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Meaning of "DUV"

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  • David Josephson
    In looking at several ex-Bell System microwave sites I have seen evidence of a number of systems that had been installed in the 60 s and 70 s and removed,
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 17, 2004
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      In looking at several ex-Bell System microwave sites I have seen
      evidence of a number of systems that had been installed in the 60's and
      70's and removed, mostly without a trace. Sites that I know had E/F
      radios for instance have generally shown no evidence of it. But there is
      a designation on the facility alarm light panels that puzzles me. Along
      with alarms for power, various mux and microwave systems is one marked
      DUV. What is that?
    • Albert LaFrance
      David, DUV stands for Data Under Voice . It was a technology developed to send digital data (a T1 channel, 1.544 Mb/S) on the Bell System s existing
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 17, 2004
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        David,

        DUV stands for "Data Under Voice". It was a technology developed to send
        digital data (a T1 channel, 1.544 Mb/S) on the Bell System's existing
        microwave radio networks, along with the normal analog voice channels. DUV
        was implemented as the 1A Radio Digital System.

        I'm glad you asked, because your question reminded me that I have a Bell
        Laboratories Record article on DUV contributed by a list member, which I
        somehow neglected to post. I'll try to get it online today.

        Albert

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "David Josephson" <david@...>
        To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, June 17, 2004 1:12 PM
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] Meaning of "DUV"


        >
        > In looking at several ex-Bell System microwave sites I have seen
        > evidence of a number of systems that had been installed in the 60's and
        > 70's and removed, mostly without a trace. Sites that I know had E/F
        > radios for instance have generally shown no evidence of it. But there is
        > a designation on the facility alarm light panels that puzzles me. Along
        > with alarms for power, various mux and microwave systems is one marked
        > DUV. What is that?
        >
      • Albert LaFrance
        I ve posted the first of three Bell Laboratories Record articles, contributed by Al Hajny, discussing DUV:
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 17, 2004
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          I've posted the first of three Bell Laboratories Record articles,
          contributed by Al Hajny, discussing DUV:
          http://long-lines.net/tech-equip/radio/BLR1273/DUV1-1273.html

          Albert
        • Dexter McIntyre W4DEX
          There was similar facility called DOV (data over voice) used on the L4 system. DUV was what would now be considered labor-intensive to set up. It took a
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 18, 2004
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            There was similar facility called "DOV" (data over voice) used on the L4
            system. DUV was what would now be considered "labor-intensive" to set up.
            It took a lot of time, test equipment and a good technician to get it
            right.

            Dexter
          • David Lesher
            ... The rather staggering aspect in the data rate. All this effort, all this expense... just to add a sole DS1 to the while route! The fiber guys were
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 18, 2004
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              Speaking on Deep Background, the Press Secretary whispered:
              >
              > There was similar facility called "DOV" (data over voice) used on the L4
              > system. DUV was what would now be considered "labor-intensive" to set up.
              > It took a lot of time, test equipment and a good technician to get it
              > right.

              The rather staggering aspect in the data rate. All this effort,
              all this expense... just to add a sole DS1 to the while route!

              The fiber guys were rerouting a bundle into a building yesterday
              as I walked by. Chatted with the splicer. ISTM it was 268
              strand. That's 134 pairs. Say OC-192 on each, even before you
              go to Dense Wave Division Multiplex to each.....


              --
              A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
              & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
              Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
              is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
            • Paul J Zawada
              ... In this day and age, it s hard to fathom that AT&T had so few digital long haul facilities into the early 80s. T1 was developed as an intracity,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 18, 2004
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                On Jun 18, 2004, at 8:00 AM, David Lesher wrote:

                > Speaking on Deep Background, the Press Secretary whispered:
                >>
                >> There was similar facility called "DOV" (data over voice) used on
                >> the L4
                >> system. DUV was what would now be considered "labor-intensive" to
                >> set up.
                >> It took a lot of time, test equipment and a good technician to get it
                >> right.
                >
                > The rather staggering aspect in the data rate. All this effort,
                > all this expense... just to add a sole DS1 to the while route!
                >

                In this day and age, it's hard to fathom that AT&T had so few digital
                long haul facilities into the early '80s. T1 was developed as an
                intracity, interoffice technology, intended to simplify the deployment
                of trunks between local offices and lessen the BOCs' use of copper
                under the streets. AT&T never envisioned running T1s for hundreds or
                thousands of miles. DS1 circuits would have to be transmitted over
                long distances utilizing some other technology. I once attended a talk
                given by a fairly prominent network researcher who complained on and on
                about how the Telephone Company would not give him access to long haul
                DS1 cicuits in the 1970s. I don't think he realized how few long-haul
                DS1s there really were at that time.

                That said, the DDS network was very efficient. "Sub-datarate"
                multiplexers were used to mux multiple "slow" (1200 bps, 2400 bps, etc)
                circuits into a single 64 kbps channel. Thus, a single DUV/DOV DS1 had
                the potential to carry hundreds leased data circuits rather than the
                just the the 24 channels we think of today... Still just a drop in the
                bucket compared to the optical systems deployed today... 1.544 Mbps is
                still 1.544 MBps no matter how many ways you slice it up. :-)

                --zawada
              • David Lesher
                ... That rings true. From what a Naperville employee friend told me, it took Candice Bergen/Sprint to really force ATT into non-local digital. Another gadget
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 18, 2004
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                  Speaking on Deep Background, the Press Secretary whispered:
                  >
                  >
                  > In this day and age, it's hard to fathom that AT&T had so few digital
                  > long haul facilities into the early '80s. T1 was developed as an
                  > intracity, interoffice technology, intended to simplify the deployment
                  > of trunks between local offices and lessen the BOCs' use of copper
                  > under the streets. AT&T never envisioned running T1s for hundreds or
                  > thousands of miles. DS1 circuits would have to be transmitted over
                  > long distances utilizing some other technology. I once attended a talk
                  > given by a fairly prominent network researcher who complained on and on
                  > about how the Telephone Company would not give him access to long haul
                  > DS1 cicuits in the 1970s. I don't think he realized how few long-haul
                  > DS1s there really were at that time.

                  That rings true. From what a Naperville employee friend told me,
                  it took Candice Bergen/Sprint to really force ATT into non-local
                  digital.

                  Another gadget I've not seen mentioned is the LT-1 connector. It
                  turned 2 groups [i.e. 12 channels] directly into a DS1. Interesting
                  trick, to say the least.


                  --
                  A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
                  & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
                  Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
                  is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
                • ozob99
                  ... digital ... deployment ... or ... over ... talk ... and on ... haul ... long-haul ... These was essentially back to back analog & digital channel banks(A6
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 19, 2004
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                    --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, David Lesher <wb8foz@n...> wrote:
                    > Speaking on Deep Background, the Press Secretary whispered:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > In this day and age, it's hard to fathom that AT&T had so few
                    digital
                    > > long haul facilities into the early '80s. T1 was developed as an
                    > > intracity, interoffice technology, intended to simplify the
                    deployment
                    > > of trunks between local offices and lessen the BOCs' use of copper
                    > > under the streets. AT&T never envisioned running T1s for hundreds
                    or
                    > > thousands of miles. DS1 circuits would have to be transmitted
                    over
                    > > long distances utilizing some other technology. I once attended a
                    talk
                    > > given by a fairly prominent network researcher who complained on
                    and on
                    > > about how the Telephone Company would not give him access to long
                    haul
                    > > DS1 cicuits in the 1970s. I don't think he realized how few
                    long-haul
                    > > DS1s there really were at that time.
                    >
                    > That rings true. From what a Naperville employee friend told me,
                    > it took Candice Bergen/Sprint to really force ATT into non-local
                    > digital.
                    >
                    > Another gadget I've not seen mentioned is the LT-1 connector. It
                    > turned 2 groups [i.e. 12 channels] directly into a DS1. Interesting
                    > trick, to say the least.




                    These was essentially back to back analog & digital channel banks(A6 &
                    D4/5 at the time)with A-D conversion between them.The analog side
                    appeared in the Group Distributing Frame(GDF)as two 12 channel
                    groups(two channel banks);and the digital side appeared in the Digital
                    Cross Connect Frame(DSX)like a D4(24) channel bank. The WeCo LT-1 &
                    LT-2 Transmultiplexers(T-MUX)never really got in production because at
                    that time(late 70's thru mid 80's)the WeCo Merrimac Valley Works(North
                    Andover,MA)was overloaded with LMX-3 and DDS plug in demands and
                    could'nt ramp up to the numbers;so Grainger Associates T-MUX's were
                    used because they could meet the demand, and at a cheaper price to
                    boot(still several thousand dollars per bay).Price was important
                    because these were interim "throw away" items, useless after a few
                    years of A to D conversion in the offices.

                    Regarding the plug in shortage mentioned, i know of one incident where
                    an engineering mgr was flown up to Merrimac Valley to "liberate" some
                    LMX-3 plug-ins from the assembly line & fly back that day to deliver
                    them to a Washington office in order to meet a service date;and many
                    offices were ordered to ship their plug in's for new services in say 2
                    weeks, to an office needing them in 3 days;then that office would ship
                    their plugs coming in about a week later(late) to the "sending office"
                    to meet their dates.It was a mini-crisis in some areas.

                    Another manifestation of AT&T's failure to accurately forecast the
                    magnitude and exponential growth of the digital revolution in the
                    80's.


                    >
                    >
                    > --
                    > A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@n...
                    > & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
                    > Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
                    > is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
                  • Albert LaFrance
                    Here s the second Bell Laboratories Record article on DUV, from May 1974, courtesy of Al Hajny: http://long-lines.net/tech-equip/radio/BLR0574/DUV1-0574.html
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 19, 2004
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                      Here's the second Bell Laboratories Record article on DUV, from May 1974,
                      courtesy of Al Hajny:
                      http://long-lines.net/tech-equip/radio/BLR0574/DUV1-0574.html

                      Albert
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