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RE: [coldwarcomms] NAWAS was Re: Nationwide Emergency Telecommunications Service(NETS)

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  • Mike Cowen
    That brings up memories... The first time I heard the female voice in DEN say tonight so passionately, I was ready for a cold shower. ... PHX, we have the
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 19, 2013
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      That brings up memories... The first time I heard the female voice
      in DEN say "tonight" so passionately, I was ready for a cold shower.
      :-) It was just that one word that sounded SO real. Sadly, here in
      PHX, we have the male voice which suffers no such realism...

      Mike


      At 08:19 AM 7/19/2013, you wrote:
      >
      >Each NWS office has a computer-based speech generator which converts alerts
      >and forecasts into speech... [snip]
      >
      >John

      ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Mike Cowen Practice random acts of kindness
      and selfless acts of beauty.
      mcowen@... -Anonymous
    • wftroskey
      The Model 207 is the one we had in our dispatch center for many years prior to us moving to another city. Before that, it was a plain black handset with a PTT
      Message 2 of 16 , Jul 20, 2013
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        The Model 207 is the one we had in our dispatch center for many years prior to us moving to another city.

        Before that, it was a plain black handset with a PTT button in the handgrip, connected to a 4" x 2" box on the wall with a cradle-style hookswitch sticking out of it.

        I kinda miss having that.

        I seem to recall coming across a "users manual" of sorts 25-or-so years ago; thought it might have included a simplified diagram of how it all worked, including the 4w-4w bridges. That document (as well as any vivid memory I may have had of it) is long gone.


        Bill



        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "John K Scoggin, Jr" <aat3bf@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here's a website with info from the manufacturer of the NAWAS instruments:
        > http://comlabs.com/4-wire-systems-overview
        >
        >
        >
        > john
        >
        >
        >
        > From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
        > Behalf Of Kevin Anderson, K9IUA
        > Sent: Friday, July 19, 2013 8:33 AM
        > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [coldwarcomms] NAWAS was Re: Nationwide Emergency
        > Telecommunications Service(NETS)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > So, are you saying that dedicated physical point-to-point wire exists
        > everywhere to implement NAWAS? Or is it accomplished by dedicated circuits
        > that were always connected entries in the old analog trunk groups and today
        > are reserved bits, slots, or packets in T1, OC-3, OC-48, etc., traffic over
        > fiber?
        >
        > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
        > , "OZOB99" <ozob99@> wrote:
        > >
        > > As you know, NAWAS was a warning system connecting state/local CD
        > locations with federal entities; it used dedicated multipoint 4W private
        > line circuits (GP4285-nn et al) within regions, and had interconnecting
        > capability nationwide with all regions; the only PSN connection may have
        > been dialup back up between certain locations.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com> , "Kevin Anderson, K9IUA" <k9iua@>
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > How does NAWAS (National Warning System) fit into any of this? This is
        > non-switched hierarchial "party-line" system, which uses specialized phones
        > at each site. Some 2200+ nodes exist. It predates NETS, but has been
        > apparently carried to the present. While GETS is switched through the phone
        > system, I'd love to know whether NAWAS actually goes through the PSN network
        > as dedicated lines using "old" switches (like NETS with the 4ESS) or if it
        > is in fact dependent on a functioning PSTN/IXP network like the rest of the
        > phone system today after the Bell breakup. The NAWAS manual is not clear on
        > this.
        > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NAWAS
        > > > http://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/1550_2.pdf
        > > >
        > > > Kevin Anderson
        > > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • wftroskey
        Not to get too far OT, but I love when the software mispronounces things. (For a while, our local station pronounced LaGrange as Louisiana Grange . Now it
        Message 3 of 16 , Jul 20, 2013
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          Not to get too far OT, but I love when the software mispronounces things. (For a while, our local station pronounced LaGrange as "Louisiana Grange". Now it says "LAH-Grinj".) And we still have the female voice for the marine forecast...... ;-))


          Bill



          --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Mike Cowen <weldedrail@...> wrote:
          >
          > That brings up memories... The first time I heard the female voice
          > in DEN say "tonight" so passionately, I was ready for a cold shower.
          > :-) It was just that one word that sounded SO real. Sadly, here in
          > PHX, we have the male voice which suffers no such realism...
          >
          > Mike
          >
          >
          > At 08:19 AM 7/19/2013, you wrote:
          > >
          > >Each NWS office has a computer-based speech generator which converts alerts
          > >and forecasts into speech... [snip]
          > >
          > >John
          >
          > ---------------------------------------------------------------
          > Mike Cowen Practice random acts of kindness
          > and selfless acts of beauty.
          > mcowen@... -Anonymous
          >
        • OZOB99
          Here is a NAWAS BSP overview; I think others in this series have some CO configurations but I have nt found them online yet:
          Message 4 of 16 , Jul 20, 2013
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            Here is a NAWAS BSP overview; I think others in this series have some CO configurations but I have'nt found them online yet:

            http://www.telephonecollectors.info/index.php/browse/bsps/by-division-number/doc_view/10114-310-539-001-i1

            The NAWAS operation manuals previously posted have gone "404", so here is a 1966 version:

            http://www.scribd.com/doc/80541944/National-Warning-System-1966






            --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
            >
            > As you know, NAWAS was a warning system connecting state/local CD locations with federal entities; it used dedicated multipoint 4W private line circuits (GP4285-nn et al) within regions, and had interconnecting capability nationwide with all regions; the only PSN connection may have been dialup back up between certain locations.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Anderson, K9IUA" <k9iua@> wrote:
            > >
            > > How does NAWAS (National Warning System) fit into any of this? This is non-switched hierarchial "party-line" system, which uses specialized phones at each site. Some 2200+ nodes exist. It predates NETS, but has been apparently carried to the present. While GETS is switched through the phone system, I'd love to know whether NAWAS actually goes through the PSN network as dedicated lines using "old" switches (like NETS with the 4ESS) or if it is in fact dependent on a functioning PSTN/IXP network like the rest of the phone system today after the Bell breakup. The NAWAS manual is not clear on this.
            > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NAWAS
            > > http://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/1550_2.pdf
            > >
            > > Kevin Anderson
            > >
            > > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Tim Moriarty <tjmva001@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Which, as we all know (I hope, given all the posts I've done over the years ;-) ), evolved into the Government Emergency Telecommunications Service (GETS) and its wireless counterpart, the Wireless Priority Service (WPS).  For those who may not know, the National Communications System (NCS) which was one of the original components of DHS when it was created, merged into the Office of Emergency Communications, which was established by Congress after Katrina to focus on LMR-related issues; applicable websites are:
            > > >
            > > > http://www.dhs.gov/about-national-protection-and-programs-directorate
            > > > http://www.dhs.gov/office-cybersecurity-and-communications
            > > > http://www.dhs.gov/about-office-emergency-communications
            > > > https://www.dhs.gov/government-emergency-telecommunications-service-gets
            > > > https://www.dhs.gov/wireless-priority-service-wps
            > > >
            > > > And, for two other NCS legacy programs:
            > > >
            > > > http://www.dhs.gov/telecommunications-service-priority-tsp
            > > > http://www.dhs.gov/shares
            > > >
            > > > I've been a support contractor for GETS & WPS from '97-'10 and back again from last May until I go off the program in early September.  One of the documents I have in my archive file is a Xerox copy of a NETS brochure.  The easiest way to differentiate between the two is that NETS was intended to be a hardened, Federal-only, parallel network carried along by the PSTN, while GETS is an integrated element within the PSTN provided on a voluntary basis by the carriers, administered by the government and open to membership and use by Federal, state, tribal and local governments as well as the private sector and non-governmental organzation community, as long as the individual who use GETS & WPS perform national security / emergency preparedness functions.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > ________________________________
            > > > From: OZOB99 <ozob99@>
            > > > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            > > > Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2013 11:21 AM
            > > > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Nationwide Emergency Telecommunications Service(NETS)
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >  
            > > > Part of which was the little known "survivable common channel signaling within the AT&T 4ESS network" from the mid 1980's, AKA "AT&T survivable signaling network (SSN)";along with "commercial satellite communications interconnectivity(CSI)", and "commercial network survivability(CNS)".
            > > >
            > > > More in the book "Nationwide Emergency Telecommunications Service for National Security Telecommunications: Interim Report", online here:
            > > >
            > > > http://books.google.com/books?lpg=PP1&pg=PP1&id=5mYrAAAAYAAJ#v=onepage&q&f=false
            > > >
            > > > Also mentioned in this audit:
            > > >
            > > > http://www.dodig.mil/Audit/Audit2/92-059.pdf
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • unrecognizedresponse
            NAWAS Manual, 2001: http://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/1550_2.pdf 2005:
            Message 5 of 16 , Jul 20, 2013
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              NAWAS Manual, 2001:
              http://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/1550_2.pdf

              2005:
              http://www.fema.gov/library/file?type=publishedFile&file=national_warning_system_operations.pdf&fileid=cc5905b0-6a36-11e1-a5e0-001cc456982e

              Most info. points to EAS Primary Entry Points using the AT&T NAWAS network and Comlabs equip. It seems like the radio station ENDEC's are merely treated like NAWAS drops, except the terminal is not a desk set. NWR is still supposed to have an attack warning function (IIRC). NWS Forecast Offices (control points for the NWR xmitters) can receive the attack warning code via the NOAA wire and NAWAS. They have an attack warning script to read (we would hope Not automated) over NWR. Interoperability with EAS Presidential messages over NWR has never been well defined. I don't think they have a signal path. They'd have to transmit an EAN over NWR and advise people to tune elsewhere.

              This is probably the best resource I've found on the topic, although how much remains valid, I don't know. National Telecommunications Management Structure, SHARES NCS, FNARS and NECN have been the last resort (HF) links when wireline, IP and satellite fail. Supposedly, they had Harris Corp HF receivers at EAS PEP stations as an entry point from federal and military HF. The broadcast quality would be awful (like WWII overseas shortwave links, only worse with SSB). They were supposed to be providing triple redundancy to PEP's via HF, LL and Sirius XM.
              http://web.archive.org/web/20080625023050/http://www.cdc.gov/phin/conference/04conference/05-27-04/Session_12D_Ross_Merlin.pdf

              http://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-16/dc16-presentations/defcon-16-flux.pdf

              However, the ref. to "Spectel Operators Guide for EAS and Blast Conferences" in 2005 NAWAS makes me think they might be using Spectel bridges for EAS. I am almost positive they've said AT&T does and always has provided for NAWAS, EAS, and EBS.

              I came across something saying the primary reason for the 2011 EAS test failure was the use of a PSTN conference instead of the normal PEP conference. They fed radio station "on hold" music (Lady Gaga) into the network.

              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
              >
              > Here is a NAWAS BSP overview; I think others in this series have some CO configurations but I have'nt found them online yet:
              >
              > http://www.telephonecollectors.info/index.php/browse/bsps/by-division-number/doc_view/10114-310-539-001-i1
              >
              > The NAWAS operation manuals previously posted have gone "404", so here is a 1966 version:
              >
              > http://www.scribd.com/doc/80541944/National-Warning-System-1966
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@> wrote:
              > >
              > > As you know, NAWAS was a warning system connecting state/local CD locations with federal entities; it used dedicated multipoint 4W private line circuits (GP4285-nn et al) within regions, and had interconnecting capability nationwide with all regions; the only PSN connection may have been dialup back up between certain locations.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin Anderson, K9IUA" <k9iua@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > How does NAWAS (National Warning System) fit into any of this? This is non-switched hierarchial "party-line" system, which uses specialized phones at each site. Some 2200+ nodes exist. It predates NETS, but has been apparently carried to the present. While GETS is switched through the phone system, I'd love to know whether NAWAS actually goes through the PSN network as dedicated lines using "old" switches (like NETS with the 4ESS) or if it is in fact dependent on a functioning PSTN/IXP network like the rest of the phone system today after the Bell breakup. The NAWAS manual is not clear on this.
              > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NAWAS
              > > > http://www.fema.gov/pdf/library/1550_2.pdf
              > > >
              > > > Kevin Anderson
              > > >
              > > > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Tim Moriarty <tjmva001@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Which, as we all know (I hope, given all the posts I've done over the years ;-) ), evolved into the Government Emergency Telecommunications Service (GETS) and its wireless counterpart, the Wireless Priority Service (WPS).  For those who may not know, the National Communications System (NCS) which was one of the original components of DHS when it was created, merged into the Office of Emergency Communications, which was established by Congress after Katrina to focus on LMR-related issues; applicable websites are:
              > > > >
              > > > > http://www.dhs.gov/about-national-protection-and-programs-directorate
              > > > > http://www.dhs.gov/office-cybersecurity-and-communications
              > > > > http://www.dhs.gov/about-office-emergency-communications
              > > > > https://www.dhs.gov/government-emergency-telecommunications-service-gets
              > > > > https://www.dhs.gov/wireless-priority-service-wps
              > > > >
              > > > > And, for two other NCS legacy programs:
              > > > >
              > > > > http://www.dhs.gov/telecommunications-service-priority-tsp
              > > > > http://www.dhs.gov/shares
              > > > >
              > > > > I've been a support contractor for GETS & WPS from '97-'10 and back again from last May until I go off the program in early September.  One of the documents I have in my archive file is a Xerox copy of a NETS brochure.  The easiest way to differentiate between the two is that NETS was intended to be a hardened, Federal-only, parallel network carried along by the PSTN, while GETS is an integrated element within the PSTN provided on a voluntary basis by the carriers, administered by the government and open to membership and use by Federal, state, tribal and local governments as well as the private sector and non-governmental organzation community, as long as the individual who use GETS & WPS perform national security / emergency preparedness functions.
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > ________________________________
              > > > > From: OZOB99 <ozob99@>
              > > > > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
              > > > > Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2013 11:21 AM
              > > > > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Nationwide Emergency Telecommunications Service(NETS)
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >  
              > > > > Part of which was the little known "survivable common channel signaling within the AT&T 4ESS network" from the mid 1980's, AKA "AT&T survivable signaling network (SSN)";along with "commercial satellite communications interconnectivity(CSI)", and "commercial network survivability(CNS)".
              > > > >
              > > > > More in the book "Nationwide Emergency Telecommunications Service for National Security Telecommunications: Interim Report", online here:
              > > > >
              > > > > http://books.google.com/books?lpg=PP1&pg=PP1&id=5mYrAAAAYAAJ#v=onepage&q&f=false
              > > > >
              > > > > Also mentioned in this audit:
              > > > >
              > > > > http://www.dodig.mil/Audit/Audit2/92-059.pdf
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
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