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Re: [coldwarcomms] New Facility?

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  • Paul Rosa
    Rick: These site numbers refer to the original Presidential Emergency Facilities (PEF) sites. The site plans that we have dating to 1962 show Lamb s Knoll
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 8, 2002
      Rick:

      These site numbers refer to the original Presidential Emergency
      Facilities (PEF) sites. The site plans that we have dating to 1962 show
      Lamb's Knoll (South Mountain, MD) as "Navy Site #7." Site #4 is
      adjacent to Reno Reservoir in DC. Albert LaFrance probably is the best
      authority on the chain and, hopefully, he'll read this and respond.

      "Rick C." wrote:

      > Site 4? Site 7? What grouping of sites (formally) do these numbers
      > refer
      > to, and what are 1-3, 5-6, 8-???
      >
      > Looks like, as many member of this list predicted shortly post Sept.
      > 11,
      > that the government was back in the bunker building business.
      >
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rick C.
      Paul- I was playing a little dumb there - should have been more specific in what I meant. I was wondering if anybody had a complete list of the site numbers
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 8, 2002
        Paul-
        I was playing a little dumb there - should have been more specific in
        what I meant. I was wondering if anybody had a complete list of the site
        numbers and their associated names. I recall Cannonball is #2, and Lamb's
        Knoll, but I was not aware of Ft. Reno.

        Rick


        >These site numbers refer to the original Presidential Emergency
        >Facilities (PEF) sites. The site plans that we have dating to 1962 show
        >Lamb's Knoll (South Mountain, MD) as "Navy Site #7." Site #4 is
        >adjacent to Reno Reservoir in DC. Albert LaFrance probably is the best
        >authority on the chain and, hopefully, he'll read this and respond.
        >
        >"Rick C." wrote:
        >

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      • Mike Makar <mikemakar@aol.com>
        Group, Another article about new facility. Neighbors Complain of Cheney Home Blasts Mon Dec 9, 9:54 AM ET Strange News - AP to My Yahoo! By JIM ABRAMS,
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 11, 2002
          Group, Another article about new facility.

          Neighbors Complain of Cheney Home Blasts
          Mon Dec 9, 9:54 AM ET Strange News - AP to My Yahoo!

          By JIM ABRAMS, Associated Press Writer

          WASHINGTON (AP) - Neighbors of Vice President Dick Cheney (news - web
          sites) are being shaken and rattled at least once a day by mysterious
          blasts at the U.S. Naval Observatory where Cheney lives.

          The Navy says the explosions are part of a construction project that
          has been going on for several months now, but won't say more because
          the project is classified.

          Navy spokeswoman Cate Mueller described the work as
          an "infrastructure improvement, a utility upgrade."

          She said they have tried to reassure the neighborhood, which includes
          the Washington residence of former President Bill and Sen. Hillary
          Clinton (news - web sites), that the blasts will not damage their
          homes. She said most understand that, because of national security
          concerns, they can't reveal details or confine the construction to a
          9 a.m. to 5 p.m. schedule.

          Joseph Rieser, who lives a half-block off Observatory Circle, said
          each blast was "almost like thunder because it rolls and it lasts a
          noticeable period, probably several seconds." It said the explosions
          rattle windows that aren't shut tight.

          He said his concern was that neighbors received no forewarning of the
          project. "If this were a normal construction contract I would expect
          that they would have told the neighbors."

          Mueller acknowledged that they were "not as aggressive up front in
          warning" neighbors about the project.

          She said the construction is expected to last another eight months,
          and for the time being there will be one or two blasts a day, each
          lasting about three to five seconds.

          The blasts were being carefully monitored to assure they were well
          under acceptable vibration standards so there would be no damage to
          either nearby residences or to facilities at the observatory, she
          said.

          The Naval Observatory moved to its present location on Massachusetts
          Ave. in Northwest Washington in 1893. The vice president took up
          residence on the site in 1974. It houses the master clock of the
          United States and telescopes dating back to a time when it was one of
          the premier astronomical observatories in the world.

          The Washington Post, which reported the issue Sunday, said David
          Gillard, the observatory's superintendent, had sent the local
          neighborhood commission a letter noting that "due to its sensitive
          nature in support of national security and homeland defense, project
          specific information is classified and cannot be released."

          Jennifer Millerwise, a spokeswoman for the vice president, referred
          questions about the project to the Navy.
          ___

          On the Net: Vice president's residence:
          http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/life/vpresidence.html

          U.S. Naval Observatory: http://www.usno.navy.mil/
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