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at&t late to the internet game

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  • doug humphrey
    ... Generally speaking, AT&T was late to the game - while it is certainly likely that some internet traffic travelled over AT&T circuits, even way back in the
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2004
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      >
      > Is it just a coincidence that this cable runs right by "MAE-East,"
      > which was MCI's major switch for internet traffic? Did AT&T carry
      > very much of the Internet in the early days (i.e. 1990-1995)?

      Generally speaking, AT&T was late to the game - while it is
      certainly likely that some internet traffic travelled over AT&T
      circuits, even way back in the Arpanet days when it would
      have been Long Lines or nuthin', but these were just point
      to point telco circuits (DS0 or DS1 or DS3) and the telco
      providing would not have any idea what they were being used
      for, just customers buying circuits.... there has never been
      any specific infrastructure for transmission of internet traffic
      (i.e. see the blue cable? that is for internet) Of course there
      have been specific facilities for it like the MAE-EAST and
      other traffic exchange points (NAPS etc) that have not been
      part of the normal switched-circuit telco infrastructure, but
      with minimal exceptions (like between racks, and maybe
      between buildings) the internet is just a big data network
      that uses DS0 (not much any more) DS1, DS3 and OCx
      where x ranges from 3 to 192 (and soon 768) as the
      underlying backbone.

      One interesting note - the way that the protocols are evolving
      sometime in the not too far off future the internet will effectively
      stop being over telco, and telco will be operating over the
      internet (well, IP protocol stack - not needed to be connected
      to the actual internet) - and pretty much nobody will notice the
      cutover - that is an amazing thing really.

      doug
    • David Lesher
      ... Indeed. Remember the reason the L-coax system was shut down years before its planned lifetime -- Sprint had laid fiber and Candice Bergen was busting ATT s
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2004
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        Speaking on Deep Background, the Press Secretary whispered:
        >
        > >
        > > Is it just a coincidence that this cable runs right by "MAE-East,"
        > > which was MCI's major switch for internet traffic? Did AT&T carry
        > > very much of the Internet in the early days (i.e. 1990-1995)?
        >
        > Generally speaking, AT&T was late to the game - while it is
        > certainly likely that some internet traffic travelled over AT&T
        > circuits, even way back in the Arpanet days when it would
        > have been Long Lines or nuthin', but these were just point
        > to point telco circuits (DS0 or DS1 or DS3) and the telco
        > providing would not have any idea what they were being used
        > for, just customers buying circuits.... there has never been
        > any specific infrastructure for transmission of internet traffic


        Indeed. Remember the reason the L-coax system was shut down years
        before its planned lifetime -- Sprint had laid fiber and Candice
        Bergen was busting ATT's chops with the "pin drop" commercials.

        Analog muxing al-la supergroup/mastergroup traded quality for
        capacity. It took the FAR wider bandwidth of light over fiber
        to make digital viable. (And the non-so-minor improvements in
        laser/photodiodes/ digital electronics etc....)

        So the idea that ATT built analog facilities for the
        then-non-existent digital demands of the 'Net? Naw...

        What I've often wondered about was -- did FAA demands influence
        Long-Lines planning? (We KNOW that NASA did.) But on Albert's
        Ohio maps, there's a route shown going through Elyria. Elyria is
        ~adjacent to Oberlin. Oberlin has but two things: a noted college,
        and the busiest Air Route Traffic Control Center in the world.
        Oberlin was/is served by an independent, but I can't recall which.
        (It's long since been swallowed up...)

        During tours in the late 60's/70's; I recall being told that ATT
        had had to run their own facilities in when the Center was built
        in the early 1960s. But no one I can find knows of any notable
        ATT facility in either Elyria [also independent] or Oberlin.





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        Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
        is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
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