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Massachusetts L cable

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  • ozob99
    Following a Cold War trail of top secret communications technology and bunkers across Berkshire County http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_13510866
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 28, 2013
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      "Following a Cold War trail of top secret communications technology and bunkers across Berkshire County"


      http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_13510866



    • David
      ... Quote: // Bill Edwards and I explored remote sections of two hill towns together and found one white building (mustn t say where) with the metal door off,
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 28, 2013
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        On 9/28/13 9:40 AM, ozob99@... wrote:

        > http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_13510866


        Quote:
        //
        Bill Edwards and I explored remote sections of two hill towns together and
        found one white building (mustn't say where) with the metal door off, lying
        on the ground. Inside, we found that a typical manhole had three layers of
        lids: a 2-inch steel cover -- it must have weighed 300 lbs. -- raised by a
        chainfall attached to a track mounted on the building's ceiling; a second,
        1-inch steel cover, half the weight of the other one, raised in similar
        manner; and a third, plug-shaped cover with a thick lead shield. The whole
        below-ground room was air-tight. It was lead-shielded to protect it from
        gamma rays.
        \\

        I've not seen mention of this multiple lid scheme before. Was it really a
        L4 repeater vault?
      • Bill Luebkemann
        Great read, thanks for sharing! Bill L.
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 28, 2013
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          Great read, thanks for sharing!

          Bill L.




          On Sep 28, 2013, at 9:40 AM, <ozob99@...> wrote:

           

          "Following a Cold War trail of top secret communications technology and bunkers across Berkshire County"





        • Pj
          For what it s worth, the northern line that runs near or through the Peru MW site still has various huts that have been repurposed into storage sheds. IIRC the
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 28, 2013
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            For what it's worth, the northern line that runs near or through the Peru MW site still has various huts that have been repurposed into storage sheds. IIRC the roof painted markers were still viable on several if them.

            Another factoid, my former chief fire engineer was an AT&T manager attached to the Springfield toll office and had other assignments. Before I really knew to ask him questions before I became interested in this he stated that when they were building chesterfield that the contractor staged so much stuff on a floor corner that the entire floor (mounted on springs) lifted up and raised it above the entry way.

            Took them a bit to mive it back down so a couple if guys can get out and to level it out.
          • wwuh1
            Historic and contemporary photos of the Chesterfield, MA UG: http://coldwar-ma.com/ATT_Chesterfield.html ---In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com,
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 29, 2013
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              Historic and contemporary photos of the Chesterfield, MA UG:

              http://coldwar-ma.com/ATT_Chesterfield.html 



              ---In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

              "Following a Cold War trail of top secret communications technology and bunkers across Berkshire County"

              http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_13510866



            • David
              ... Is that one of the infamous spring-loaded air valves?
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 29, 2013
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                On 9/29/13 10:41 AM, ramsey@... wrote:
                >
                > Historic and contemporary photos of the Chesterfield, MA UG:
                >
                > http://coldwar-ma.com/ATT_Chesterfield.html
                >

                <http://coldwar-ma.com/images/f439dadbc330746615d17cea5fb1fa80.jpg>

                Is that one of the infamous spring-loaded air valves?
              • David
                When paying your POCO bill this month, take a look at Chesterfield s wattmeter. Assuming
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 29, 2013
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                  <http://coldwar-ma.com/images/8ef078a04913aea3c207a4bd6bd9d267.jpg>

                  When paying your POCO bill this month, take a look at Chesterfield's
                  wattmeter. Assuming norm is ~60% full scale, that's 400 KW.

                  Now, just SWAG in say 10c/KWH, and 24H/day, 30 days/month....

                  [Yes, Ma did not pay retail pricing, but....]
                • ozob99
                  Another somewhat redundant article:
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 29, 2013
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                    Another somewhat redundant article:



                    http://www.tcextra.com/news/publish/regionalnews/Roadside_archaeology_Stalking_Cold_War_transcontinental_telephone_coaxial_lines_from_the_1960s_Why_are_those_cables_buried_beneath_the_Northwest_Corner/939100.shtml



                    Chesterfield is mentioned in this article on "Nuclear-Safe Subway line":



                    http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1144&dat=19671203&id=za0pAAAAIBAJ&sjid=ok8EAAAAIBAJ&pg=7188,650463




                    ---In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    "Following a Cold War trail of top secret communications technology and bunkers across Berkshire County"

                    http://www.berkshireeagle.com/ci_13510866



                  • David
                    On 9/29/13 1:59 PM, ozob99@yahoo.com wrote:
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 29, 2013
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                      On 9/29/13 1:59 PM, ozob99@... wrote:

                      <http://www.tcextra.com/news/publish/regionalnews/Roadside_archaeology_Stalking_Cold_War_transcontinental_telephone_coaxial_lines_from_the_1960s_Why_are_those_cables_buried_beneath_the_Northwest_Corner/939100.shtml>


                      "The general pattern was alternating buildings (which house below-ground
                      repeater equipment) and bunkers every 2 miles. The bunkers are to protect
                      splices. The rugged coaxial cables came in huge reels — 2 miles worth on each."


                      Err, wasn't Coax20 limited to less than 1750 ft on a reel?

                      And what's with huts every 4 miles? I thought the hive mind conclusion was
                      that equalizing repeaters, with the far bigger vaults, might have had huts;
                      but not lesser ones.
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