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Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T government circuits list

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  • blitz
    Interesting, as I expected, the circuit thing could also be a non-communications related as well then, as in the missile firing circuit, the lighting
    Message 1 of 30 , Feb 23, 2002
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      Interesting, as I expected, the "circuit" thing could also be a
      non-communications related as well then, as in the missile firing circuit,
      the lighting circuit, etc.
      The definition isn't so easy then, as it varies if youre in communications,
      an electrician, or other area that uses an electrical connection between
      one place and another...



      At 14:12 2/23/02 -0500, you wrote:
      >Here's yet another angle on the terminology question.
      >
      >A fellow list member kindly looked up the official DoD definitions of
      >"circuit". In definition (1), it's interesting that the authors clearly
      >wanted to associate the term with a specific layer in a communications
      >hierarchy.
      >
      >circuit (D0D)
      >1. An electronic path between two or more points, capable of providing a
      >number of channels.
      >2. A number of conductors connected together for the purpose of carrying
      >an electrical circuit.
      >
      >from: "Department of Defense Dictionary of
      >Military and Associated Terms" (JOINT PUB 1-02 of l Dec. 1989, formerly
      >JCS PUB 1).
      >
      >It looks as though "circuit" is one of those words which turn out to have
      >significantly different meanings to people in various sectors of the
      >communications field. "Channel" and "broadband" are others which come to
      >mind.
      >
      >Albert
      >
      >----- Original Message -----
      >From: "blitz" <blitz@...>
      >To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
      >Sent: Sunday, January 20, 2002 5:55 PM
      >Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T government circuits list
      >
      >
      > > I was always under the impression a "circuit" was a nailed up path. While
      >a
      > > line implied switchability....
      > > Thus the "Cleveland-Boston" circuit, and the customer "line"..
      > > Guess different shops used different vernacular...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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