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High Voltage atop a Microwave Tower?

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  • ozob99
    http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1873&dat=19800225&id=CP8hAAAAIBAJ&sjid=QdMEAAAAIBAJ&pg=910,4603619 See last sentence; scare tactic I suppose, unless
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 25, 2014
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      http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1873&dat=19800225&id=CP8hAAAAIBAJ&sjid=QdMEAAAAIBAJ&pg=910,4603619

      See last sentence; scare tactic I suppose, unless something special was up there.
    • frnortner
      There are a lot of cell sites mounted on powerline transmission towers.I think around the Dallas area they are T-Mobile. I ve seen them built using a
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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        There are a lot of cell sites mounted on powerline transmission towers.I think around the Dallas area they are T-Mobile. I've seen them built using a helicopter pick with the lines energized, and sometimes crane hoisted if they can de energize the lines. THey are usually on single or dual 66 or 132 KV lines.
        But I would think the newpaper would have mentioned that it was a power transmission line.Although, considering their usual talent for getting technical facts wrong, it was probably a clothesline.
        -- Doc


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      • David
        ... Agreed but that s a far cry from the 12KV level. I dismissed the whole story as BS.
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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          On 7/26/14 12:16 PM, frnortner@... [coldwarcomms] wrote:

          > There are a lot of cell sites mounted on powerline transmission towers.I
          > think around the Dallas area they are T-Mobile. I've seen them built
          > using a helicopter pick with the lines energized, and sometimes crane
          > hoisted if they can de energize the lines. THey are usually on single or
          > dual 66 or 132 KV lines.



          Agreed but that's a far cry from the 12KV level. I dismissed the whole
          story as BS.
        • wn9meu
          Good afternoon all ------------ yes, I too thought it was either a misquote or an intentional attempt at wow by the PR person. The only possibility I ve been
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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            Good afternoon all ------------ yes, I too thought it was either a
            misquote or an intentional attempt at "wow" by the PR person. The only
            possibility I've been able to justify is that the PR person "might" have
            been referring to the firing voltage of the top strobe beacon. A
            stretch?

            Tim Fox

            On 2014-07-26 11:23, David wb8foz@... [coldwarcomms] wrote:

            > On 7/26/14 12:16 PM, frnortner@... [coldwarcomms] wrote:
            >
            >> There are a lot of cell sites mounted on powerline transmission towers.I think around the Dallas area they are T-Mobile. I've seen them built using a helicopter pick with the lines energized, and sometimes crane hoisted if they can de energize the lines. THey are usually on single or dual 66 or 132 KV lines.
            >
            > Agreed but that's a far cry from the 12KV level. I dismissed the whole
            > story as BS.
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            > Posted by: David <wb8foz@...>
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo Groups Links
            >
            >
            >

            Links:
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            [1] http://groups.yahoo.com/group/coldwarcomms/
            [2] http://groups.yahoo.com/group/coldwarcomms/join
            [3] https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/


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          • David
            ... The PR person likely does not grok the strobes use electricity......
            Message 5 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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              On 7/26/14 4:18 PM, tdfox@... [coldwarcomms] wrote:


              > Good afternoon all ------------ yes, I too thought it was either a
              > misquote or an intentional attempt at "wow" by the PR person. The only
              > possibility I've been able to justify is that the PR person "might" have
              > been referring to the firing voltage of the top strobe beacon. A
              > stretch?
              >

              The PR person likely does not grok the strobes use electricity......
            • Robert Getsla
              I had a strobe on top of a TV transmitting tower.  The average voltage was 350 volts DC, but there was a pulse (which AC coupled into a step-up transformer
              Message 6 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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                I had a strobe on top of a TV transmitting tower.  The average voltage was 350 volts DC, but there was a pulse (which AC coupled into a step-up transformer for triggering the strobe) superimposed on the DC.  As I recall, the pulse was a single negative going pulse to ground, one every 1.5 seconds.  That was capacitively coupled into the trigger transformer.  But the trigger transformer was enclosed in the lamp housing.  That was the "Day" mode.

                The "Night" mode was a series of pulses (again, about 350 volts) but the energy storage caps (at the base of the tower) used in "Night" mode were much smaller, and the trigger pulses were in a cluster (20 of them, one for every other cycle of the power line,) to simulate a white light blinking instead of a bright flash.

                The trigger transformer probably did put out several kilovolts on the pulse, but I never measured it.


                Bob Getsla aka LinearBob    WA6WHT  (my amateur radio call letters)
                Transmitter engineer for KTSF-TV26 and KTSF-DT27, San Francisco, CA  (1 day per week)
                Analog, RF, and Network engineer for WattMinder, Sunnyvale, CA
                Linux evangelist
                Inventor


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Albert LaFrance
                Sort of OT, but for me, nothing beats the aesthetics of a tower with the classic red-orange and white paint bands, a red flashing incandescent top beacon and
                Message 7 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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                  Sort of OT, but for me, nothing beats the aesthetics of a tower with the
                  classic red-orange and white paint bands, a red flashing incandescent top
                  beacon and side lights!



                  Albert



                  From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com]
                  Sent: Saturday, July 26, 2014 5:18 PM
                  To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: High Voltage atop a Microwave Tower?





                  I had a strobe on top of a TV transmitting tower. The average voltage was
                  350 volts DC, but there was a pulse (which AC coupled into a step-up
                  transformer for triggering the strobe) superimposed on the DC. As I recall,
                  the pulse was a single negative going pulse to ground, one every 1.5
                  seconds. That was capacitively coupled into the trigger transformer. But
                  the trigger transformer was enclosed in the lamp housing. That was the
                  "Day" mode.

                  The "Night" mode was a series of pulses (again, about 350 volts) but the
                  energy storage caps (at the base of the tower) used in "Night" mode were
                  much smaller, and the trigger pulses were in a cluster (20 of them, one for
                  every other cycle of the power line,) to simulate a white light blinking
                  instead of a bright flash.

                  The trigger transformer probably did put out several kilovolts on the pulse,
                  but I never measured it.

                  Bob Getsla aka LinearBob WA6WHT (my amateur radio call letters)
                  Transmitter engineer for KTSF-TV26 and KTSF-DT27, San Francisco, CA (1 day
                  per week)
                  Analog, RF, and Network engineer for WattMinder, Sunnyvale, CA
                  Linux evangelist
                  Inventor

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • David
                  On 7/26/14 5:27 PM, Albert LaFrance albert.lafrance@coldwar-c4i.net ... The FAA at one point allowed tower owners to not paint & use daytime strobes. ($$$$
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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                    On 7/26/14 5:27 PM, 'Albert LaFrance' albert.lafrance@...
                    [coldwarcomms] wrote:

                    > Sort of OT, but for me, nothing beats the aesthetics of a tower with the
                    > classic red-orange and white paint bands, a red flashing incandescent top
                    > beacon and side lights!


                    The FAA at one point allowed tower owners to not paint & use daytime
                    strobes. ($$$$ issue for the tower owners...)

                    Subsequent studies showed they were less visible than striped towers, but I
                    don't know if they reverted the rule back.
                  • Robert Getsla
                    The latest beacons are LED arrays, and most of them are red, although I have seen some white LED strobes.  Sutro tower has a combination of paint and red
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jul 26, 2014
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                      The latest beacons are LED arrays, and most of them are red, although I have seen some white LED strobes.  Sutro tower has a combination of paint and red LEDs, except for the very top, where there are white strobes in the daytime, and red beacons at night. The Sutro strobes could be xenon flash lamps or they could be LEDs.  My guess is they have pulsed white LEDs because the LED array would have a longer potential life and a less catastrophic failure mode.  Climbing to the tops of their 3 masts would require all of the stations there to switch to their auxiliary antennas, and I am sure they want to avoid that as much as possible, since the aux antennas are only 1/3 of the way up the tower, and would greatly reduce their coverage.  But no one wants to cook any tower climbers, either.   So I think they went with LED arrays.

                       
                      Bob Getsla aka LinearBob    WA6WHT  (my amateur radio call letters)
                      Transmitter engineer for KTSF-TV26 and KTSF-DT27, San Francisco, CA  (1 day per week)
                      Analog, RF, and Network engineer for WattMinder, Sunnyvale, CA
                      Linux evangelist
                      Inventor



                      On Saturday, July 26, 2014 2:35 PM, "David wb8foz@... [coldwarcomms]" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



                       
                      On 7/26/14 5:27 PM, 'Albert LaFrance' albert.lafrance@...
                      [coldwarcomms] wrote:

                      > Sort of OT, but for me, nothing beats the aesthetics of a tower with the
                      > classic red-orange and white paint bands, a red flashing incandescent top
                      > beacon and side lights!

                      The FAA at one point allowed tower owners to not paint & use daytime
                      strobes. ($$$$ issue for the tower owners...)

                      Subsequent studies showed they were less visible than striped towers, but I
                      don't know if they reverted the rule back.




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • f r nortner
                      Har. That thought about the firing voltage on the strobe actually crossed my mind. Like the famous sign DANGER! 12,000 MILLIVOLTS . [Non-text portions of this
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jul 27, 2014
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                        Har. That thought about the firing voltage on the strobe actually crossed my mind. Like the famous sign "DANGER! 12,000 MILLIVOLTS".

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • blitz716
                        Due to the FUD factor I see, DANGER! 100,000,000 Ohms. (grin)12kv my arse, I climbed these things for 20 years. :-P ... [Non-text portions of this message have
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jul 27, 2014
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                          Due to the FUD factor I see, DANGER! 100,000,000 Ohms. (grin)12kv my
                          arse, I climbed these things for 20 years. :-P

                          f r nortner frnortner@... [coldwarcomms] wrote:
                          > Har. That thought about the firing voltage on the strobe actually crossed my mind. Like the famous sign "DANGER! 12,000 MILLIVOLTS".
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          > Posted by: f r nortner <frnortner@...>
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Yahoo Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >


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                        • Joe
                          I ve worked for several paging and cellular companies in the past 25 years here in the New England area. Several sites had Danger, High Voltage! signs
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jul 27, 2014
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                            I've worked for several paging and cellular companies in the past 25
                            years here in the New England area. Several sites had "Danger, High
                            Voltage!" signs attached to the site fence or tower itself. These sites
                            were typically privately owned and not owned by one of the large tower
                            conglomerates. I think the site owner posted the sign just to keep
                            people away from the site and had no bearing on what was really on the
                            tower. A scare technique at best.

                            Also, High Voltage signs are much easier to buy at the local electrical
                            supplier that RF Radiation warning signs.

                            Joe
                          • ozob99
                            Such as these 1955 models: http://vintageadsandbooks.com/images/p/p015.jpg
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jul 28, 2014
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                            • smw0203
                              A lot of the older Long Lines Towers had KG-225 Strobes on top of the tower, all Xenon Tower Strobes pull 500VDC. 20,000 Candela in the day and 2,000 at night.
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 3, 2014
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                                A lot of the older Long Lines Towers had KG-225 Strobes on top of the tower, all Xenon Tower Strobes pull 500VDC. 20,000 Candela in the day and 2,000 at night.


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