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WE 4ESS test equipment

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  • Albert LaFrance
    OZOB99 has contributed photos of test equipment associated with the Western Electric No. 4 Electronic Switching System. The 4ESS was introduced in 1976 and is
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 16, 2003
      OZOB99 has contributed photos of test equipment associated with the Western
      Electric No. 4 Electronic Switching System. The 4ESS was introduced in 1976
      and is still the foundation of AT&T's switched network:
      http://longlines.addr.com/tech-equip/switching/4ESS.html

      Albert
    • Sam Etler
      ... Something interesting I noticed in the second picture is that the TSI frames seem to be on raised floor. Most of the COs I ve seen have not had flooring
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 16, 2003
        > OZOB99 has contributed photos of test equipment associated with the Western
        > Electric No. 4 Electronic Switching System. The 4ESS was introduced in 1976
        > and is still the foundation of AT&T's switched network:
        > http://longlines.addr.com/tech-equip/switching/4ESS.html

        Something interesting I noticed in the second picture is that the TSI
        frames seem to be on raised floor. Most of the COs I've seen have not had
        flooring like this in the actual switch rooms. Or perhaps I've just not
        seen any like this.

        What's the date on the publication? Going by the wording I'd guess close
        to 1976. Perhaps that's the prototype or something.

        sam
      • dcat4955@bellsouth.net
        none of the bellsouth c.o. s ive been in have raised flooring. could this be a pic from a test bed switch? one that western was using as there guniea pig?
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 16, 2003
          none of the bellsouth c.o.'s ive been in have raised flooring. could this be a pic from a test bed switch? one that western was using as there guniea pig?

          robert

          >
          > From: Sam Etler <etler@...>
          > Date: 2003/06/16 Mon PM 08:54:31 EDT
          > To: Cold War Comms list <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
          > CC: David Krugler <kruglerd@...>
          > Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] WE 4ESS test equipment
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Albert LaFrance
          ... From: Sam Etler To: Cold War Comms list Cc: David Krugler Sent: Monday,
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Sam Etler" <etler@...>
            To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
            Cc: "David Krugler" <kruglerd@...>
            Sent: Monday, June 16, 2003 8:54 PM
            Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] WE 4ESS test equipment


            > Something interesting I noticed in the second picture is that the TSI
            > frames seem to be on raised floor. Most of the COs I've seen have not had
            > flooring like this in the actual switch rooms. Or perhaps I've just not
            > seen any like this.

            I've visited one active 4ESS center, and another building which had been
            remodeled in anticipation of an 4ESS which was never installed. Both had a
            raised floor in the switchroom. The difference may be that the ESS machines
            for local service were packaged to fit into the traditional CO environment
            of bays, aisles and overhead cabling, while the toll switches were intended
            for installation in rooms designed "from the ground up" for that specific
            equipment.

            Also, note the partition with windows in the left background of the top
            picture. At the 4ESS sites I was in, the switch was in its own room,
            separated from the control room (which also had a raised floor) by a
            partition like that. I'm guessing that was part of a standard design of
            4ESS installations.

            Albert
          • Sam Etler
            ... Interesting. The only 4ESS I ve visited was the one in San Jose and that didn t have raised floor in any of the switch rooms. San Jose is a fairly old
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
              > I've visited one active 4ESS center, and another building which had been
              > remodeled in anticipation of an 4ESS which was never installed. Both had a
              > raised floor in the switchroom. The difference may be that the ESS machines
              > for local service were packaged to fit into the traditional CO environment
              > of bays, aisles and overhead cabling, while the toll switches were intended
              > for installation in rooms designed "from the ground up" for that specific
              > equipment.

              Interesting. The only 4ESS I've visited was the one in San Jose and that
              didn't have raised floor in any of the switch rooms. San Jose is a fairly
              old installation, 1982 I believe, and the office, 95 Almaden, has local
              switches as well. So that may have some factor in it.

              I do recall the control room having raised floors and also about an inch
              of dust on everything since it was no longer used. Most of the 4Es in
              AT&T's network (if not all) are administered remotely these days and
              there's a small crew on hand to make physical repairs.

              AT&T also has a 5ESS there acting as an Edge Switch on their toll network
              and that was on raised flooring if I recall. This was a couple years ago
              so my memory is a bit hazy.

              sam

              > Also, note the partition with windows in the left background of the top
              > picture. At the 4ESS sites I was in, the switch was in its own room,
              > separated from the control room (which also had a raised floor) by a
              > partition like that. I'm guessing that was part of a standard design of
              > 4ESS installations.
              >
              > Albert
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
            • Richard Bomboy
              ... On the subject of raised floors, Back in the early to mid 70 s there was a company called Blazon that made a computer room/dept system known as
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
                >
                >didn't have raised floor in any of the switch rooms.

                On the subject of raised floors, Back in the early to mid 70's there was a
                company called Blazon
                that made a computer room/dept system known as ComputaTemp. The sys
                consisted of a 'central'
                HVAC unit that besides heat & cool, it was tasked to humidified using steam
                and dehumidified not
                cooling the air (reheat) and electrostaticly clean the air, had fire
                suppressant AND added odor control.

                These systems were specked with a raised floor appox 12" high so the Blazon
                dumped conditioned air into the plenum the raised floor made and any
                computer or other item needing air conditioning could just remove a floor
                tile and let the air into the machine and back out to be recirculated. In
                this manner one could rearrange the computer weekly if needed and a lot of
                time it was needed given how they were 'programmed' then. What it wasn't
                was cheap to run, it was good at it's job but very expensive to operate.


                Dick
              • Jim Burks
                ... Most class A and B computer rooms have a similar layout today, with a raised floor 12-24 , and air conditioning blown under the floor, blowing air up into
                Message 7 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
                  Richard Bomboy wrote:

                  >On the subject of raised floors, Back in the early to mid 70's there
                  > was a company called Blazon
                  > that made a computer room/dept system known as ComputaTemp.

                  Most class A and B computer rooms have a similar layout today,
                  with a raised floor 12-24", and air conditioning blown under
                  the floor, blowing air up into or in front of the racks.

                  The most common HVAC unit is a Liebert, which is Freon based,
                  and has an outside unit with two fans and coils, and two
                  compressors on the inside. Electric resistance heat. Water
                  supply (for humidity) and a drain for dehumidification
                  (which involves cooling, then heating, if no temp change
                  is needed).

                  Completely redundant. Runs on 240 or 480v three-phase.
                  Remote monitoring equipped.

                  We have about 8 covering a 20,000 sf data center at work.
                  They hold the temp +/- 2 degrees around the set point,
                  and within 5% of the relative humidity set point.

                  They must be extremely expensive to run, especially
                  when dehumidifying, but the computer room is always
                  most comfortable, even in a Memphis summer.

                  The building maintenance guy says we are cooling,
                  even in the dead of winter.

                  Jim Burks
                • Richard Bomboy
                  ... Did a banking center once with a roof top unit that had 12 zones coming off the front of it, that is it had two rows of 12 4 X 8 outlets for air -, top
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
                    At 09:44 PM 6/17/03 -0500, you wrote:
                    >Richard Bomboy wrote:
                    >
                    > >On the subject of raised floors, Back in the early to mid 70's there
                    > > was a company called Blazon
                    > > that made a computer room/dept system known as ComputaTemp.
                    >
                    >Most class A and B computer rooms have a similar layout today,
                    >with a raised floor 12-24", and air conditioning blown under
                    >the floor, blowing air up into or in front of the racks.

                    Did a banking center once with a roof top unit that had 12 'zones' coming
                    off the front of it, that is it had two rows of 12 4" X 8" outlets for air
                    -, top row
                    was cooled and bottom was heated, there were two mixing vanes that blended
                    a percentage of each air stream to suit the settings of a remote Environmental
                    Center Device for each of the 12 zones, once the air left the "Zoner" it was
                    adjusted for humidity + or - discharge condition, and of course reheat if
                    needed.
                    There were four Carrier six clynder L head compressors and eight condenser
                    fans, ran on 660 including the Endicio elec heat.
                    The unit was manf by Nesbitt I think and was a full semi load for a flat
                    bed trailer


                    Dick
                  • Eric F. Richards
                    ... Believe them. I was there when one of these failed, and the temperature of a small computer room shot from 69 to over 100 in less than 20 minutes. Had
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
                      At 09:44 PM 6/17/2003 -0500, you wrote:
                      >The most common HVAC unit is a Liebert, [...]



                      >The building maintenance guy says we are cooling,
                      >even in the dead of winter.
                      >
                      >Jim Burks

                      Believe them. I was there when one of these failed, and the
                      temperature of a small computer room shot from 69 to over 100 in
                      less than 20 minutes. Had some of our equipment not had its own
                      environmental warning sensors, we would have lost some very expensive
                      gear.

                      This was in 1985. Two VAXes, a data switch (port selector) disk server
                      and about 20 disk drives.

                      --
                      Eric F. Richards
                      efricha@...
                      "The weird part is that I can feel productive even when I'm doomed."
                      - Dilbert
                    • blitz
                      Yes, Ericsson also mfgs a similar system...we used both at MCI.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jun 17, 2003
                        Yes, Ericsson also mfgs a similar system...we used both at MCI.



                        >The most common HVAC unit is a Liebert, which is Freon based,
                        >and has an outside unit with two fans and coils, and two
                        >compressors on the inside. Electric resistance heat. Water
                        >supply (for humidity) and a drain for dehumidification
                        >(which involves cooling, then heating, if no temp change
                        >is needed).
                      • kb9yku
                        at one time Nesbitt was owned my itt the place that made radios for the army and makes satellites too day ken uhrick kb9yku ... [Non-text portions of this
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jun 18, 2003
                          at one time
                          Nesbitt
                          was owned my itt
                          the place that made radios for the army
                          and makes satellites too day
                          ken uhrick
                          kb9yku



                          At 11:19 PM 6/17/03 -0400, Richard Bomboy wrote:
                          >At 09:44 PM 6/17/03 -0500, you wrote:
                          > >Richard Bomboy wrote:
                          > >
                          > > >On the subject of raised floors, Back in the early to mid 70's there
                          > > > was a company called Blazon
                          > > > that made a computer room/dept system known as ComputaTemp.
                          > >
                          > >Most class A and B computer rooms have a similar layout today,
                          > >with a raised floor 12-24", and air conditioning blown under
                          > >the floor, blowing air up into or in front of the racks.
                          >
                          >Did a banking center once with a roof top unit that had 12 'zones' coming
                          >off the front of it, that is it had two rows of 12 4" X 8" outlets for air
                          >-, top row
                          >was cooled and bottom was heated, there were two mixing vanes that blended
                          >a percentage of each air stream to suit the settings of a remote Environmental
                          >Center Device for each of the 12 zones, once the air left the "Zoner" it was
                          >adjusted for humidity + or - discharge condition, and of course reheat if
                          >needed.
                          >There were four Carrier six clynder L head compressors and eight condenser
                          >fans, ran on 660 including the Endicio elec heat.
                          >The unit was manf by Nesbitt I think and was a full semi load for a flat
                          >bed trailer





                          >Dick
                          >
                          >
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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • ozob99
                          ... Western ... introduced in 1976 ... One of the early test sets used in 4E s was the WeCo DATS(digital access test set),either built in a console or
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jun 24, 2003
                            --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance"
                            <lafrance@w...> wrote:
                            > OZOB99 has contributed photos of test equipment associated with the
                            Western
                            > Electric No. 4 Electronic Switching System. The 4ESS was
                            introduced in 1976
                            > and is still the foundation of AT&T's switched network:
                            > http://longlines.addr.com/tech-equip/switching/4ESS.html
                            >
                            > Albert

                            One of the early test sets used in 4E's was the WeCo DATS(digital
                            access test set),either built in a console or portable. It bridged in
                            a DS-1 and enabled monitoring/testing each of the 24 channels;kinda
                            like a miniature D4 channel bank.A number of commercial equivalent
                            (and smaller) test sets came later.
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