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RAINFORM RED

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  • O ZOB
    Is a term new to me,RAINFORM ;seems to be Navy-Wide Formatted Message Reporting System (RAINFORM) ; I assume RED is the highest of the color priorities.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 29, 2014
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      Is a term new to me,RAINFORM ;seems to be "Navy-Wide Formatted Message Reporting System (RAINFORM)"; I assume RED is the highest of the color priorities.

      Snippet from:

      Hostile Waters: The Death of Soviet Submarine K219



      "In Norfolk, a teletype began to chatter noisily in the heavily guarded
      headquarters of the Atlantic submarine fleet; an inner sanctum even
      the regular Navy could not easily visit. The message read:


      FLASH/CRITIC
      SECRET CRITIC
      RAINFORM RED
      BT
      AAA//RED TWO
      BBB// 30-43 N
      CCC// 54-27 W
      ODD// 030338Z OCT86
      EEE// CONTACT SUFFERED MAJOR UNEXPLAINED
      EXPLOSION. CONTACT ON SURFACE FIGHTING
      FIRES AND FLOODING. AM STANDING CLEAR
      OF CRITICAL ZONE PENDING FURTHER
      ORDERS. UNODIR WILL MAINTAIN COVERT
      SURVEILLANCE—CAESAR"

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ozob99
      A list member sent me more info on RAINFORM messages and the transmission schemes/links used; RAINFORM has been around since 1985, possibly earlier:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 30, 2014
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      • wftroskey
        Here s what I got from a couple of guys on the CommCenter1 Group: I m not a Navy guy. We received several RAINFORM RED and RAINFORM BLUE messages daily at the
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 1, 2014
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          Here's what I got from a couple of guys on the CommCenter1 Group:


          I'm not a Navy guy.

          We received several RAINFORM RED and RAINFORM BLUE messages daily
          at the NATO communications
          center in Naples, Italy. These are ship disposition messages.
          The Red version is enemy and unknown ships,
          and the Blue is friendly or Allied ships.

          We had Italian military on shift/watch. When NOFORN (No Foreign
          National) messages were received at
          the Olivetti teletypes the Italians would tear off and hold
          aloft, announcing NOFORN. The American trick
          or watch chief would take the message and deliver to the command
          center.

          Terry

          -----and----


          Well, UNODIR is strictly a Navy term, meaning "Unless Otherwise Directed".

          Saw this a lot when I worked at the Army CC at Key West, FL (RUCLKWA),
          and at the Navy Front Street CommCenter, Naval Station, Key West (RUTW)
          on Navy message traffic. As I was Army, the Army never used this acronym,
          but we had to learn the Navy ways......also seen on Navy RUTWSGG and
          RUTWSKA traffic. (SGG was the terminal station of RUTW; SKA was
          Boca Chica Naval Air Station (Key West area) in the early 70s when I
          was there.

          UNODIR dates back to WW II...so its' an oldie!.

          Dave
          DE RUMLNHA



          Bill




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ozob99
          ... LL also used the term trick for hours of duty(AKA tours); shift was rarely used. In later years one had to be careful about asking a female tech about
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 1, 2014
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            >The American trick or watch chief would take the message and deliver to the command
            >center.


            LL also used the term "trick" for hours of duty(AKA tours); shift was rarely used.


            In later years one had to be careful about asking a female tech about working the evening or night trick.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Tim
            This probably explains why the callword for the WH Comms Agency Duty Officer was TRICK CHIEF. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 3, 2014
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              This probably explains why the callword for the WH Comms Agency Duty
              Officer was
              TRICK CHIEF.


              On 7/1/2014 10:56 AM, ozob99@... [coldwarcomms] wrote:
              >
              > >The American trick or watch chief would take the message and deliver
              > to the command
              > >center.
              >
              >
              > LL also used the term "trick" for hours of duty(AKA tours); shift was
              > rarely used.
              >
              >
              > In later years one had to be careful about asking a female tech about
              > working the evening or night trick.
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • ozob99
              ... Since 1981 according to this report: Sneaking subs into waters off the west coast — its happened before By Wayne Madsen The firing of a
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 16, 2014
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                >>A list member sent me more info on RAINFORM messages and the transmission schemes/links >>used; RAINFORM has been around since 1985, possibly earlier:

                Since 1981 according to this report:




                "Sneaking subs into waters off the west coast — its happened before

                By Wayne Madsen

                The firing of a submarine-launched ballistic missile by a Chinese Jin-class submarine off the coast of southern California last Monday at the height of evening rush hour in Los Angeles was not the first time the U.S. Navy's anti-submarine warfare sensors in the Pacific have failed.

                In 1981, a Soviet Victor-class nuclear submarine successfully evaded the Navy's Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) network of underwater hydrophones, Towed Array Sensor System (TASS) ships, and P-3 sonobuoy-equipped aircraft and popped up off the Oregon coast alongside a Soviet fishing fishing trawler.

                While serving as the Operations Officer at the Navy's SOSUS station at Coos Head, Oregon, this editor received a phone call from the Coast Guard station in Brookings, Oregon reporting that some local fishermen sighted a Soviet submarine alongside a fishing trawler flying the Soviet flag some 30 miles off Brookings.

                The incident resulted in the sending of a "Bravo" visual sighting on a Navy-Wide Formatted Message Reporting System (RAINFORM) message to the Commander Oceanographic System Pacific (COMOCEANSYSPAC) in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Since the clear majority of Soviet submarine contact reports were SOSUS RED messages, meaning they submarine had been detected by the SOSUS acoustic arrays, the sending of a BRAVO visual sighting message to the Navy's top commands in Pearl Harbor created a political storm.

                The Navy's higher-ups immediately began to question the veracity of the Oregon fishermen and the Coast Guard in an effort to limit the damage. The reaction by the Navy was similar to the cover story now being issued by the Pentagon that the missile plume witnessed some 35 miles off the California coast was actually from a US Airways flight from Honolulu to Phoenix, a model rocket, or an optical illusion.

                In 1981, a Victor-III Soviet nuclear attack submarine, armed with torpedos and anti-ship missiles, popped up previously undetected some 30 miles off the Oregon coast. The submarine had undergone significant noise-reduction modifications, with its turbine and propeller cavitation being quieted to avoid detection by U.S. Navy acoustic sensors in the Pacific. The Navy, embarrassed, covered up the incident.

                The Navy, clearly embarrassed over the undetected presence of a Chinese Jin-class SSBN submarine off the coast of Los Angeles, is, some 40 years after the Victor-III incident, continuing its age-old tradition of covering up when it screws up. Aiding and abetting the Pentagon are a group of recently-minted "experts" from NASA, the Discovery Channel Rupert Murdoch's array of claptrap publications, Pentagon-funded web sites and think tanks, and other "usual suspects" in the conspiracy theory proffering business.

                The Pentagon, shown to have wasted billions of dollars on a useless ballistic missile defense system, is working overtime with the media and on the Internet to cover up the latest debacle. However, even some reporters who cover the Pentagon full-time are beginning to question the Pentagon's version of events last Monday night over the skies west of Los Angeles.

                Wayne Madsen is a Washington, DC-based investigative journalist, author and syndicated columnist. "
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