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Re: AT&T Monrovia

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  • dsss_communications
    ... some ... floors ... sites ... site, ... radio, ... the ... Monrovia ... was ... was ... It never ceases to amaze me how, with a simple verbal command,
    Message 1 of 8 , May 29, 2003
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      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "ozob99" <ozob99@y...> wrote:
      > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, albertjlafrance@c... wrote:
      > > A former AT&T employee who worked at Monrovia has contributed
      some
      > very
      > > interesting information about the station.
      > >
      > > There are actually two undergound buildings, each having two
      floors
      > and a
      > > mezzanine, referred to simply as the "old building" and "new
      > building".
      > >
      > > Monrovia is considerably older than the other AT&T underground
      sites
      > I'm
      > > aware of. He began work there in early 1964, and thinks the old
      > building was
      > > built around 1961-62. Construction of the new building began in
      > 1964. The
      > > mezzanine in the new building was primarily a telco relocation
      site,
      > while
      > > that in the old building contained an AUTOVON switchboard.
      > >
      > > In the old building, the lowermost floor contained the LMX,
      radio,
      > mobile
      > > terminals, L3 equipment and the frame. The upper floor contained
      the
      > #5
      > > Crossbar and the power room.
      > >
      > > The age of the original building supports the theory that
      Monrovia
      > was the
      > > "Frederick" SCAN switch. In fact, the ex-AT&T employee believes
      > that
      > > Monrovia was originally known as "Frederick No. 2" (Frederick #1
      was
      > the
      > > local telco office, and Frederick #3 was located at the DoD East
      > Coast Relay
      > > station).
      > >
      > > Albert
      >
      > Frederick 2 was changed to "Monrovia" at the whim of a visiting VP
      > according to several old timers: A VP named Earl? Killingsworth
      > visited the office early on & had remarked it seemed a ways from
      > Frederick,he then asked where do you get your mail? & the answer
      was
      > Monrovia;he said that's what i want this office called.
      >
      > That policy may have stuck because some other attended offices like
      > Moseley got their name from the serving P.O.,not the closest place
      > name,which in Moseley's case was Skin Quarter.

      It never ceases to amaze me how, with a simple verbal command,
      hundreds - if not thousands - of peoples work is affected by such an
      action. Imagine the back-annotation of the documentation required to
      bring all references to this location up to date. Probably thousands
      of pounds of paperwork in those days. Computers were probably of
      little help.

      Greg
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