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Re: [collage museum] Wee Three Thing

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  • Lava of the desert
    A happy and healthy New Year to you and your loved ones.   Robert roberttuckerart.com ... From: Jed Subject: [collage museum] Wee Three
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 31, 2009
      A happy and healthy New Year to you and your loved ones.
       
      Robert
      roberttuckerart.com

      --- On Tue, 12/29/09, Jed <gregcat@...> wrote:


      From: Jed <gregcat@...>
      Subject: [collage museum] Wee Three Thing
      To: collage@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, December 29, 2009, 2:40 PM


       



      Hi, group. I took a few collage workshops from Jonathan Talbot a few years back, and he teaches the use of acrylic gloss medium, which I find sticky and kind of icky to work with. Seems to me that he may have diluted the medium when we used it in class, or used something similar that was more liquid. I tend to use fairly small pieces in my compositions, and then of course when they're coated with medium, they curl up if they are flimsier paper, then they want to stick to themselves or each other or whatever I'm working on top of. Any suggestions? As far as adhesives?

      Also, I bought a new Epson Photosmart printer recently and really don't care for it--it's slow, noisy, and it doesn't really copy true to the colors of the original piece I may be copying, scanning or printing from the web. I think I want to go to a (much more expensive) laser printer, but I don't know if laser will allow me to do some of the transfer techniques I've learned. I should do some online research, most of the guys at Office Max or wherever don't really understand about art.

      Finally, I mostly work from found papers, but there are times when I'd like to do some photoshop-type manipulation, such as layering images--I suppose I could do this more mechanically by printing some things onto transparencies, but do people on the list use photoshop Elements or something similar, and does it work well for you?

      Phew.

      Thanks, and happy new year to all.

      Chad











      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kathryn Sorci
      Hi Jed, I ve worked with found papers for years and also took the Jonathan Talbot class in 99 when he was here in AZ. I don t think he added water to thin
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 31, 2009
        Hi Jed,
        I've worked with found papers for years and also took the Jonathan
        Talbot class in '99 when he was here in AZ. I don't think he added
        water to thin down the Golden acrylic that he was using. Just use
        less. I had been using Liquitex medium, and had found it much easier
        to clean up, but I think they changed their formula. I still use
        both. As for the curling and rippling of the papers, I liked his
        method and had never used Jonathan's (coating the papers first and
        letting them dry.) I always felt it wasted too much medium because as
        you tear or cut, you wind up throwing small pieces away. Instead, I
        coat the back of the paper and apply it to illustration or watercolor
        board, then use a damp paper towel and a brayer to flatten nicely,
        and I have never had a problem. With canvas it's a little harder. You
        need a board in back of it under the canvas to press well. I would
        say, just use quality papers. Some are way too thin and fall apart or
        just don't apply well. Cheap magazines are the worst I find as the
        ink is poor and the paper is thin. I also coat the top of the
        collages when completed.

        I can't tell you much about laser printers. I use a regular HP poster
        size. The problem though is calibrating the color on the screen to
        the printer you have (which has been a real pain for me). The print
        you see is NOT always the print you get. So what I do is take a
        portion of the pic I want to print, 'select' with the selection tools
        it in Photoshop and print that portion out so as not to waste al lot
        of ink on an entire pic. I try to get my darkest and lightest areas.
        Then I print it and compare to the original. If it's too light or too
        dark, I go back into Photoshop and adjust the 'curves' or adjust
        selected areas with the 'color balance'. I have had good luck with
        this. I also print pics on anything that will run through the printer-
        BUT- being water-based inks, you must let it dry for as much as 30
        minutes and then spray it with clear coat Krylon or something like it
        before adhering.

        As for layering, if I remember, Elements has layers, so does
        Photoshop. Just go to 'view layers' and click on the layer you want
        to adjust. You can also use the selection tool and outline a specific
        area to enhance. Use 'opacity' to get a 'see through foggy effect.
        Use the 'f' to create embossing or drop shadows, etc. I would say
        that I taught myself Photoshop years ago on 4.0, and it did just fine
        for me. But always make new layers for everything you create for a
        pic, or you'll always be working on the background layer, and if you
        make a boo boo, you'll have to delete all of it and start over- a
        real, real pain. CS2 will step back for you only 10 times, so if you
        made ten erasures, say, on the layer and want to go back one more
        step, you're out of luck. It's much easier to delete a layer then to
        start over when you've done 30+ things. Layers always! You can
        flatten your work under the 'layers' tool when you are happy with it.
        Don't be afraid to 'play'. I ALWAYS save a PSD in layers and as a a
        flattened PSD or JPG at 300 dpi, in case I need it down the road for
        a card, or print, and THEN get it off the computer to a flash drive
        or CD so as not to bog down my program. Believe me, you'll be glad
        you did, because it really slows down your computer and creates havoc
        in Photoshop down the road- usually when something important you need
        has to be done. People become garbage heads downloading crap all the
        time, and 'free' doesn't always mean free. Viruses and chaos can
        occur from them when you least expect it. A word to the wise...
        Probably more than anyone wanted to know, but if it helps someone
        else, Happy New Year!
        Kate



        Kathryn Uster Profera http://www.acomawestcollage.com/


        On Dec 29, 2009, at 12:40 PM, Jed wrote:

        > Hi, group. I took a few collage workshops from Jonathan Talbot a
        > few years back, and he teaches the use of acrylic gloss medium,
        > which I find sticky and kind of icky to work with. Seems to me that
        > he may have diluted the medium when we used it in class, or used
        > something similar that was more liquid. I tend to use fairly small
        > pieces in my compositions, and then of course when they're coated
        > with medium, they curl up if they are flimsier paper, then they
        > want to stick to themselves or each other or whatever I'm working
        > on top of. Any suggestions? As far as adhesives?
        >
        > Also, I bought a new Epson Photosmart printer recently and really
        > don't care for it--it's slow, noisy, and it doesn't really copy
        > true to the colors of the original piece I may be copying, scanning
        > or printing from the web. I think I want to go to a (much more
        > expensive) laser printer, but I don't know if laser will allow me
        > to do some of the transfer techniques I've learned. I should do
        > some online research, most of the guys at Office Max or wherever
        > don't really understand about art.
        >
        > Finally, I mostly work from found papers, but there are times when
        > I'd like to do some photoshop-type manipulation, such as layering
        > images--I suppose I could do this more mechanically by printing
        > some things onto transparencies, but do people on the list use
        > photoshop Elements or something similar, and does it work well for
        > you?
        >
        > Phew.
        >
        > Thanks, and happy new year to all.
        >
        > Chad
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • sharonnickodem@aol.com
        Hi Chad....I am a photographer. Epson really does make about the best printers around for photo realisitic images, though I am not familiar with the
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 31, 2009
          Hi Chad....I am a photographer. Epson really does make about the best printers around for "photo realisitic" images, though I am not familiar with the Photosmart printer. I have a color laserjet by HP (model CM1017 MFP), but it does not work for transfers like the lazer printers at a copy store, because the toner does not have enough carbon in it, plus the print has circle around (literally) 4 toner cartridges. But, the laser does good prints and copies, and is cheaper (long haul) than an ink jet printer. I really recommend you go to a high end photography store (where they sell cameras, printers, etc.) and talk to the digital printer sales persons about what you're trying to do. I think they can give you the best advise, and you can see the results from the printers in stock. Most good stores will even let you bring in an image you want to print, and they will do a test run for you. Good luck! Sharon


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jed <gregcat@...>
          To: collage@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, Dec 29, 2009 11:40 am
          Subject: [collage museum] Wee Three Thing




          Hi, group. I took a few collage workshops from Jonathan Talbot a few years back, and he teaches the use of acrylic gloss medium, which I find sticky and kind of icky to work with. Seems to me that he may have diluted the medium when we used it in class, or used something similar that was more liquid. I tend to use fairly small pieces in my compositions, and then of course when they're coated with medium, they curl up if they are flimsier paper, then they want to stick to themselves or each other or whatever I'm working on top of. Any suggestions? As far as adhesives?

          Also, I bought a new Epson Photosmart printer recently and really don't care for it--it's slow, noisy, and it doesn't really copy true to the colors of the original piece I may be copying, scanning or printing from the web. I think I want to go to a (much more expensive) laser printer, but I don't know if laser will allow me to do some of the transfer techniques I've learned. I should do some online research, most of the guys at Office Max or wherever don't really understand about art.

          Finally, I mostly work from found papers, but there are times when I'd like to do some photoshop-type manipulation, such as layering images--I suppose I could do this more mechanically by printing some things onto transparencies, but do people on the list use photoshop Elements or something similar, and does it work well for you?

          Phew.

          Thanks, and happy new year to all.

          Chad







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Janine Nichols
          you need laserjet copies for the best transfers. try clear contact paper for transparent transfers. I also just ordered a heat transfer tool. Ihear you can use
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 31, 2009
            you need laserjet copies for the best transfers. try clear contact paper for
            transparent transfers. I also just ordered a heat transfer tool. Ihear you
            can use it to transfer laser copies onto museum board (maybe paper would
            catch fire) and GLASS.

            have fun. keep me posted. you can see my layered transfers at the url
            below.....
            J a n i n e



            www.flutterbox.net
            www.janinenicholssings.blogspot.com
            www.jazzpaperscissors.blogspot.com
            http://collagesociety.ning.com/profile/JanineNichols?xg_source=profiles_memberList


            On Tue, Dec 29, 2009 at 2:40 PM, Jed <gregcat@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > Hi, group. I took a few collage workshops from Jonathan Talbot a few years
            > back, and he teaches the use of acrylic gloss medium, which I find sticky
            > and kind of icky to work with. Seems to me that he may have diluted the
            > medium when we used it in class, or used something similar that was more
            > liquid. I tend to use fairly small pieces in my compositions, and then of
            > course when they're coated with medium, they curl up if they are flimsier
            > paper, then they want to stick to themselves or each other or whatever I'm
            > working on top of. Any suggestions? As far as adhesives?
            >
            > Also, I bought a new Epson Photosmart printer recently and really don't
            > care for it--it's slow, noisy, and it doesn't really copy true to the colors
            > of the original piece I may be copying, scanning or printing from the web. I
            > think I want to go to a (much more expensive) laser printer, but I don't
            > know if laser will allow me to do some of the transfer techniques I've
            > learned. I should do some online research, most of the guys at Office Max or
            > wherever don't really understand about art.
            >
            > Finally, I mostly work from found papers, but there are times when I'd like
            > to do some photoshop-type manipulation, such as layering images--I suppose I
            > could do this more mechanically by printing some things onto transparencies,
            > but do people on the list use photoshop Elements or something similar, and
            > does it work well for you?
            >
            > Phew.
            >
            > Thanks, and happy new year to all.
            >
            > Chad
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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