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AT&T IP Backbone map

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  • Albert LaFrance
    http://www.alliancedatacom.com/att-backbone-map.htm The map might be of interest because one of the nodes shown is the Middletown, VA site I mentioned earlier.
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 6, 1999
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      http://www.alliancedatacom.com/att-backbone-map.htm

      The map might be of interest because one of the nodes shown is the
      Middletown, VA site I mentioned earlier. I've learned from another
      researcher that Middletown is now a co-location site for the web servers
      hosting AT&T's commercial customers.

      Also, I think some of the paths shown may be former L-carrier routes.

      I believe the "Washington DC" node is actually Monrovia, or maybe a
      combination of Dranesville and Monrovia. As I noted earlier, I'm unaware
      of any fiber route from Middletown - just the two microwave paths.

      ...Albert
    • Mark Foster
      None of the paths correspond to L carrier routes that I know of. Fiber could be in the overhead plant?
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 6, 1999
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        None of the paths correspond to L carrier routes that I know of.


        Fiber could be in the overhead plant?


        At 06:45 PM 11/6/1999 -0500, you wrote:
        >From: Albert LaFrance <ALaFrance@...>
        >
        >http://www.alliancedatacom.com/att-backbone-map.htm
        >
        >The map might be of interest because one of the nodes shown is the
        >Middletown, VA site I mentioned earlier. I've learned from another
        >researcher that Middletown is now a co-location site for the web servers
        >hosting AT&T's commercial customers.
        >
        >Also, I think some of the paths shown may be former L-carrier routes.
        >
        >I believe the "Washington DC" node is actually Monrovia, or maybe a
        >combination of Dranesville and Monrovia. As I noted earlier, I'm unaware
        >of any fiber route from Middletown - just the two microwave paths.
        >
        >...Albert
        >
        >
      • Mike Jacobs
        From what I know, AT&T does not generally use overhead fiber in its intercity plant. A few years ago I had lunch with a vice president from AT&T s network
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 6, 1999
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          From what I know, AT&T does not generally use overhead fiber in
          its intercity plant. A few years ago I had lunch with a vice
          president from AT&T's network management center in Conyers, GA
          and we discussed fiber survivability. The majority of their fiber at
          that time was plowed into the railbed along many major rail routes,
          including the Northeast Corridor and the Conrail main lines. There
          was concern at that time because MCI had just signed for right of
          way along the same routes, , and AT&T was worried that if their
          contractors had been sloppy in plowing their cables in, they could
          protrude into the space to be used by MCI. In the areas of PA and
          NJ where I worked for Bell Atlantic, we sometimes shared conduit
          plant with AT&T fiber. At least in the northeast, I would surmise
          that AT&T's fiber is all either buried or underground (the distinction
          is that buried fiber has the cable directly in contact with the ground,
          and that underground fiber(or cable) is in a conduit run)

          .
          Mike Jacobs, N3YAV
          Antenna and RF Engineering Laboratory
          Penn State University
          State College, PA
        • Mark Foster
          Several sources indicated the original fiber in the northeast was laid in the L carrier NY to Boston route. I can personally verify the MA portion.
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 7, 1999
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            Several sources indicated the original fiber in the northeast was laid in the
            L carrier NY to Boston route. I can personally verify the MA portion.


            At 07:25 PM 11/6/1999 -0500, you wrote:
            >From: "Mike Jacobs" <mwj116@...>
            >
            > >From what I know, AT&T does not generally use overhead fiber in
            >its intercity plant. A few years ago I had lunch with a vice
            >president from AT&T's network management center in Conyers, GA
            >and we discussed fiber survivability. The majority of their fiber at
            >that time was plowed into the railbed along many major rail routes,
            >including the Northeast Corridor and the Conrail main lines. There
            >was concern at that time because MCI had just signed for right of
            >way along the same routes, , and AT&T was worried that if their
            >contractors had been sloppy in plowing their cables in, they could
            >protrude into the space to be used by MCI. In the areas of PA and
            >NJ where I worked for Bell Atlantic, we sometimes shared conduit
            >plant with AT&T fiber. At least in the northeast, I would surmise
            >that AT&T's fiber is all either buried or underground (the distinction
            >is that buried fiber has the cable directly in contact with the ground,
            >and that underground fiber(or cable) is in a conduit run)
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