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Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AUTOVON cord switchboard

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  • David Lesher
    ... AUTOVON was end-to-end 4-wire for this very reason. It being LOTS easier to design/deploy/debug that 2W+hybrids. Trouble was, for whatever reason, you
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 31, 2003
      Unnamed Administration sources reported that Albert LaFrance said:
      >
      >
      > I'm glad you brought up the AUTOVON testboard. The technician at Monrovia
      > mentioned spending a lot of time on the 19A; he said an especially difficult
      > task was handling complaints about parties not being able to hear each other
      > on conference calls, especially when they included overseas circuits with
      > wide variations in signal levels from one line to another.


      AUTOVON was end-to-end 4-wire for this very reason. It being LOTS
      easier to design/deploy/debug that 2W+hybrids.

      Trouble was, for whatever reason, you still could not hear half
      the time, more than one user told me.




      --
      A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
      & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
      Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
      is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
    • ozob99 <ozob99@yahoo.com>
      ... Monrovia ... difficult ... each other ... circuits with ... This was common on most conferencing arrangements in analog days due to factors such as carrier
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 1, 2003
        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, David Lesher <wb8foz@n...> wrote:
        > Unnamed Administration sources reported that Albert LaFrance said:
        > >
        > >
        > > I'm glad you brought up the AUTOVON testboard. The technician at
        Monrovia
        > > mentioned spending a lot of time on the 19A; he said an especially
        difficult
        > > task was handling complaints about parties not being able to hear
        each other
        > > on conference calls, especially when they included overseas
        circuits with
        > > wide variations in signal levels from one line to another.
        >
        >
        > AUTOVON was end-to-end 4-wire for this very reason. It being LOTS
        > easier to design/deploy/debug that 2W+hybrids.
        >
        > Trouble was, for whatever reason, you still could not hear half
        > the time, more than one user told me.



        This was common on most conferencing arrangements in analog days due
        to factors such as carrier receive gain levels too high,same for VF
        amps connecting conference bridges,low return loss from defective or
        unbalanced(unused legs not terminated) bridges,feedback from some
        speaker phone arrangements; this was especially true on overseas
        connections due to lower quality maintenance & facilities in some
        countries.Another degrading factor was patches(usually prohibited
        becuz of feedback) into 2W lines with poor return loss.
      • ozob99 <ozob99@yahoo.com>
        ... which was ... switchboard! Was ... service for ... or were most of the problems due to broken wires, worn switches and ... These were typical
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 1, 2003
          --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance"
          <albertjlafrance@c...> wrote:
          > On the TCI list, a member suggested the board might be a model 5D,
          which was
          > the 4-wire version of the 3CL.
          >
          > I can imagine how hard it would be to troubleshoot a big
          switchboard! Was
          > it common to discover misrouted wires after a board had been in
          service for
          > a while,



          or were most of the problems due to broken wires, worn
          switches and
          > jacks, and bad solder joints?

          These were typical problems,repetitive plugging in caused of wear &
          loose/broken connections; and fixing one problem could cause another
          in the tight,hard to see cabling & jacks;the associated 17B & C
          testboards had fewer problems due to less use & no multiples except on
          test & misc jacks.

          A special soldering copper(WeCo's term for iron) was used;it was about
          2 feet long & very thin to get thru the cabling & wires, & required a
          steady hand & good eye;solder splashes from repair could cause another
          trouble later.
        • David Lesher
          ... Recall a Special Services man telling me of the time he was called in to Yellow Cab as one of the ?6-8 operators had dumped sugered/creamed coffee, lots of
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 1, 2003
            > I can imagine how hard it would be to troubleshoot a big switchboard!

            Recall a Special Services man telling me of the time he was
            called in to Yellow Cab as one of the ?6-8 operators had dumped
            sugered/creamed coffee, lots of it, into her cord board.



            --
            A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
            & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
            Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
            is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
          • Albert LaFrance
            From what I ve read about TSPS, it was a pretty flexible design, so both types of connections would seem feasible. The system was connected between the local
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 2, 2003
              From what I've read about TSPS, it was a pretty flexible design, so both
              types of connections would seem feasible.

              The system was connected between the local (Class 5) office and the toll
              office by dedicated trunks, which could be 2-wire or 4-wire. The consoles
              ("positions") themselves could be located remotely from the TSPS
              stored-program processor, connected to it by T1 channels which carried the
              operator's voice link and the console input-output data. And there was a
              Remote Trunk Arrangement which allowed one TSPS operator group to handle
              traffic from several smaller toll centers.

              TSPS was introduced in 1969, but a predecessor, called TSP, which worked
              with Crossbar Tandem switches, was placed in service in 1963-64.

              Albert

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: <ozob99@...>
              To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Friday, January 31, 2003 10:47 PM
              Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AUTOVON cord switchboard


              > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance"
              > <albertjlafrance@c...> wrote:
              > > That's interesting about the TSPS consoles at the project offices.
              > Do you
              > > know if they were connected to AUTOVON or to the PSN (or both)?
              > >
              > > Albert
              >
              >
              > I have heard both.
            • ozob99 <ozob99@yahoo.com>
              ... both ... toll ... consoles ... carried the ... was a ... handle ... worked ... Here is a pic of a TSPS operator & console:
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 2, 2003
                --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance"
                <albertjlafrance@c...> wrote:
                > From what I've read about TSPS, it was a pretty flexible design, so
                both
                > types of connections would seem feasible.
                >
                > The system was connected between the local (Class 5) office and the
                toll
                > office by dedicated trunks, which could be 2-wire or 4-wire. The
                consoles
                > ("positions") themselves could be located remotely from the TSPS
                > stored-program processor, connected to it by T1 channels which
                carried the
                > operator's voice link and the console input-output data. And there
                was a
                > Remote Trunk Arrangement which allowed one TSPS operator group to
                handle
                > traffic from several smaller toll centers.
                >
                > TSPS was introduced in 1969, but a predecessor, called TSP, which
                worked
                > with Crossbar Tandem switches, was placed in service in 1963-64.
                >
                > Albert
                >


                Here is a pic of a TSPS operator & console:

                http://home.speedfactory.net/cardwell/image/1971_operator.jpg
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