nazis
      forced Schwitters to flee, leaving his wife and family in Hannover, and
      moving to Norway and then Britain.

      Jeff Kallet


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