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Re: Special Ammunition

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  • Xxxxx xxx
    Opens a whole nother can of worms. There was a C.O.G. project involving buried war supplies in covert locations. The idea was stockpiles to be issued after
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 12, 2004
      Opens a whole 'nother can of worms. There was a C.O.G. project
      involving buried war supplies in covert locations. The idea was
      stockpiles to be issued after the known arsenals were erased. So
      hush-hush that in Europe they forgot where some of them were and even
      last year construction crews were "discovering" some of them in S.
      Germany. There was a underground weapons depot I have been in (back
      in the early 70s) not too far from the West Point Bullion depository
      and I was told in the 90s of an old FPA complex that had quonset huts
      full of old WW2 weaponry when visited in the early 80s. (The one I
      was in had racks of Springfields and crates of Brownings. I was with
      Brinks in those days and we were dropping off ingots.) I have talked
      to someone else who was involved briefly in the Emergency War
      Stockpiles program and he said at least once he heard they buried the
      munitions in a vault, then built a house over it. It was on a
      military base and the house was made an officer's residence. Years
      later the base closed and the land was sold. He has always wondered
      if someone knowledgeable got the munitions out first, or did a new
      owner take possession and never know? Presumably somewhere in the
      archives or the Pentagon is a list of addresses just waiting for the day.


      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@a...>
      wrote:
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "David Lesher" <wb8foz@n...>
      > To: "Coldwar" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tuesday, June 22, 2004 12:27 AM
      > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Special Ammunition
      >
      >
      > > re: what was it?
      > >
      > > I asked someone who was there in various roles:
      > >
      > > |At this point a guess, based on the era and the ammunition plant,
      would
      > > |be the first generation of ICM (Improved Conventional Munitions),
      > > |probably both 105 and 155 rounds - don't think the 8" stuff was
      > > |available until well into the 70's
      >
      > Yes, apparently the term referred to specialized types of high-explosive
      > rounds rather than nuclear or chemical weapons. A list member noted
      that
      > the SA work in the mid-60s to early 70s was on Controlled Fragmentation
      > (COFRAM) munitions, the precursor to today's cluster munitions.
      >
      > Albert
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