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Upper Strasburg and Bedford-Harrisburg Coax Link

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  • Brady Alleman
    I ve been identifying repeater huts on the Bedford-Harrisburg (PA) coax link. Does anyone have any information on the link? The repeaters seem to be 3-4
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 1, 2003
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      I've been identifying repeater huts on the Bedford-Harrisburg (PA) coax
      link. Does anyone have any information on the link? The repeaters seem
      to be 3-4 airmiles apart.

      Also, maps of the area near Upper Strasburg, PA seem inconsistent.
      Today I visited a long lines building near Upper Strasburg, across the
      road from Letterkenny Army Depot. Some maps seem to indicate that the
      Bedford-Harrsiburg link went through this building, others do not. What
      seems most consistent is that Upper Strasburg was used as a wire-pair
      carrier connection point. Also, one map I saw had a link from Clark's
      Knob to Letterkenny. Does anyone have any details with how Letterkenny
      connected with the Long Lines system?

      Thanks,
      Brady Alleman
    • Albert LaFrance
      ... From: Brady Alleman To: Cold War Comms list Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 8:55 AM Subject:
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 1, 2003
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Brady Alleman" <coldwarcomms@...>
        To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 8:55 AM
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] Upper Strasburg and Bedford-Harrisburg Coax Link


        > I've been identifying repeater huts on the Bedford-Harrisburg (PA) coax
        > link. Does anyone have any information on the link? The repeaters seem
        > to be 3-4 airmiles apart.

        The distance between coax repeaters suggests an L3 route, which had an
        average four-mile repeater spacing. The L3 system, introduced in 1953,
        carried 1860 frequency-division-multiplexed one-way voice channels on a
        single coaxial conductor. Also, I think most of the L3 routes ran directly
        downtown-to-downtown, while the L4 and L5 cables which came later were
        "avoidance routed" around major cities, with the cities being served by spur
        lines from hardened main stations.

        > Also, maps of the area near Upper Strasburg, PA seem inconsistent.
        > Today I visited a long lines building near Upper Strasburg, across the
        > road from Letterkenny Army Depot. Some maps seem to indicate that the
        > Bedford-Harrsiburg link went through this building, others do not. What
        > seems most consistent is that Upper Strasburg was used as a wire-pair
        > carrier connection point. Also, one map I saw had a link from Clark's
        > Knob to Letterkenny. Does anyone have any details with how Letterkenny
        > connected with the Long Lines system?

        Unfortunately I don't have any knowledge of that specific area. Which maps
        do you have? I assume you've seen the 1970 map
        http://longlines.addr.com/places-routes/DC1970.html - that's the only cable
        map I have of the area. It supports your theory that Upper Strasburg was
        only a wire-pair carrier terminal.

        Have you found any of the original cable markers in the area? It might be a
        good idea to photograph them and record their exact locations, since their
        always at risk for loss due to construction and theft.

        BTW, the cable which goes south from Upper Strasburg is the Upper
        Strasburg-Lynchburg [VA], or "USL"
        cable, a very old route.

        Albert
      • ozob99
        ... Link ... coax ... repeaters seem ... an ... 1953, ... on a ... directly ... were ... by spur ... the ... the ... What ... wire-pair ... Clark s ...
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 1, 2003
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          --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@w...>
          wrote:
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Brady Alleman" <coldwarcomms@t...>
          > To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 8:55 AM
          > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Upper Strasburg and Bedford-Harrisburg Coax
          Link
          >
          >
          > > I've been identifying repeater huts on the Bedford-Harrisburg (PA)
          coax
          > > link. Does anyone have any information on the link? The
          repeaters seem
          > > to be 3-4 airmiles apart.
          >
          > The distance between coax repeaters suggests an L3 route, which had
          an
          > average four-mile repeater spacing. The L3 system, introduced in
          1953,
          > carried 1860 frequency-division-multiplexed one-way voice channels
          on a
          > single coaxial conductor. Also, I think most of the L3 routes ran
          directly
          > downtown-to-downtown, while the L4 and L5 cables which came later
          were
          > "avoidance routed" around major cities, with the cities being served
          by spur
          > lines from hardened main stations.
          >
          > > Also, maps of the area near Upper Strasburg, PA seem inconsistent.
          > > Today I visited a long lines building near Upper Strasburg, across
          the
          > > road from Letterkenny Army Depot. Some maps seem to indicate that
          the
          > > Bedford-Harrsiburg link went through this building, others do not.
          What
          > > seems most consistent is that Upper Strasburg was used as a
          wire-pair
          > > carrier connection point. Also, one map I saw had a link from
          Clark's
          > > Knob to Letterkenny. Does anyone have any details with how
          Letterkenny
          > > connected with the Long Lines system?
          >
          > Unfortunately I don't have any knowledge of that specific area.
          Which maps
          > do you have? I assume you've seen the 1970 map
          > http://longlines.addr.com/places-routes/DC1970.html - that's the
          only cable
          > map I have of the area. It supports your theory that Upper
          Strasburg was
          > only a wire-pair carrier terminal.
          >
          > Have you found any of the original cable markers in the area? It
          might be a
          > good idea to photograph them and record their exact locations, since
          their
          > always at risk for loss due to construction and theft.
          >
          > BTW, the cable which goes south from Upper Strasburg is the Upper
          > Strasburg-Lynchburg [VA], or "USL"
          > cable, a very old route.
          >
          > Albert

          I'd guess,without a map, that's the Harrisburg-Pittsburgh L3 route;I
          would'nt be surprised if Letterkenny had a cable or MW link to Clarks
          Knob as an alternate comms route if it served as a relocation site
          like the Radford,VA Arsenal.
        • Brady Alleman
          ... downtown-to-downtown. It would probably follow US Route 11 if that were the intent, passing through Carlisle and Shippensburg before reaching Upper
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 2, 2003
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            On Sun, 2003-06-01 at 16:04, Albert LaFrance wrote:
            > The distance between coax repeaters suggests an L3 route, which had an
            > average four-mile repeater spacing. The L3 system, introduced in 1953,
            > carried 1860 frequency-division-multiplexed one-way voice channels on a
            > single coaxial conductor. Also, I think most of the L3 routes ran directly
            > downtown-to-downtown, while the L4 and L5 cables which came later were
            > "avoidance routed" around major cities, with the cities being served by spur
            > lines from hardened main stations.

            >From what I've seen, this cable doesn't seem to run
            downtown-to-downtown. It would probably follow US Route 11 if that were
            the intent, passing through Carlisle and Shippensburg before reaching
            Upper Strasburg. The reason may have been more political than
            purposeful as the Carlisle-Shippensburg-Chambersburg area is a United
            Telephone of Pennsylvania (now Sprint) territory.

            >
            > Unfortunately I don't have any knowledge of that specific area. Which maps
            > do you have? I assume you've seen the 1970 map
            > http://longlines.addr.com/places-routes/DC1970.html - that's the only cable
            > map I have of the area. It supports your theory that Upper Strasburg was
            > only a wire-pair carrier terminal.

            I looked at that map, as well as two that were on the radio.ee.psu.edu
            site, which appears to be down currently. I've reposted the maps at
            http://thtech.net/maps/ if you'd like to take a look.
            >
            > Have you found any of the original cable markers in the area? It might be a
            > good idea to photograph them and record their exact locations, since their
            > always at risk for loss due to construction and theft.

            I've not found any markers yet. I've only been visually sighting the
            repeaters from the road.
            >
            > BTW, the cable which goes south from Upper Strasburg is the Upper
            > Strasburg-Lynchburg [VA], or "USL"
            > cable, a very old route.
            >
            > Albert

            I've also recently looked up the USGS maps of the Upper Strasburg area.
            They indicate the presence of a "telephone" line leaving the AT&T
            building in Upper Strasburg and ascending the mountain. It seems a spur
            then leads to Clark's knob from there. I hope to investigate that site
            more fully today.

            -Brady
          • umo1845
            ... had an ... in 1953, ... channels on a ... ran directly ... later were ... served by spur ... that were ... reaching ... United ... Which maps ... the only
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 9, 2003
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              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Brady Alleman
              <coldwarcomms@t...> wrote:
              > On Sun, 2003-06-01 at 16:04, Albert LaFrance wrote:
              > > The distance between coax repeaters suggests an L3 route, which
              had an
              > > average four-mile repeater spacing. The L3 system, introduced
              in 1953,
              > > carried 1860 frequency-division-multiplexed one-way voice
              channels on a
              > > single coaxial conductor. Also, I think most of the L3 routes
              ran directly
              > > downtown-to-downtown, while the L4 and L5 cables which came
              later were
              > > "avoidance routed" around major cities, with the cities being
              served by spur
              > > lines from hardened main stations.
              >
              > >From what I've seen, this cable doesn't seem to run
              > downtown-to-downtown. It would probably follow US Route 11 if
              that were
              > the intent, passing through Carlisle and Shippensburg before
              reaching
              > Upper Strasburg. The reason may have been more political than
              > purposeful as the Carlisle-Shippensburg-Chambersburg area is a
              United
              > Telephone of Pennsylvania (now Sprint) territory.
              >
              > >
              > > Unfortunately I don't have any knowledge of that specific area.
              Which maps
              > > do you have? I assume you've seen the 1970 map
              > > http://longlines.addr.com/places-routes/DC1970.html - that's
              the only cable
              > > map I have of the area. It supports your theory that Upper
              Strasburg was
              > > only a wire-pair carrier terminal.
              >
              > I looked at that map, as well as two that were on the
              radio.ee.psu.edu
              > site, which appears to be down currently. I've reposted the maps
              at
              > http://thtech.net/maps/ if you'd like to take a look.
              > >
              > > Have you found any of the original cable markers in the area?
              It might be a
              > > good idea to photograph them and record their exact locations,
              since their
              > > always at risk for loss due to construction and theft.
              >
              > I've not found any markers yet. I've only been visually sighting
              the
              > repeaters from the road.
              > >
              > > BTW, the cable which goes south from Upper Strasburg is the Upper
              > > Strasburg-Lynchburg [VA], or "USL"
              > > cable, a very old route.
              > >
              > > Albert
              >
              > I've also recently looked up the USGS maps of the Upper Strasburg
              area.
              > They indicate the presence of a "telephone" line leaving the AT&T
              > building in Upper Strasburg and ascending the mountain. It seems
              a spur
              > then leads to Clark's knob from there. I hope to investigate that
              site
              > more fully today.
              >
              > -Brady

              Does anyone know if the Bedford-Harrisburg link passes thru Camp
              Hill, PA? There is what appears to be a repeater hut (based on
              similar ones I've seen photos of) in a back ally off Market Street.
              Also remember seeing Long-Lines trucks frequently working in the
              area when I was in high School (1976-78)

              Dan
            • Brady Alleman
              ... If what you found is a coax repeater hut, I suspect you re right about it being on the Bedford-Harrisburg route. Projecting the route from the repeaters
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 14, 2003
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                On Tue, 2003-12-09 at 21:21, umo1845 wrote:
                > Does anyone know if the Bedford-Harrisburg link passes thru Camp
                > Hill, PA? There is what appears to be a repeater hut (based on
                > similar ones I've seen photos of) in a back ally off Market Street.
                > Also remember seeing Long-Lines trucks frequently working in the
                > area when I was in high School (1976-78)
                >
                > Dan

                If what you found is a coax repeater hut, I suspect you're right about
                it being on the Bedford-Harrisburg route. Projecting the route from the
                repeaters I've observed, it seems reasonable that the cable would go
                through Camp Hill.

                I've plotted the huts I've seen, if anyone is interested:
                http://www.thtech.net/maps/Bedford-Harrisburg-Map.png (2.2 MB)

                I haven't yet had any luck finding huts beyond those on the map. The
                "telephone" route I was tracking west of Upper Strasburg appears to have
                been open-wire.

                -Brady
              • umo1845
                ... Street. ... about ... from the ... go ... The ... to have ... I ll try to get a couple of photos & GPS Coord. of this one and see if I can locate any
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 18, 2003
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                  --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Brady Alleman
                  <coldwarcomms@t...> wrote:
                  > On Tue, 2003-12-09 at 21:21, umo1845 wrote:
                  > > Does anyone know if the Bedford-Harrisburg link passes thru Camp
                  > > Hill, PA? There is what appears to be a repeater hut (based on
                  > > similar ones I've seen photos of) in a back ally off Market
                  Street.
                  > > Also remember seeing Long-Lines trucks frequently working in the
                  > > area when I was in high School (1976-78)
                  > >
                  > > Dan
                  >
                  > If what you found is a coax repeater hut, I suspect you're right
                  about
                  > it being on the Bedford-Harrisburg route. Projecting the route
                  from the
                  > repeaters I've observed, it seems reasonable that the cable would
                  go
                  > through Camp Hill.
                  >
                  > I've plotted the huts I've seen, if anyone is interested:
                  > http://www.thtech.net/maps/Bedford-Harrisburg-Map.png (2.2 MB)
                  >
                  > I haven't yet had any luck finding huts beyond those on the map.
                  The
                  > "telephone" route I was tracking west of Upper Strasburg appears
                  to have
                  > been open-wire.
                  >
                  > -Brady

                  I'll try to get a couple of photos & GPS Coord. of this one and see
                  if I can locate any others.
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