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Re: Unusual antenna

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  • Tom Norris
    ... You just answered your own question. :-) Used to have a 4 bay version of this same antenna on an FM station I used to service several years ago. Forget who
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 1, 1999
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      At 01:03 AM 07/01/1999 -0400, you wrote:
      >A year ot two later, this antenna was replaced by what looks like a
      >conventional FM transmit antenna; i.e. several sets of square horizontal
      >hoops attached to a vertical pole. This new antenna uses the same feedline
      >as the banana device.
      >
      >Any idea what this thing was? I've never seen anything similar.

      You just answered your own question. :-) Used to have a 4 bay version of
      this same antenna on an FM station I used to service several years ago.
      Forget who made the thing.
    • Albert LaFrance
      Tom, Thanks for the reply. BTW, I looked at the replacement antenna today; it s a 2-bay model. Are the bananas the actual radiating elements, or are they
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 1, 1999
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        Tom,

        Thanks for the reply. BTW, I looked at the replacement antenna today; it's
        a 2-bay model.

        Are the "bananas" the actual radiating elements, or are they radomes
        covering the elements? Do you know what the advantages/drawbacks are of
        this design vs. the more commonly-used antennas?

        ...Albert

        >You just answered your own question. :-) Used to have a 4 bay version of
        >this same antenna on an FM station I used to service several years ago.
        >Forget who made the thing.
      • Albert LaFrance
        Tim, ... broadcasting ... Thanks for the info - I d appreciate any manufacturers URLs you can find. I looked at the Dielectric and Shively websites, but
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 1, 1999
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          Tim,

          > Yep, it was an FM broadcast antenna, known in the industry as a
          >'rototiller' style. Several companies manufacture them.
          >
          > I see ads for them all the time in one of the commercial
          broadcasting
          >magazines I subscribe to. I'll pay better attention to the ads next time,

          >and hurl related URLs on to Albert.

          Thanks for the info - I'd appreciate any manufacturers' URLs you can find.
          I looked at the Dielectric and Shively websites, but didn't see any
          rototillers. They seem to be far less common, at least around here, than
          the multi-bay "horizontal-ring" type of antenna.

          > But Albert's post DOES remind me of something Cold War related!
          >About 13 years ago I spent a good amount of time in the DC area, and can
          >remember one day driving around the the Silver Hill area, and coming
          across
          >what looked like a big old RADAR platform or helicopter landing pad,
          elevated
          >up my steel lattice work about 30' above the ground.
          >
          > I seem to recall it was VERY close to a large National Archives
          >building. It was ringed with some antennas along the edge of it,
          inclusding
          >some which at the time looked pretty funky -- similar to the rototiller
          >blade antennas that Albert noticed. I later found them in an antenna
          catalog
          >(D&M, I think), and it turns out they were 118-136MHz cross-polarized
          >antennas.
          >
          > So I'm assuming now that the site I'd seen was just simply an FAA
          >transmit site, but I'd never seen one on that type of tower setup.
          >
          >Maybe one of you local boys can go take a look, or are already
          >familiar with it. BIggest clue to the location would be the National
          >Archives facility, as I seem to recall this big transmit site was
          basically
          >on the front lawn of the NA property.

          Interesting - I'll check it out. My map book shows two federal properties
          in the area. North of the Suitland Parkway, there's the big Suitland
          Federal Center (some of the tenants are the Census Bureau, Naval
          Intelligence, and NOAA, I think). This is the place with the huge water
          tower in front.

          South of the parkway, there's a smaller parcel housing the Smithsonian
          Support Center and the NationaI Air and Space Museum's Paul E. Garber
          restoration facility. The former STRATCOM tower is near the eastern end of
          this property.

          ...Albert
        • CLDWARHIST@xxx.xxx
          In a message dated 7/2/99 1:07:58 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ALaFrance@compuserve.com writes:
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 1, 1999
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            In a message dated 7/2/99 1:07:58 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            ALaFrance@... writes:

            << South of the parkway, there's a smaller parcel housing the Smithsonian
            Support Center and the NationaI Air and Space Museum's Paul E. Garber
            restoration facility. The former STRATCOM tower is near the eastern end of
            this property. >>
            Is this Broad Run Radio Station??? Also do you have any pictures Albert of
            the tower?
            George
          • Hooligan@xxx.xxx
            In a message dated 7/2/99 1:08:05 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... I ve spent lots of time in Suitland -- awesome place, with some incredibly significant things
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 2, 1999
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              In a message dated 7/2/99 1:08:05 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
              ALaFrance@... writes:

              > Interesting - I'll check it out. My map book shows two federal properties
              > in the area. North of the Suitland Parkway, there's the big Suitland
              > Federal Center (some of the tenants are the Census Bureau, Naval
              > Intelligence, and NOAA, I think). This is the place with the huge water
              > tower in front.

              I've spent lots of time in Suitland -- awesome place, with some incredibly
              significant things being done in there over the decades.

              But the ground-air transceive site wasn't at SFC.


              Tim
            • Albert LaFrance
              George, No, it s not Broad Run - that was in northern VA. I believe Broad Run was the facility that is now the National Weather Service station near Dulles
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 2, 1999
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                George,

                No, it's not Broad Run - that was in northern VA. I believe Broad Run was
                the facility that is now the National Weather Service station near Dulles
                Airport.

                I'll try to get some pictures of the Silver Hill tower and will post them.

                ...Albert

                Message text written by INTERNET:coldwarcomms@onelist.com
                >Is this Broad Run Radio Station??? Also do you have any pictures Albert
                of
                >the tower?
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