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Re: Remote Radio

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  • teotwaki
    Hi, I often saw AT&T trucks that were really well equipped for off- roading: burly fenders, winches, lights, etc AND a low-band VHF whip. Never did nail down
    Message 1 of 29 , Jul 1 8:44 AM
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      Hi,

      I often saw AT&T trucks that were really well equipped for off-
      roading: burly fenders, winches, lights, etc AND a low-band VHF whip.

      Never did nail down the frequency. Might be archived somewhere on the
      net.

      Jim



      --- In coldwarcomms@y..., David Lesher <wb8foz@n...> wrote:

      > Thinking about it, it could have been "low band" i.e. ~30-50 mhz
      > at that time. Low band had/has an advantage of range over 150mhz &
      > 460 mhz.
    • ozob99
      ... whip. ... the ... That could have been the Long Lines construction gangs vehicles;they may have had their own frequencies(their function was not telephone
      Message 2 of 29 , Jul 1 9:26 AM
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        --- In coldwarcomms@y..., "teotwaki" <teotwaki@y...> wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > I often saw AT&T trucks that were really well equipped for off-
        > roading: burly fenders, winches, lights, etc AND a low-band VHF
        whip.
        >
        > Never did nail down the frequency. Might be archived somewhere on
        the
        > net.
        >
        > Jim


        That could have been the Long Lines construction gangs' vehicles;they
        may have had their own frequencies(their function was not telephone
        maintenance but laying cable & MW tower construction)) as well as
        channels to talk with the pipeline contractors & others.

        These guys were a different breed of telephone men;constantly
        traveling all over the country,many with their house trailers in tow.



        >
        >
        >
        > --- In coldwarcomms@y..., David Lesher <wb8foz@n...> wrote:
        >
        > > Thinking about it, it could have been "low band" i.e. ~30-50 mhz
        > > at that time. Low band had/has an advantage of range over 150mhz &
        > > 460 mhz.
      • Albert LaFrance
        Here s some info which might help in your search: a former Long Lines supervisor who worked at Monrovia noted that there was an L1 manhole in Havre de Grace,
        Message 3 of 29 , Jul 1 6:25 PM
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          Here's some info which might help in your search: a former Long Lines
          supervisor who worked at Monrovia noted that there was an L1 manhole in
          Havre de Grace, in the sidewalk along Rt. 40 just before the Susquehanna
          River crossing. He recalls that the cable might have been in conduit (i.e.
          "underground"), rather than direct-buried.

          Also, he mentioned that Monrovia was home to the division's "corona truck".
          This vehicle was equipped for testing coaxial cable installations' ability
          to withstand the high voltages applied to them for powering the
          series-connected repeaters.

          Albert

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Rick C." <rickchem@...>
          To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, June 29, 2002 9:30 PM
          Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] AT&T NYC-DC L1 coax route


          > Interesting!
          > I did some poking around today in NE Maryland, trying to map the route.
          I
          > too found a lone marker, about a hundred yards off of US 40 on MD 279.
          This
          > is within a half mile of the railroad, so it is possible it vears off the
          RR
          > ROW here for some reason. The marker was newer however, standard 4x4 with
          > the fiber placard. I could not locate another marker within the area - if
          > the line splits from the RR or rejoins it, there should be a US 40
          crossing,
          > but I did not see it. No visible RoW either, or arrow on the pole as
          > normal. It was also on the same RoW as the state of Maryland fiber
          > backbone; perhaps it ws placed there when that fiber was laid a year or so
          > ago, to indicate an AT&T crossing.
          > I'm going back to the site in the next few days . . . more info to
          come!
        • Mike Doughney
          ... (i.e. ... This connects with something I saw about two weeks ago. Driving Route 40 south between Havre De Grace and Aberdeen, I saw a red brick building on
          Message 4 of 29 , Jul 1 8:04 PM
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            Albert wrote:

            > Here's some info which might help in your search: a former Long Lines
            > supervisor who worked at Monrovia noted that there was an L1 manhole in
            > Havre de Grace, in the sidewalk along Rt. 40 just before the Susquehanna
            > River crossing. He recalls that the cable might have been in conduit
            (i.e.
            > "underground"), rather than direct-buried.

            This connects with something I saw about two weeks ago. Driving Route 40
            south between Havre De Grace and Aberdeen, I saw a red brick building on the
            north side of the highway that looked like it might at one time been some
            kind of utility building. It is now part of a body shop. I think it could
            have been an old AT&T facility of some kind, and if the L1 cable did follow
            Route 40 in that area this might be related to that.

            I'd go look for it and get photos myself, but chances are someone else here
            will probably get an opportunity to drive by it before I would.
          • Albert LaFrance
            So the construction people were Long Lines employees, rather than contractors? That s really interesting - very different from today! Do you recall the
            Message 5 of 29 , Jul 1 8:44 PM
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              So the construction people were Long Lines employees, rather than
              contractors? That's really interesting - very different from today! Do you
              recall the approximate timeframe when that was the case?

              Albert

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "ozob99" <ozob99@...>
              To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 12:26 PM
              Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Remote Radio


              > That could have been the Long Lines construction gangs' vehicles;they
              > may have had their own frequencies(their function was not telephone
              > maintenance but laying cable & MW tower construction)) as well as
              > channels to talk with the pipeline contractors & others.
              >
              > These guys were a different breed of telephone men;constantly
              > traveling all over the country,many with their house trailers in tow.
            • David Lesher
              ... The inspectors & engineers will surely be employees. The digging crew, might be but... -- A host is a host from coast to
              Message 6 of 29 , Jul 1 9:00 PM
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                Unnamed Administration sources reported that Albert LaFrance said:
                >
                > So the construction people were Long Lines employees, rather than
                > contractors? That's really interesting - very different from today! Do you
                > recall the approximate timeframe when that was the case?
                >
                > Albert
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "ozob99" <ozob99@...>
                > To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 12:26 PM
                > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Remote Radio
                >
                >
                > > That could have been the Long Lines construction gangs' vehicles;they
                > > may have had their own frequencies(their function was not telephone
                > > maintenance but laying cable & MW tower construction)) as well as
                > > channels to talk with the pipeline contractors & others.
                > >
                > > These guys were a different breed of telephone men;constantly
                > > traveling all over the country,many with their house trailers in tow.


                The inspectors & engineers will surely be employees.

                The digging crew, might be but...




                --
                A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
                & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
                Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
                is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
              • ozob99
                ... today! Do you ... The gangs were mainly splicers,& supervised/coordinated the work of the contract excavators,riggers,etc; up through 1980 or so; i m
                Message 7 of 29 , Jul 2 5:29 AM
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                  --- In coldwarcomms@y..., "Albert LaFrance" <albertjlafrance@c...>
                  wrote:
                  > So the construction people were Long Lines employees, rather than
                  > contractors? That's really interesting - very different from
                  today! Do you
                  > recall the approximate timeframe when that was the case?
                  >
                  > Albert



                  The "gangs" were mainly splicers,& supervised/coordinated the work of
                  the contract excavators,riggers,etc; up through 1980 or so; i'm not
                  sure if they still exsist today or whether its all contract work.




                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "ozob99" <ozob99@y...>
                  > To: <coldwarcomms@y...>
                  > Sent: Monday, July 01, 2002 12:26 PM
                  > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Remote Radio
                  >
                  >
                  > > That could have been the Long Lines construction gangs'
                  vehicles;they
                  > > may have had their own frequencies(their function was not
                  telephone
                  > > maintenance but laying cable & MW tower construction)) as well as
                  > > channels to talk with the pipeline contractors & others.
                  > >
                  > > These guys were a different breed of telephone men;constantly
                  > > traveling all over the country,many with their house trailers in
                  tow.
                • Albert LaFrance
                  ... From: ozob99 To: Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 8:29 AM Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Remote Radio ... My
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jul 2 2:25 PM
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                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "ozob99" <ozob99@...>
                    To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 8:29 AM
                    Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Remote Radio


                    > The "gangs" were mainly splicers,& supervised/coordinated the work of
                    > the contract excavators,riggers,etc; up through 1980 or so; i'm not
                    > sure if they still exsist today or whether its all contract work.

                    My impression is that a lot more work is done by contractors today, but not
                    being in the industry so I don't know for sure. I have seen AT&T
                    fiber-splicing vans, but they may just be for emergencies and "odd jobs". I
                    think a lot of utilities - not only telecom but gas, electric, etc. - use
                    contractors for major construction and other elective work that can be
                    scheduled in advance, saving their own crews for time-sensitive and smaller
                    projects.

                    Also, today's competitive telecom environment probably helped make
                    specialized contracting a viable business. In the Bell System era, I
                    imagine there wasn't a lot of demand for L-coax installation skills outside
                    the phone company. But today, fiber is being installed everywhere, by many
                    companies for multiple networks - at least until recently :)

                    Albert
                  • ozob99
                    ... JL/YL ... the ... or ... long ... I found the brand,in case any are interested: Raven Electronics, still in business.
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jul 3 4:25 AM
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                      --- In coldwarcomms@y..., "ozob99" <ozob99@y...> wrote:
                      > --- In coldwarcomms@y..., Ken Hoehn <khoehn@i...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Interestingly before ,or just as TMRS was available, the old VHF
                      JL/YL
                      > mobile phones were used for comms in the field & now cellular has
                      > superceded TMRS...full circle.
                      >
                      > Do you recall the commercial interface/control panel brand used at
                      the
                      > CO's & terminals?..i recall it was the name of an animal or flower
                      or
                      > such( a small company)..searched for the name but i suspect its
                      long
                      > gone or was bought out by a big name mfg.



                      I found the brand,in case any are interested: Raven Electronics,
                      still in business. http://www.ravencomm.com/html_site/orderwire.asp






                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Albert LaFrance
                      Today I located another marker which might be on the original DC-Baltimore coax route. It s at the intersection of US-29 (Colesville Rd.) and Southwood Ave.
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jul 7 4:39 PM
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                        Today I located another marker which might be on the original DC-Baltimore
                        coax route. It's at the intersection of US-29 (Colesville Rd.) and
                        Southwood Ave. in Montgomery County, MD, about 0.8 mile outside I-495 (the
                        Capital Beltway).

                        Like the Laurel, MD marker, this one is an old-looking 4x4 wood post about 4
                        ft. tall. It's painted white and is numbered 146 with large aluminum
                        numerals. The warning sign is metal, rather than the reflective laminated
                        plastic/fiberglass at Laurel, which makes me think it's older. It has the
                        modern (1969-era?) Bell System logo - a simple outline of a bell inside a
                        circle, blue on a white backgound - and says "Transcontinental Coaxial Cable
                        Route". The only phone number given is a local Miss Utility locating
                        service number - not the organization's 800 number or a direct AT&T number
                        as on the Laurel marker.

                        This marker is about 9 miles north of AT&T's Washington 1 office, and about
                        11 miles southwest of the Laurel marker. Assuming the two markers are on
                        the same route and are numbered sequentially, the difference between the two
                        works out to about 11 markers per airline mile, which seems reasonable.

                        Given the scarcity of markers along likely DC-Baltimore coax routes, I'll
                        probably have to look into official records like highway right-of-way use
                        agreements. I may also try calling the Monrovia CAPAR number and asking if
                        they have any *really* old cable records.

                        Albert
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