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Re: Cold War Comms Advertisements

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  • OZOB99
    I forgot to say I made a typo on the Northampton ad, it should have read REL 2500 instead of 2600.
    Message 1 of 4 , May 8 2:38 PM
      I forgot to say I made a typo on the Northampton ad, it should have read REL 2500 instead of 2600.

      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Nick England <navy.radio@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Fascinating - you're a good archeologist!
      > > You say FRC-92 for Wright and Northampton - that's not in the ad - is
      > > that just inference from our previous speculation on the installations
      > > at Cape Cod, Lewes, and Lola? Or some additional info? FRC-92 is
      > > listed as shore installation equipment.
      >
      >
      > It was an assumption based on an assumption(because I've found nothing online stating what the gear was) the shore gear would most likely be the FRC-92 and maybe it was simpler to use this aboard ship rather than procure two additional units of another designation.
      >
      > The FRC-92 may have been for some shore links overseas and not at the three shore tropo sites, which may have used other 2500 models such as FRC/-96,97,101.
      >
      > Having said that that, this critical mission would most likely use the latest in tropo gear, & the 2600 was available in 1964 about the time of equipping the ships, so the gear might have been 2600 type FRC-nnn on shore and SRC-nn on the ships.
      >
      >
      > >
      > > What caught my eye was the REL Evolution ad which mentions AN/SRC-24 -
      > > that would be a shipboard system designation as apposed to FRC for
      > > Fixed/Shore installations. I can't find any info on SRC-24 though. It
      > > is listed as a tube-type REL 2100 as opposed to transistorized 2600
      > > which came out in 1964.
      >
      >
      > I found nothing on the SRC-24 either.
      >
      > >
      > > Do you think Wright did NOT have any tropo link until the installation
      > > of that big tropo antenna in 1965-66?
      >
      > That's my guess; the Wright used a UHF MUX link to Dam Neck Va into 1964 until the tropo was installed.
      >
      >
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc2.htm
      > > Looking at earlier photos I can't identify a likely candidate antenna.
      > >
      > > The ad says Northampton was first to have shipboard tropo-link. I'm
      > > gonna bet that was AN/SRC-24. Looking at the sequence of antennas
      > > installed on her
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1.htm
      > > there are several things I am not clear on yet.
      >
      >
      > It's certainly a possibility.
      >
      >
      > >
      > > In 1962 she still had the big AN/SPS-2 search radar mounted on the
      > > forward tower -
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1/cc1-1962-hr-1208.JPG
      > > There is also a UHF(?) dish mounted on a mast just forward of the
      > > bridge. This dish appears to have no elevation mechanism which I would
      > > think essential for tropo work - so what was this antenna for?
      >
      >
      > Possible UHF MUX link like the Wright had, if a similar antenna appears on the Wright then it's likely.
      >
      >
      > > In the 1962 Cruise Book, there are photos with the dish moved to
      > > replace the search radar
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1/cc1-62book-03.jpg
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1/cc1-62book-04.jpg
      > > So it would have had elevation capability - was this the first
      > > tropo-link antenna?
      >
      >
      > My guess is yes
      >
      >
      > >
      > > In April 1963, there is what looks like a 4 element helical array UHF
      > > antenna mounted on the forward tower and the dish again mounted on the
      > > mast just forward of the bridge.
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1/cc1-nyc-1963.jpg
      > > The helical array does appear to have elevation capability - was this
      > > the first tropo-link antenna?
      >
      >
      > I doubt that, I think the big dish gain was paramount for continuity
      > of transmission(especially in foul weather & rolling seas;the weather plagued the Texas Towers & Dew Line tropo's); perhaps it was an interim or trial tropo antenna.
      >
      >
      > >
      > > In June 1964 it looks like the helical array has been replaced by a
      > > dish similar to the one on the forward mast. Both are now present
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1/northhampton-02.jpg
      > > Was this the April 1964 tropo antenna replacement referred to in the
      > > 1965 cruise book?
      >
      > Again my guess FWIW is yes
      > >
      > > Then in 1970 she had a whole different configuration -
      > > http://www.virhistory.com/navy/ships/cc1/northhampton-01.jpg
      > >
      >
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