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exhibition

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  • peter6836
    Hello everyone I am a rather new member of this goup. I have been working on a series of pieces. What I would like to know is how to I exhibit my work? How
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 3, 2008
      Hello everyone I am a rather new member of this goup. I have been
      working on a series of pieces. What I would like to know is how to I
      exhibit my work? How many pieces do I need for an exhibit? Do they
      need to be framed? I am not sure how to go about displaying my work
      and having it viewed by people. Any suggestions will help. I will
      attempt to put some photos of my work on this site also to get some
      feedback as to if my pieces are worthy of exhibition.
      thanks\
      Peter
    • Valbi
      Hello Peter, welcome. The first question I can not respond because it is too difficult and my English is not adequate and also because it is a question by one
      Message 2 of 20 , Sep 8, 2008
        Hello Peter, welcome.
        The first question I can not respond because it is too difficult and my English is not adequate and also because it is a question by one million dollars.
        The second is easy.
        If you go here: http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/collage/photos
        and open a new folder with your name, you can upload reproductions of your work.
        For example is this mine:
        http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/collage/photos/browse/8661
         
        Best regard
        Valentino 


        --- Mer 3/9/08, peter6836 <peter6836@...> ha scritto:

        Da: peter6836 <peter6836@...>
        Oggetto: [collage museum] exhibition
        A: collage@yahoogroups.com
        Data: Mercoledì 3 settembre 2008, 17:48






        Hello everyone I am a rather new member of this goup. I have been
        working on a series of pieces. What I would like to know is how to I
        exhibit my work? How many pieces do I need for an exhibit? Do they
        need to be framed? I am not sure how to go about displaying my work
        and having it viewed by people. Any suggestions will help. I will
        attempt to put some photos of my work on this site also to get some
        feedback as to if my pieces are worthy of exhibition.
        thanks\
        Peter















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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • cecil touchon
        Depending on size, a good exhibition is anywhere from 15 to 30 works unless you are Matthew Rose in which case at least 1,000. It is best to frame works on
        Message 3 of 20 , Sep 9, 2008
          Depending on size, a good exhibition is anywhere from 15 to 30 works
          unless you are Matthew Rose in which case at least 1,000. It is best
          to frame works on paper but there are other ways that are less costly
          but temporary. One is to have some sheets of glass of plexiglass cut
          to sie and then hold the works to the wall with the glass using those
          little 'L' fasteners that you nail into the wall and it holds up the
          work and keeps it snugly against the wall. Another option is to work
          on supports that can be hund on the wall without frames such as canvas
          or wood panels with supports.

          Works are often hung with the center of the work being 61 inches from
          the floor. Works should be spaced based on the available wall space
          and far enough apart that people looking at works next to each other
          don't interfere with each other's personal space.

          As far as exhibiting is concerned you can always send things to the
          collage museum http://collagemuseum.com

          Also, we have the next Baker's Dozen exchange coming up. see:
          http://collagemuseum.com/collage-exchange-index.html

          Welcome to the group!
          Cecil Touchon, List Owner




          --- In collage@yahoogroups.com, "peter6836" <peter6836@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello everyone I am a rather new member of this goup. I have been
          > working on a series of pieces. What I would like to know is how to I
          > exhibit my work? How many pieces do I need for an exhibit? Do they
          > need to be framed? I am not sure how to go about displaying my work
          > and having it viewed by people. Any suggestions will help. I will
          > attempt to put some photos of my work on this site also to get some
          > feedback as to if my pieces are worthy of exhibition.
          > thanks\
          > Peter
          >
        • MATTHEW ROSE
          Depending on size, a good exhibition is anywhere from 15 to 30 works unless you are Matthew Rose in which case at least 1,000. Ha ha ha... Totally agree on
          Message 4 of 20 , Sep 9, 2008
            "Depending on size, a good exhibition is anywhere from 15 to 30 works unless you are Matthew Rose in which case at least 1,000."

            Ha ha ha...

            Totally agree on the L hooks w/glass. They are inexpensive, clean and actually magnify the work. Get 1/8 - 1/4 inch glass.

            See you in Atlanta....maybe...for The End of the World (only 100 pieces here!)

            COLLAGE BY MATTHEW ROSE: http://homepage.mac.com/mistahcoughdrop/ LALANDE DIGITAL ART PRESS: http://lalandedigitalpress.blogspot.com/ ART & MUSIC VIDEOS: http://www.youtube.com/user/mistahcoughdrop
          • cecil touchon
            I am still hoping to get to atlanta for your show and drop off some works of my own to my gallery out there. Just depends on my wife who is in Cuernavaca
            Message 5 of 20 , Sep 9, 2008
              I am still hoping to get to atlanta for your show and drop off some
              works of my own to my gallery out there. Just depends on my wife who
              is in Cuernavaca recovering from a surgery. She is trying to get back
              this weekend so that I can go but just depends if she's feeling
              recovered enough.
              If not in Atlanta, I'll come over and see you in Paris!
              Cecil

              --- In collage@yahoogroups.com, MATTHEW ROSE <mistahrose@...> wrote:

              >
              > See you in Atlanta....maybe...for The End of the World (only 100
              pieces here!)
            • Eric Jose Pancho
              Hi Guys! Just got some questions too about exhibition or probably something related to it. When I go to galleries, I sometimes see markings on the lower left
              Message 6 of 20 , Sep 12, 2008
                Hi Guys!

                Just got some questions too about exhibition or probably something related to it.

                When I go to galleries, I sometimes see markings on the lower left hand of collage and prints: A/P, 1/20, etc. I know A/P is Artist Proof and this is not the original collage or print but a 'reproduction.' And the 1/20 is a print number of the print series.

                Just want to know what is the difference between the 2. And are A/Ps saleable too and how does it effect the price compared to the original art work? And if for example I come out with a 1st series (1-20/20) in one exhibit and sold all of the reproductions, can I have another series of the same art work in a future exhibit or would 20 be it for the rest of my life?

                Thank you all!

                Eric
              • Jacqueline Sullivan
                You would need to change something with the second edition - doing it in a different size or something. Jacqueline Sullivan Now available - my DVD, Acrylics,
                Message 7 of 20 , Sep 12, 2008
                  You would need to change something with the second edition - doing it
                  in a different size or something.

                  Jacqueline Sullivan

                  Now available - my DVD, Acrylics, Textures, Layers and Metallics from
                  CCPVideos.com

                  http://blog.jacquelinesullivan.com
                  ww.jacquelinesullivan.com

                  On Sep 12, 2008, at 6:03 AM, Eric Jose Pancho wrote:

                  > Hi Guys!
                  >
                  > Just got some questions too about exhibition or probably something
                  > related to it.
                  >
                  > When I go to galleries, I sometimes see markings on the lower left
                  > hand of collage and prints: A/P, 1/20, etc. I know A/P is Artist
                  > Proof and this is not the original collage or print but a
                  > 'reproduction.' And the 1/20 is a print number of the print series.
                  >
                  > Just want to know what is the difference between the 2. And are A/Ps
                  > saleable too and how does it effect the price compared to the original
                  > art work? And if for example I come out with a 1st series (1-20/20)
                  > in one exhibit and sold all of the reproductions, can I have another
                  > series of the same art work in a future exhibit or would 20 be it for
                  > the rest of my life?
                  >
                  > Thank you all!
                  >
                  > Eric
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
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                  > BAKER'S DOZEN INTERNATIONAL COLLAGE EXCHANGE DEADLINE March 21 and
                  > October 21
                  > http://collagemuseum.com/collage-exchange-index.html
                  > send your mailing address to info@... for a free
                  > reminder postcard.
                  >
                  > -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Janet Jones
                  Glad you asked, Eric. There are strict rules regarding the numbering and editioning of prints. A/P means Artist s Proof. Artist s Proofs are 10% of the
                  Message 8 of 20 , Sep 12, 2008
                    Glad you asked, Eric.

                    There are strict rules regarding the numbering and editioning of prints.

                    A/P means Artist's Proof. Artist's Proofs are 10% of the edition in addition to the number printed in the edition. So if the edition size is 20, the printmaker will make 22 identical prints, two of which are designated Artist's Proofs. They are all of the same value.

                    If you have an edition of 20 prints (plus 2 A/P) you may not print additional prints when the edition sells out. What you can do is make a significant alteration to the plate(s) and designate another edition State 2 (or State II). These should be numbered as an edition. If you have an image that you think will be a popular favorite, you can decide at the outset to designate it as an open edition, unnumbered. You can't decide after you've printed an edition to declare it an open edition and keep going.

                    No print in an edition is more valuable than another in the same edition, but often photographers and printmakers will sell a portion of the edition at an introductory price, and then raise the price incrementally as the prints become more scarce. For example, if there are 40 prints in the edition, the first 10 would sell at one price, the next ten at a higher price, and so on. This is perfectly legitimate, and offers the collector an incentive to buy early. It also underlscores the importance of declaring the edition size and playing by the rules.

                    Reproductions of original works of art, usually paintings, are often printed by offset lithography and numbered, signed and sold as limited edition prints. These are reproductions, not original prints. The same is true of "giclees" and digital copies of original works. The exception is digital collage and other computer-generated imagery, which only exists as a digital print and is not a copy of work created in another medium.

                    Sorry to shout, but this is important, and I feel strongly about it.

                    Janet



                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Eric Jose Pancho
                    To: collage@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 3:03 AM
                    Subject: [collage museum] Re: exhibition


                    Hi Guys!

                    Just got some questions too about exhibition or probably something related to it.

                    When I go to galleries, I sometimes see markings on the lower left hand of collage and prints: A/P, 1/20, etc. I know A/P is Artist Proof and this is not the original collage or print but a 'reproduction.' And the 1/20 is a print number of the print series.

                    Just want to know what is the difference between the 2. And are A/Ps saleable too and how does it effect the price compared to the original art work? And if for example I come out with a 1st series (1-20/20) in one exhibit and sold all of the reproductions, can I have another series of the same art work in a future exhibit or would 20 be it for the rest of my life?

                    Thank you all!

                    Eric





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Dale Copeland
                    Hi Eric, I believe AP, Artist Proof, isn t a reproduction but one of the first runs of a print, where the artist was still making adjustments. Then the print
                    Message 9 of 20 , Sep 12, 2008
                      Hi Eric, I believe AP, Artist Proof, isn't a reproduction but one of the
                      first runs of a print, where the artist was still making adjustments.
                      Then the print run starts. And once it's finished, it's finished. You
                      can have photographic reproductions made but they're not part of the
                      print run.
                      Cheers
                      dale

                      Eric Jose Pancho wrote:

                      >Hi Guys!
                      >
                      >Just got some questions too about exhibition or probably something related to it.
                      >
                      >When I go to galleries, I sometimes see markings on the lower left hand of collage and prints: A/P, 1/20, etc. I know A/P is Artist Proof and this is not the original collage or print but a 'reproduction.' And the 1/20 is a print number of the print series.
                      >
                      >Just want to know what is the difference between the 2. And are A/Ps saleable too and how does it effect the price compared to the original art work? And if for example I come out with a 1st series (1-20/20) in one exhibit and sold all of the reproductions, can I have another series of the same art work in a future exhibit or would 20 be it for the rest of my life?
                      >
                      >Thank you all!
                      >
                      >Eric
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      --
                      Dale Copeland
                      own site http://dalecopeland.co.nz
                      Virtual TART http://virtual.tart.co.nz
                      Collage & assemblage sites http://outofsight.co.nz
                    • Janet Jones
                      A bit more clarification: A/P is not a trial print, but exactly the same as the edition prints. A trial or test print would be designated T/P. S/P, for
                      Message 10 of 20 , Sep 12, 2008
                        A bit more clarification: A/P is not a trial print, but exactly the same as the edition prints. A trial or test print would be designated T/P. S/P, for State Proof, is sometimes also used to mean the same thing.

                        Janet


                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Dale Copeland
                        To: collage@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 12:31 PM
                        Subject: Re: [collage museum] Re: exhibition


                        Hi Eric, I believe AP, Artist Proof, isn't a reproduction but one of the
                        first runs of a print, where the artist was still making adjustments.
                        Then the print run starts. And once it's finished, it's finished. You
                        can have photographic reproductions made but they're not part of the
                        print run.
                        Cheers
                        dale

                        Eric Jose Pancho wrote:

                        >Hi Guys!
                        >
                        >Just got some questions too about exhibition or probably something related to it.
                        >
                        >When I go to galleries, I sometimes see markings on the lower left hand of collage and prints: A/P, 1/20, etc. I know A/P is Artist Proof and this is not the original collage or print but a 'reproduction.' And the 1/20 is a print number of the print series.
                        >
                        >Just want to know what is the difference between the 2. And are A/Ps saleable too and how does it effect the price compared to the original art work? And if for example I come out with a 1st series (1-20/20) in one exhibit and sold all of the reproductions, can I have another series of the same art work in a future exhibit or would 20 be it for the rest of my life?
                        >
                        >Thank you all!
                        >
                        >Eric
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        --
                        Dale Copeland
                        own site http://dalecopeland.co.nz
                        Virtual TART http://virtual.tart.co.nz
                        Collage & assemblage sites http://outofsight.co.nz





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Karalee Krueger
                        As I understand it, A/P is a bonus for the artist because, while in theory it is true that all have the same value, in practice they do not. For some reason,
                        Message 11 of 20 , Sep 13, 2008
                          As I understand it, A/P is a bonus for the artist because, while in theory
                          it is true that all have the same value, in practice they do not. For some
                          reason, collectors of such things tend to place value on the numbers as
                          though they were book editions, therefore the lower the number within a
                          limited release, the more value they place upon it. An A/P "edition" is
                          most valuable because of the increased possibility that the artist has put
                          more of his DNA upon it. Sort of like finding a first edition book where
                          the author not only signed the fly page, but also made notes in the margins.
                          Remember, we are talking about collectors here. So, the artist hangs on to
                          the A/P versions and sells them later, at a premium. They might even
                          enhance the value by writing something on the back. I joke about the DNA,
                          but of value is the knowledge that the numbering was done, by hand, by the
                          artist himself. I probably have some detail wrong, but I think I have the
                          general gist of it right.



                          Karalee





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Janet Jones
                          I m sure this will be more than you (or anyone on the list) will want to know, but I ve been a printmaker since 1980, and so are most of my friends. The print
                          Message 12 of 20 , Sep 14, 2008
                            I'm sure this will be more than you (or anyone on the list) will want to know, but I've been a printmaker since 1980, and so are most of my friends. The print I would want to have, as a collector, in terms of a personal connection with the artist, would be the B.A.T. if one ever came up for sale. B.A.T. stands for "bon a tirer", literally "good to pull (through the press)". When a printer other than the artist printmaker prints the edition, this is the standard that the edition must match. The artist marks it B.A.T., signs and dates it, and usually writes instructions for printing in the margins. I've never seen artist's notations on an artist proof, but quite often on trial proofs.

                            As to the order in which prints are numbered, I quote Clare Romano and John Ross from their book, "The Complete Printmaker": "If the edition consists of 100 prints that are all printed at the same time, it is almost impossible for the numbering to reflect which one was number two, and so on. Because the prints are normally dried under blotters or newsprint, the stacks are shuffled many times before they are signed and numbered."

                            It's time for me to get back to work!

                            Janet

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: Karalee Krueger
                            To: collage@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Saturday, September 13, 2008 3:49 PM
                            Subject: [collage museum] Re: exhibition


                            As I understand it, A/P is a bonus for the artist because, while in theory
                            it is true that all have the same value, in practice they do not. For some
                            reason, collectors of such things tend to place value on the numbers as
                            though they were book editions, therefore the lower the number within a
                            limited release, the more value they place upon it. An A/P "edition" is
                            most valuable because of the increased possibility that the artist has put
                            more of his DNA upon it. Sort of like finding a first edition book where
                            the author not only signed the fly page, but also made notes in the margins.
                            Remember, we are talking about collectors here. So, the artist hangs on to
                            the A/P versions and sells them later, at a premium. They might even
                            enhance the value by writing something on the back. I joke about the DNA,
                            but of value is the knowledge that the numbering was done, by hand, by the
                            artist himself. I probably have some detail wrong, but I think I have the
                            general gist of it right.

                            Karalee

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Karalee Krueger
                            Good to know! Thanks. I ve never ventured into the world of printmaking. Actually quite fascinating. The more I think about it, the more I remember my
                            Message 13 of 20 , Sep 16, 2008
                              Good to know! Thanks. I've never ventured into the world of printmaking.
                              Actually quite fascinating.



                              The more I think about it, the more I remember my "authority" about
                              numbering was from a gallery owner trying to sell me a print, and the print
                              had been hand numbered and signed by the artist. There might have been a
                              wee bit stretching of the truth in what I was told about what collectors
                              valued. J One must always consider the source and bring out the salt!



                              Karalee





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Eric Jose Pancho
                              Hi Guys! I cannot thank you enough for the information. Everything is cleared up now with the A/P and edition numbers. Just got one more question, what is the
                              Message 14 of 20 , Sep 23, 2008
                                Hi Guys!

                                I cannot thank you enough for the information. Everything is cleared up now with the A/P and edition numbers.

                                Just got one more question, what is the difference between an original print and a reproduction?

                                If I have a collage I made on a canvas or plywood and made prints on paper, when is a print an 'original print' or a reproduction since both are 'reproduction' of the original art work? If I do not put a number or sign a print, can that be considered just a reproduction?

                                Am I making sense at all?

                                All the best and thank you again!

                                Eric
                              • Janet Jones
                                Hi, Eric, An original print is a work of art created by the artist that exists only as a print, such as etchings, woodcuts, digital collage and photographs.
                                Message 15 of 20 , Sep 24, 2008
                                  Hi, Eric,

                                  An original print is a work of art created by the artist that exists only as a print, such as etchings, woodcuts, digital collage and photographs. (The etching plate is not the original and the print the copy. The print is the original. The photographic negative is not the original, etc.)

                                  A reproduction is a copy, via offset lithography, inkjet print, giclee, etc. of a work that was created in another medium. So if you create an oil painting and have giclee prints made, they are reproductions. If you make a woodcut it is an original print. It is perfectly legitimate to have copies made of your collage on canvas, and you can even decide to make a numbered and signed edition of those copies, but they are reproductions, not original prints.

                                  Janet



                                  Hi Guys!

                                  I cannot thank you enough for the information. Everything is cleared up now with the A/P and edition numbers.

                                  Just got one more question, what is the difference between an original print and a reproduction?

                                  If I have a collage I made on a canvas or plywood and made prints on paper, when is a print an 'original print' or a reproduction since both are 'reproduction' of the original art work? If I do not put a number or sign a print, can that be considered just a reproduction?

                                  Am I making sense at all?

                                  All the best and thank you again!

                                  Eric





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Janet Jones
                                  Hi, Eric, Here s how it works: An original print is a work of art that exists only as a print. Woodcuts, etchings, photographs and digital collages are
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Sep 24, 2008
                                    Hi, Eric,

                                    Here's how it works: An original print is a work of art that exists only as a print. Woodcuts, etchings, photographs and digital collages are examples of original prints. (The etching plate is not the original and the print the reproduction, for instance.)

                                    A reproduction is a copy of an original work that was created in another medium. If you reproduce an oil painting via offset lithography, inkjet print or giclee, the oil painting is the original and the print is a reproduction. It is perfectly legitimate to decide on an edition size and number and sign giclee prints of your original collage on canvas, or you may sell prints signed but not numbered, as an open edition, but they are reproductions, not original prints.

                                    Hope this helps.

                                    Janet




                                    Hi Guys!

                                    I cannot thank you enough for the information. Everything is cleared up now with the A/P and edition numbers.

                                    Just got one more question, what is the difference between an original print and a reproduction?

                                    If I have a collage I made on a canvas or plywood and made prints on paper, when is a print an 'original print' or a reproduction since both are 'reproduction' of the original art work? If I do not put a number or sign a print, can that be considered just a reproduction?

                                    Am I making sense at all?

                                    All the best and thank you again!

                                    Eric





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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