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Plum Island Comms Facilities

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  • OZOB99
    No, not the biological site in NY;I thought so at first glance, but these are in MA: Snippet from http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a146142.pdf RADC
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 31, 2013
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      No, not the biological site in NY;I thought so at first glance, but these are in MA:

      Snippet from

      http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a146142.pdf

      "RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility
      The RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility (EMTF) is
      located on Great Neck on an island situated in the Plum Island Sound at the
      mouth of the Ipswich and Eagle Hill Rivers. The facility is in the Eastern
      Plateau rhysiographic Region. Located on the north ridge of Great Neck, the
      facility is at an elevation of approximately 123 feet MSL. The land slopes
      steeply to water level on all sides. Great Neck is surrounded on three
      sides by the above water bodies and to the southeast by a saltwater marsh.
      Figure 3-6 illustrates the topography of the site and the surrounding area."

      --------------------------------------------------------------------

      Snippet from

      http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/012270.pdf


      "2. High-Power Pulse System
      Under a Lincoln Laboratory subcontract, the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in
      installing transmitting and receiving equipment and providing other services for the placing of
      the Air Force Field Station at Plum Island in an operational condition. Originally scheduled to
      begin 1 January 1953, the actual starting date was unavoidably delayed until 23 March 1953.
      Installation of equipment will proceed in parallel with impedance, phase, and pattern
      measurements of the antenna during the next quarter.
      Constructions of the coherent detector for use with the high-power pulse system has
      been completed at the Lincoln Laboratory, and it is now being aligned and tested preparatory to
      installation at Plum Island."



      and this from WIKI on Plum Island airport:

      "
      Frothingham continued to operate the airport for the next 24 years. In 1946, he added a second runway (the current grass strip) and built an additional hangar. Frothingham, who had the sole Northeast dealership for Aeronca airplanes in the 1940s and 1950s, provided a variety of aviation services, including maintenance and flight training. The Raytheon Company used the airport for radar testing during this period."
    • cpe122
      There appears to be a lot of copper coming out of Greenport that goes all the way to the end of the north fork and down a pole into the rocky beach. I
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 31, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        There appears to be a lot of copper coming out of Greenport that goes all the way to the end of the "north fork" and down a pole into the rocky beach. I wouldn't have thought Plum Island to be all that comms intensive. Some of it looks to have had N (now T) carrier on it.

        /cpe
        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
        >
        > No, not the biological site in NY;I thought so at first glance, but these are in MA:
        >
        > Snippet from
        >
        > http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a146142.pdf
        >
        > "RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility
        > The RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility (EMTF) is
        > located on Great Neck on an island situated in the Plum Island Sound at the
        > mouth of the Ipswich and Eagle Hill Rivers. The facility is in the Eastern
        > Plateau rhysiographic Region. Located on the north ridge of Great Neck, the
        > facility is at an elevation of approximately 123 feet MSL. The land slopes
        > steeply to water level on all sides. Great Neck is surrounded on three
        > sides by the above water bodies and to the southeast by a saltwater marsh.
        > Figure 3-6 illustrates the topography of the site and the surrounding area."
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > Snippet from
        >
        > http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/012270.pdf
        >
        >
        > "2. High-Power Pulse System
        > Under a Lincoln Laboratory subcontract, the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in
        > installing transmitting and receiving equipment and providing other services for the placing of
        > the Air Force Field Station at Plum Island in an operational condition. Originally scheduled to
        > begin 1 January 1953, the actual starting date was unavoidably delayed until 23 March 1953.
        > Installation of equipment will proceed in parallel with impedance, phase, and pattern
        > measurements of the antenna during the next quarter.
        > Constructions of the coherent detector for use with the high-power pulse system has
        > been completed at the Lincoln Laboratory, and it is now being aligned and tested preparatory to
        > installation at Plum Island."
        >
        >
        >
        > and this from WIKI on Plum Island airport:
        >
        > "
        > Frothingham continued to operate the airport for the next 24 years. In 1946, he added a second runway (the current grass strip) and built an additional hangar. Frothingham, who had the sole Northeast dealership for Aeronca airplanes in the 1940s and 1950s, provided a variety of aviation services, including maintenance and flight training. The Raytheon Company used the airport for radar testing during this period."
        >
      • recon12000
           A small facility still exists at the MA site across the road  (north) of the water tower, but the empty land there 60 years ago has been heavily
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 1, 2013
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             A small facility still exists at the MA site across the road  (north) of the water tower, but the empty land there 60 years ago has been heavily developed.  Google Earth imagery from 6/18/2010 shows the facility very clearly @  42 42.084 N 70 48.000 W

          with Plum Island Airport at 42 42.725 N 70 50.376 W .

           

             Raytheon did use the Airport for occasional radar testing, but it was all mobile units, truck or trailer mounted naval contract ship board and early SAM radars for the HAWK program. The airport was 18 miles away with an unobstructed line of sight from the top of the company's Missile System Divisions manufacturing site located in Shawsheen Village in Andover, MA. They hoisted the HAWK radars up the side of the building to the roof and measured their output at the airport until the ir Pelham, NH test site was built in the early 60's. Having Pease AFB up the road was especially fun for both the Raytheon engineers and the USAF crews, since Raytheon would notify Pease when they would be testing radars and both would play cat and mouse as the air crews attempted to jam or break lock and the engineers tweaked the system. Pelham is still in use today, but the rural area free of RFI is gone now and the surrounding area is also heavily developed.

           

             Another Air Defense Radar test site operated by MITRE Lincoln Labs durning this period was located on top of the Boston Hill Ski Area in North Andover, MA. Through the late 50's and 60's there was a HUGE red and white rotating array whipping around day and night on top of a 9 story concrete tower, while the t-bar tow line transported skiers up to the fence at it's base. During it's career, F-86's , F-89's  and F-106's  would make low passes over the area from different directions going straight at the radar for reasons we never knew, but were great fun for teenage boys to watch from Holt Hill to the NW. The multi story concrete building is still there with a flat roof and mostly used as a comm antenna platform @ 42 38.760 N 71 5.625 W. It was all very hush hush and had armed guards, Air Force sedans and officers and enlisted men coming and going and was rumored to have a subterranean bunker under it, but this was the 50's when nothing the Gov't did was questioned. More info on it is here: http://www.ll.mit.edu/about/History/earlywarningradars3.html  and at the RADOMES web site here:  http://tinyurl.com/bt2jury .

           

               NE Massachusetts was a fascinating area to grow up in late 50's and 60's, what with the Nike sites, the SAC AFBs, circling the Texas Tower off Nantucket during a fishing trip in the early 60's , the canceled ABM MSR hole in the ground in North Andover and all the Gov't research projects being funded. Got my first bike at 16 and had found the Burn Pit for fire crew training at Hanscom AF Base within the 1st week and jumped the fence, pried the nomenclature plates off a toasted F-86 there and skedaddled  as the APs roared across the runways in a crew cab pick-up, lights flashing. Good times...

           

          Regards, Ron 



          ----- Original Message -----




          From: "OZOB99" <ozob99@...>
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 10:30:36 AM
          Subject: [coldwarcomms] Plum Island Comms Facilities

           




          No, not the biological site in NY;I thought so at first glance, but these are in MA:

          Snippet from

          http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a146142.pdf

          "RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility
          The RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility (EMTF) is
          located on Great Neck on an island situated in the Plum Island Sound at the
          mouth of the Ipswich and Eagle Hill Rivers. The facility is in the Eastern
          Plateau rhysiographic Region. Located on the north ridge of Great Neck, the
          facility is at an elevation of approximately 123 feet MSL. The land slopes
          steeply to water level on all sides. Great Neck is surrounded on three
          sides by the above water bodies and to the southeast by a saltwater marsh.
          Figure 3-6 illustrates the topography of the site and the surrounding area."

          ----------------------------------------------------------

          Snippet from

          http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/012270.pdf

          "2. High-Power Pulse System
          Under a Lincoln Laboratory subcontract, the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in
          installing transmitting and receiving equipment and providing other services for the placing of
          the Air Force Field Station at Plum Island in an operational condition. Originally scheduled to
          begin 1 January 1953, the actual starting date was unavoidably delayed until 23 March 1953.
          Installation of equipment will proceed in parallel with impedance, phase, and pattern
          measurements of the antenna during the next quarter.
          Constructions of the coherent detector for use with the high-power pulse system has
          been completed at the Lincoln Laboratory, and it is now being aligned and tested preparatory to
          installation at Plum Island."

           


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • OZOB99
          thanks, nice to get detailed recollections of sites like these.
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 1, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            thanks, nice to get detailed recollections of sites like these.


            --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, rojoha@... wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >    A small facility still exists at the MA site across the road  (north) of the water tower, but the empty land there 60 years ago has been heavily developed.  Google Earth imagery from 6/18/2010 shows the facility very clearly @  42 42.084 N 70 48.000 W
            >
            > with Plum Island Airport at 42 42.725 N 70 50.376 W .
            >
            >  
            >
            >    Raytheon did use the Airport for occasional radar testing, but it was all mobile units, truck or trailer mounted naval contract ship board and early SAM radars for the HAWK program. The airport was 18 miles away with an unobstructed line of sight from the top of the company's Missile System Divisions manufacturing site located in Shawsheen Village in Andover, MA. They hoisted the HAWK radars up the side of the building to the roof and measured their output at the airport until the ir Pelham, NH test site was built in the early 60's. Having Pease AFB up the road was especially fun for both the Raytheon engineers and the USAF crews, since Raytheon would notify Pease when they would be testing radars and both would play cat and mouse as the air crews attempted to jam or break lock and the engineers tweaked the system. Pelham is still in use today, but the rural area free of RFI is gone now and the surrounding area is also heavily developed.
            >
            >  
            >
            >    Another Air Defense Radar test site operated by MITRE Lincoln Labs durning this period was located on top of the Boston Hill Ski Area in North Andover, MA. Through the late 50's and 60's there was a HUGE red and white rotating array whipping around day and night on top of a 9 story concrete tower, while the t-bar tow line transported skiers up to the fence at it's base. During it's career, F-86's , F-89's  and F-106's  would make low passes over the area from different directions going straight at the radar for reasons we never knew, but were great fun for teenage boys to watch from Holt Hill to the NW. The multi story concrete building is still there with a flat roof and mostly used as a comm antenna platform @ 42 38.760 N 71 5.625 W. It was all very hush hush and had armed guards, Air Force sedans and officers and enlisted men coming and going and was rumored to have a subterranean bunker under it, but this was the 50's when nothing the Gov't did was questioned. More info on it is here: http://www.ll.mit.edu/about/History/earlywarningradars3.html  and at the RADOMES web site here:  http://tinyurl.com/bt2jury .
            >
            >  
            >
            >      NE Massachusetts was a fascinating area to grow up in late 50's and 60's, what with the Nike sites, the SAC AFBs, circling the Texas Tower off Nantucket during a fishing trip in the early 60's , the canceled ABM MSR hole in the ground in North Andover and all the Gov't research projects being funded. Got my first bike at 16 and had found the Burn Pit for fire crew training at Hanscom AF Base within the 1st week and jumped the fence, pried the nomenclature plates off a toasted F-86 there and skedaddled  as the APs roared across the runways in a crew cab pick-up, lights flashing. Good times...
            >
            >  
            >
            > Regards, Ron 
            >
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > From: "OZOB99" <ozob99@...>
            > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 10:30:36 AM
            > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Plum Island Comms Facilities
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > No, not the biological site in NY;I thought so at first glance, but these are in MA:
            >
            > Snippet from
            >
            > http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a146142.pdf
            >
            > "RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility
            > The RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility (EMTF) is
            > located on Great Neck on an island situated in the Plum Island Sound at the
            > mouth of the Ipswich and Eagle Hill Rivers. The facility is in the Eastern
            > Plateau rhysiographic Region. Located on the north ridge of Great Neck, the
            > facility is at an elevation of approximately 123 feet MSL. The land slopes
            > steeply to water level on all sides. Great Neck is surrounded on three
            > sides by the above water bodies and to the southeast by a saltwater marsh.
            > Figure 3-6 illustrates the topography of the site and the surrounding area."
            >
            > ----------------------------------------------------------
            >
            > Snippet from
            >
            > http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/012270.pdf
            >
            > "2. High-Power Pulse System
            > Under a Lincoln Laboratory subcontract, the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in
            > installing transmitting and receiving equipment and providing other services for the placing of
            > the Air Force Field Station at Plum Island in an operational condition. Originally scheduled to
            > begin 1 January 1953, the actual starting date was unavoidably delayed until 23 March 1953.
            > Installation of equipment will proceed in parallel with impedance, phase, and pattern
            > measurements of the antenna during the next quarter.
            > Constructions of the coherent detector for use with the high-power pulse system has
            > been completed at the Lincoln Laboratory, and it is now being aligned and tested preparatory to
            > installation at Plum Island."
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • taskforceleader
            The Ipswich facility is currently being torn down. http://www.salemnews.com/local/x614300623/Air-Force-to-demolish-local-Cold-War-era-antenna-station Googling
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 1, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              The Ipswich facility is currently being torn down.

              http://www.salemnews.com/local/x614300623/Air-Force-to-demolish-local-Cold-War-era-antenna-station

              Googling "Ipswich Air Force" yields many similar stories.


              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
              >
              > thanks, nice to get detailed recollections of sites like these.
              >
              >
              > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, rojoha@ wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >    A small facility still exists at the MA site across the road  (north) of the water tower, but the empty land there 60 years ago has been heavily developed.  Google Earth imagery from 6/18/2010 shows the facility very clearly @  42 42.084 N 70 48.000 W
              > >
              > > with Plum Island Airport at 42 42.725 N 70 50.376 W .
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >    Raytheon did use the Airport for occasional radar testing, but it was all mobile units, truck or trailer mounted naval contract ship board and early SAM radars for the HAWK program. The airport was 18 miles away with an unobstructed line of sight from the top of the company's Missile System Divisions manufacturing site located in Shawsheen Village in Andover, MA. They hoisted the HAWK radars up the side of the building to the roof and measured their output at the airport until the ir Pelham, NH test site was built in the early 60's. Having Pease AFB up the road was especially fun for both the Raytheon engineers and the USAF crews, since Raytheon would notify Pease when they would be testing radars and both would play cat and mouse as the air crews attempted to jam or break lock and the engineers tweaked the system. Pelham is still in use today, but the rural area free of RFI is gone now and the surrounding area is also heavily developed.
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >    Another Air Defense Radar test site operated by MITRE Lincoln Labs durning this period was located on top of the Boston Hill Ski Area in North Andover, MA. Through the late 50's and 60's there was a HUGE red and white rotating array whipping around day and night on top of a 9 story concrete tower, while the t-bar tow line transported skiers up to the fence at it's base. During it's career, F-86's , F-89's  and F-106's  would make low passes over the area from different directions going straight at the radar for reasons we never knew, but were great fun for teenage boys to watch from Holt Hill to the NW. The multi story concrete building is still there with a flat roof and mostly used as a comm antenna platform @ 42 38.760 N 71 5.625 W. It was all very hush hush and had armed guards, Air Force sedans and officers and enlisted men coming and going and was rumored to have a subterranean bunker under it, but this was the 50's when nothing the Gov't did was questioned. More info on it is here: http://www.ll.mit.edu/about/History/earlywarningradars3.html  and at the RADOMES web site here:  http://tinyurl.com/bt2jury .
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >      NE Massachusetts was a fascinating area to grow up in late 50's and 60's, what with the Nike sites, the SAC AFBs, circling the Texas Tower off Nantucket during a fishing trip in the early 60's , the canceled ABM MSR hole in the ground in North Andover and all the Gov't research projects being funded. Got my first bike at 16 and had found the Burn Pit for fire crew training at Hanscom AF Base within the 1st week and jumped the fence, pried the nomenclature plates off a toasted F-86 there and skedaddled  as the APs roared across the runways in a crew cab pick-up, lights flashing. Good times...
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > > Regards, Ron 
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > From: "OZOB99" <ozob99@>
              > > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 10:30:36 AM
              > > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Plum Island Comms Facilities
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > No, not the biological site in NY;I thought so at first glance, but these are in MA:
              > >
              > > Snippet from
              > >
              > > http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a146142.pdf
              > >
              > > "RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility
              > > The RADC Electromagnetic Test and Measurement Facility (EMTF) is
              > > located on Great Neck on an island situated in the Plum Island Sound at the
              > > mouth of the Ipswich and Eagle Hill Rivers. The facility is in the Eastern
              > > Plateau rhysiographic Region. Located on the north ridge of Great Neck, the
              > > facility is at an elevation of approximately 123 feet MSL. The land slopes
              > > steeply to water level on all sides. Great Neck is surrounded on three
              > > sides by the above water bodies and to the southeast by a saltwater marsh.
              > > Figure 3-6 illustrates the topography of the site and the surrounding area."
              > >
              > > ----------------------------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Snippet from
              > >
              > > http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/012270.pdf
              > >
              > > "2. High-Power Pulse System
              > > Under a Lincoln Laboratory subcontract, the Raytheon Manufacturing Company in
              > > installing transmitting and receiving equipment and providing other services for the placing of
              > > the Air Force Field Station at Plum Island in an operational condition. Originally scheduled to
              > > begin 1 January 1953, the actual starting date was unavoidably delayed until 23 March 1953.
              > > Installation of equipment will proceed in parallel with impedance, phase, and pattern
              > > measurements of the antenna during the next quarter.
              > > Constructions of the coherent detector for use with the high-power pulse system has
              > > been completed at the Lincoln Laboratory, and it is now being aligned and tested preparatory to
              > > installation at Plum Island."
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • Kevin Anderson, K9IUA
              ... The practice of buzzing radar sites I believe goes way back - the so-called bubble check. While not needed for a site without a dome, I understand the
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 2, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, rojoha@... wrote:
                >
                > Another Air Defense Radar test site operated by MITRE Lincoln
                > Labs durning this period was located on top of the Boston Hill Ski
                > Area in North Andover, MA. Through the late 50's and 60's there
                > was a HUGE red and white rotating array whipping around day
                > and night on top of a 9 story concrete tower, while the t-bar 
                > tow line transported skiers up to the fence at it's base. During
                > it's career, F-86's , F-89's  and F-106's  would make low passes
                > over the area from different directions going straight at the
                > radar for reasons we never knew, but were great fun for teenage
                > boys to watch from Holt Hill to the NW.

                The practice of buzzing radar sites I believe goes way back - the so-called "bubble check." While not needed for a site without a dome, I understand the original reason was for a visual inspection of the air-inflated radome. Later, with fiberglass radomes, this wouldn't be necessary, but was still nonetheless fun for the controllers at out-of-the-way radar stations as a diversion and a chance to feel connected to the world.

                Kevin Anderson
              • Joe
                ... In the late 1960 s, while I was at a TDY assignment with the USAF at Hofn Air Station in Iceland, we had a bubble check . I heard the airmen yelling
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 3, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 4/3/2013 5:11 AM, coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com wrote:
                  >
                  > The practice of buzzing radar sites I believe goes way back - the so-called "bubble check"


                  In the late 1960's, while I was at a TDY assignment with the USAF at
                  Hofn Air Station in Iceland, we had a "bubble check". I heard the
                  airmen yelling "bubble check" and we all went outside. They didn't tell
                  me what was happening, all they said was "get outside". I saw a little
                  speck on the horizon over the water that was rapidly approaching that
                  turned out to be a fighter (F-16?). I swear that the jet flew sideways
                  between the radar domes, turned upwards to the sky, lit it's
                  afterburners and disappeared in the sky. Quite and experience and
                  probably a very illegal maneuver.

                  I was told that the bubble check was a test of the radar systems ability
                  to detect a low flying aircraft on the horizon. That's all they would
                  tell me. after that, life at Hofn AS returned to the humdrum life of 24
                  hours of daylight. Bubble checks seemed to be a highlight of entertainment.

                  Joe
                • Steve
                  Joe - Yes, the bubble checks of radar stations goes way back. I also saw bubble checks at Mt Hebo AFS. OR and the plane was an F-89 interceptor a/c that flew
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 4, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Joe - Yes, the "bubble checks" of radar stations goes way back. I also saw bubble checks at Mt Hebo AFS. OR and the plane was an F-89 interceptor a/c that flew between two of our radomes. We were also flown over by a flight of three B-52 bombers about 500 feet above us that came in over the Pacific and then pulled up to just under 4000 feet for the overflight. Mt Hebo AFS was 5 air miles from the Pacific and 3154 feet above sea level.

                    Mt Hebo AFS was one of many CONUS radar stations operated and maintained by the Air Force during the Cold War. There are photos and documents on AF Radar Stations at www.radomes.org/museum/ . There is a picture of a simulated bubble check at this web site and "The Peacekeepers" book about these radar stations is available at www.afrmaonline.org/ and includes another simulated photo of a "bubble check" at Mt Hebo AFS on the front cover.

                    The radomes used by the AF were used to protect the radar antenna from adverse weather including high winds and snow. The radomes were either rigid or inflatable and some were huge. At Mt Hebo AFS the largest was a rigid dome about 140 feet in diameter and 100 feet high. It was installed on an FPS-24 search radar tower that itself was 85 feet tall. This tower and radome were easily seen on the horizon and from 50 miles at sea.

                    Steve Weatherly
                    689th Radar Squadron 65-67
                    Mt Hebo AFS, OR
                  • OZOB99
                    ... A more detailed article about the gear & severe weather there is , Recollections of the AN/FPS-24 Radar at Mt Hebo AFS ,on the radomes.org website.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Apr 4, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Here is an anecdote from a radar vets group:

                      > most of the radars at Mt. Hebo AFS, Oregon were covered by
                      > inflatable radomes. When I arrived in Feb 1960, the search (AN/MPS-
                      > 11) and both height finders (AN/FPS-6 and -6A) had inflatable
                      > radomes. When the AN/FPS-26 height-finder was installed, it, too,
                      > had an inflatable radome, at which time there were 4 of them on
                      > site. The AN/FPS-6 was subsequently removed (replaced by the AN/FPS-
                      > 26) and the number was back to 3. After the AN/FPS-24 was
                      > commissioned as the search, the AN/MPS-11 was removed and the
                      > inflatable radome count was down to 2. When the AN/FPS-6A was
                      > changed to be an AN/FPS-90, the radome was changed, but was still an
                      > inflatable one, so the count remained 2. The AN/FPS-24 had 3
                      > attempts at being covered by a rigid radome (first one destroyed by
                      > winds before complete--1962; second one completed in 1963 and
                      > survived about a year before being hit by lightning and destroyed by
                      > winds; the third one was a different construction and lasted several
                      > years before it, too, was destroyed by wind forces) but never had an
                      > inflatable one (I doubt that one that big was possible--too much
                      > flexion). After the demise of the 3rd rigid radome on the AN/FPS-24,
                      > that radar was removed and replaced in situ by an AN/FPS-27, and it
                      > was covered by an inflatable radome (I think--I wasn't there and
                      > never saw it) which would have given the site 3 inflatables again."

                      A more detailed article about the gear & severe weather there is , "Recollections of the AN/FPS-24 Radar at Mt Hebo AFS",on the radomes.org website.





                      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <lweatherly4@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Joe - Yes, the "bubble checks" of radar stations goes way back. I also saw bubble checks at Mt Hebo AFS. OR and the plane was an F-89 interceptor a/c that flew between two of our radomes. We were also flown over by a flight of three B-52 bombers about 500 feet above us that came in over the Pacific and then pulled up to just under 4000 feet for the overflight. Mt Hebo AFS was 5 air miles from the Pacific and 3154 feet above sea level.
                      >
                      > Mt Hebo AFS was one of many CONUS radar stations operated and maintained by the Air Force during the Cold War. There are photos and documents on AF Radar Stations at www.radomes.org/museum/ . There is a picture of a simulated bubble check at this web site and "The Peacekeepers" book about these radar stations is available at www.afrmaonline.org/ and includes another simulated photo of a "bubble check" at Mt Hebo AFS on the front cover.
                      >
                      > The radomes used by the AF were used to protect the radar antenna from adverse weather including high winds and snow. The radomes were either rigid or inflatable and some were huge. At Mt Hebo AFS the largest was a rigid dome about 140 feet in diameter and 100 feet high. It was installed on an FPS-24 search radar tower that itself was 85 feet tall. This tower and radome were easily seen on the horizon and from 50 miles at sea.
                      >
                      > Steve Weatherly
                      > 689th Radar Squadron 65-67
                      > Mt Hebo AFS, OR
                      >
                    • Pj
                      I m sure some of you still actively monitor the GHFS system but I recently received reports from two friends that last night there was an influx of Skyking
                      Message 10 of 18 , Apr 4, 2013
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                        I'm sure some of you still actively monitor the GHFS system but I recently received reports from two friends that last night there was an influx of Skyking messages and one or two stating "weapons are authorized". I believe one of them has a recording of that and awaiting a copy of it.

                        Sent from my iPhone

                        On Apr 4, 2013, at 10:09 AM, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:

                        > Here is an anecdote from a radar vets group:
                        >
                        >> most of the radars at Mt. Hebo AFS, Oregon were covered by
                        >> inflatable radomes. When I arrived in Feb 1960, the search (AN/MPS-
                        >> 11) and both height finders (AN/FPS-6 and -6A) had inflatable
                        >> radomes. When the AN/FPS-26 height-finder was installed, it, too,
                        >> had an inflatable radome, at which time there were 4 of them on
                        >> site. The AN/FPS-6 was subsequently removed (replaced by the AN/FPS-
                        >> 26) and the number was back to 3. After the AN/FPS-24 was
                        >> commissioned as the search, the AN/MPS-11 was removed and the
                        >> inflatable radome count was down to 2. When the AN/FPS-6A was
                        >> changed to be an AN/FPS-90, the radome was changed, but was still an
                        >> inflatable one, so the count remained 2. The AN/FPS-24 had 3
                        >> attempts at being covered by a rigid radome (first one destroyed by
                        >> winds before complete--1962; second one completed in 1963 and
                        >> survived about a year before being hit by lightning and destroyed by
                        >> winds; the third one was a different construction and lasted several
                        >> years before it, too, was destroyed by wind forces) but never had an
                        >> inflatable one (I doubt that one that big was possible--too much
                        >> flexion). After the demise of the 3rd rigid radome on the AN/FPS-24,
                        >> that radar was removed and replaced in situ by an AN/FPS-27, and it
                        >> was covered by an inflatable radome (I think--I wasn't there and
                        >> never saw it) which would have given the site 3 inflatables again."
                        >
                        > A more detailed article about the gear & severe weather there is , "Recollections of the AN/FPS-24 Radar at Mt Hebo AFS",on the radomes.org website.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <lweatherly4@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >> Joe - Yes, the "bubble checks" of radar stations goes way back. I also saw bubble checks at Mt Hebo AFS. OR and the plane was an F-89 interceptor a/c that flew between two of our radomes. We were also flown over by a flight of three B-52 bombers about 500 feet above us that came in over the Pacific and then pulled up to just under 4000 feet for the overflight. Mt Hebo AFS was 5 air miles from the Pacific and 3154 feet above sea level.
                        >>
                        >> Mt Hebo AFS was one of many CONUS radar stations operated and maintained by the Air Force during the Cold War. There are photos and documents on AF Radar Stations at www.radomes.org/museum/ . There is a picture of a simulated bubble check at this web site and "The Peacekeepers" book about these radar stations is available at www.afrmaonline.org/ and includes another simulated photo of a "bubble check" at Mt Hebo AFS on the front cover.
                        >>
                        >> The radomes used by the AF were used to protect the radar antenna from adverse weather including high winds and snow. The radomes were either rigid or inflatable and some were huge. At Mt Hebo AFS the largest was a rigid dome about 140 feet in diameter and 100 feet high. It was installed on an FPS-24 search radar tower that itself was 85 feet tall. This tower and radome were easily seen on the horizon and from 50 miles at sea.
                        >>
                        >> Steve Weatherly
                        >> 689th Radar Squadron 65-67
                        >> Mt Hebo AFS, OR
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • T&K Christensen
                        GHFS FDM (Force Direction Messages) are now running 30 and 34 characters. A change from many years of 22 and 26 characters. This change seems to have taken
                        Message 11 of 18 , Apr 4, 2013
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                          GHFS FDM (Force Direction Messages) are now running 30 and 34 characters. A
                          change from many years of 22 and 26 characters. This change seems to have
                          taken place with the latest code change. Also hearing more airborne command
                          center traffic... could be NOAC, LookingGlass or other TACAMO airborne CP
                          traffic.

                          When you hear something in the clear like "Weapons are authorized" it is
                          intentional for the enemy to intercept as part of the high stakes game of
                          international politics.


                          Tim


                          _____

                          From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
                          Behalf Of Pj
                          Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2013 9:12 AM
                          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [coldwarcomms] Recent N Korea comms




                          I'm sure some of you still actively monitor the GHFS system but I recently
                          received reports from two friends that last night there was an influx of
                          Skyking messages and one or two stating "weapons are authorized". I believe
                          one of them has a recording of that and awaiting a copy of it.

                          Sent from my iPhone

                          On Apr 4, 2013, at 10:09 AM, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...
                          <mailto:ozob99%40yahoo.com> > wrote:

                          > Here is an anecdote from a radar vets group:
                          >
                          >> most of the radars at Mt. Hebo AFS, Oregon were covered by
                          >> inflatable radomes. When I arrived in Feb 1960, the search (AN/MPS-
                          >> 11) and both height finders (AN/FPS-6 and -6A) had inflatable
                          >> radomes. When the AN/FPS-26 height-finder was installed, it, too,
                          >> had an inflatable radome, at which time there were 4 of them on
                          >> site. The AN/FPS-6 was subsequently removed (replaced by the AN/FPS-
                          >> 26) and the number was back to 3. After the AN/FPS-24 was
                          >> commissioned as the search, the AN/MPS-11 was removed and the
                          >> inflatable radome count was down to 2. When the AN/FPS-6A was
                          >> changed to be an AN/FPS-90, the radome was changed, but was still an
                          >> inflatable one, so the count remained 2. The AN/FPS-24 had 3
                          >> attempts at being covered by a rigid radome (first one destroyed by
                          >> winds before complete--1962; second one completed in 1963 and
                          >> survived about a year before being hit by lightning and destroyed by
                          >> winds; the third one was a different construction and lasted several
                          >> years before it, too, was destroyed by wind forces) but never had an
                          >> inflatable one (I doubt that one that big was possible--too much
                          >> flexion). After the demise of the 3rd rigid radome on the AN/FPS-24,
                          >> that radar was removed and replaced in situ by an AN/FPS-27, and it
                          >> was covered by an inflatable radome (I think--I wasn't there and
                          >> never saw it) which would have given the site 3 inflatables again."
                          >
                          > A more detailed article about the gear & severe weather there is ,
                          "Recollections of the AN/FPS-24 Radar at Mt Hebo AFS",on the radomes.org
                          website.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                          <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com> , "Steve" <lweatherly4@...> wrote:
                          >>
                          >> Joe - Yes, the "bubble checks" of radar stations goes way back. I also
                          saw bubble checks at Mt Hebo AFS. OR and the plane was an F-89 interceptor
                          a/c that flew between two of our radomes. We were also flown over by a
                          flight of three B-52 bombers about 500 feet above us that came in over the
                          Pacific and then pulled up to just under 4000 feet for the overflight. Mt
                          Hebo AFS was 5 air miles from the Pacific and 3154 feet above sea level.
                          >>
                          >> Mt Hebo AFS was one of many CONUS radar stations operated and maintained
                          by the Air Force during the Cold War. There are photos and documents on AF
                          Radar Stations at www.radomes.org/museum/ . There is a picture of a
                          simulated bubble check at this web site and "The Peacekeepers" book about
                          these radar stations is available at www.afrmaonline.org/ and includes
                          another simulated photo of a "bubble check" at Mt Hebo AFS on the front
                          cover.
                          >>
                          >> The radomes used by the AF were used to protect the radar antenna from
                          adverse weather including high winds and snow. The radomes were either rigid
                          or inflatable and some were huge. At Mt Hebo AFS the largest was a rigid
                          dome about 140 feet in diameter and 100 feet high. It was installed on an
                          FPS-24 search radar tower that itself was 85 feet tall. This tower and
                          radome were easily seen on the horizon and from 50 miles at sea.
                          >>
                          >> Steve Weatherly
                          >> 689th Radar Squadron 65-67
                          >> Mt Hebo AFS, OR
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Kevin Anderson, K9IUA
                          PJ, which frequencies have you been hearing these on? Whenever I try to hear these, I m either listening on the wrong frequencies or not at the right time.
                          Message 12 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            PJ, which frequencies have you been hearing these on? Whenever I try to hear these, I'm either listening on the wrong frequencies or not at the right time. (It probably doesn't help that I am in the central U.S.)

                            Kevin Anderson

                            --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Pj <packy41@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I'm sure some of you still actively monitor the GHFS system but I recently received reports from two friends that last night there was an influx of Skyking messages and one or two stating "weapons are authorized". I believe one of them has a recording of that and awaiting a copy of it.
                            >
                            > Sent from my iPhone
                            >
                          • T&K Christensen
                            HF-GCS High Frequency - Global Comm System (the latest name for what was once HFGS, and SAC Giant Talk). 4724 KHz Nights 6739 KHz Nights 8992 KHz
                            Message 13 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
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                              HF-GCS "High Frequency - Global Comm System" (the latest name for what
                              was once HFGS, and SAC Giant Talk).

                              4724 KHz Nights
                              6739 KHz Nights
                              8992 KHz 24/7
                              11175 KHz 24/7
                              13200 KHz Days
                              15016 KHz Days

                              Best bet is 8992 KHz till mid day, then 15016 KHz till evening, then drop
                              down to 4724 KHz in the dark.

                              You can always use WWV at 5000 KHz, 10000 KHz and 15000 KHz to guage what is
                              working.
                              Andrews, Offutt and McClellan are what you would hear most in the middle of
                              country.

                              They do have a rotating schedule as to when each station uses "night" or
                              "day" frequencies. You'll have to listen to get used to that.

                              Contrary to popular opinion, most of what you would hear is NOT EAMs
                              (Emergency Action Messages), but rather FDMs (Force Direction Messages) and
                              the "SkyKing" messages (a.k.a. Foxtrot messages) are cross authentication
                              messages between NCA capable command platforms. The only time you would
                              hear an EAM is a change in DEFCON, LERTCON or an EWO message. In the last 20
                              years, I know of only two DEFCON changes that have occured. The lowering of
                              DEFCON at the end of the ColdWar was done in the clear for intentional
                              purposes. There are images of that message out on the web.

                              If you get lucky enought to overhear an exercise, you might hear some
                              exercise EAM messages for the Triad. But how you will tell the difference
                              with all the codes???

                              Tim


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Pj
                              It was heard on 11175usb Sent from my iPhone
                              Message 14 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
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                                It was heard on 11175usb

                                Sent from my iPhone

                                On Apr 5, 2013, at 6:47 AM, "Kevin Anderson, K9IUA" <k9iua@...> wrote:

                                > PJ, which frequencies have you been hearing these on? Whenever I try to hear these, I'm either listening on the wrong frequencies or not at the right time. (It probably doesn't help that I am in the central U.S.)
                                >
                                > Kevin Anderson
                                >
                                > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Pj <packy41@...> wrote:
                                >>
                                >> I'm sure some of you still actively monitor the GHFS system but I recently received reports from two friends that last night there was an influx of Skyking messages and one or two stating "weapons are authorized". I believe one of them has a recording of that and awaiting a copy of it.
                                >>
                                >> Sent from my iPhone
                                >>
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------
                                >
                                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                >
                                >
                                >
                              • Box SixteenHundred
                                I do not know about PJ but I have been monitoring 8992 kHz USB and 11175 kHz USB as there has been increased activity. Lots of EAMs and SKYKING messages along
                                Message 15 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
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                                  I do not know about PJ but I have been monitoring 8992 kHz USB and 11175 kHz USB as
                                  there has been increased activity.

                                  Lots of EAMs and SKYKING messages along with other incidental comms.

                                  73 - Bill KA8VIT



                                  > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                                  > From: k9iua@...
                                  > Date: Fri, 5 Apr 2013 12:47:16 +0000
                                  > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Recent N Korea comms
                                  >
                                  > PJ, which frequencies have you been hearing these on? Whenever I try to hear these, I'm either listening on the wrong frequencies or not at the right time. (It probably doesn't help that I am in the central U.S.)
                                  >
                                  > Kevin Anderson
                                  >
                                  > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Pj <packy41@...> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > I'm sure some of you still actively monitor the GHFS system but I recently received reports from two friends that last night there was an influx of Skyking messages and one or two stating "weapons are authorized". I believe one of them has a recording of that and awaiting a copy of it.




                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Box SixteenHundred
                                  I guess the attachments didn t go through. Here are some direct links. http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_01.mp3
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    I guess the attachments didn't go through.

                                    Here are some direct links.

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_01.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_02.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_03.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_04.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_05.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_06.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_08.mp3

                                    http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_10.mp3

                                    73 - Bill KA8VIT



                                    > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                                    > From: box1600@...
                                    > Date: Fri, 5 Apr 2013 13:50:47 -0400
                                    > Subject: RE: [coldwarcomms] Re: Recent N Korea comms
                                    >
                                    > I do not know about PJ but I have been monitoring 8992 kHz USB and 11175 kHz USB as
                                    > there has been increased activity.
                                    >
                                    > Lots of EAMs and SKYKING messages along with other incidental comms.
                                    >
                                    > 73 - Bill KA8VIT



                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Box SixteenHundred
                                    Sorry ! Fat-fingered my own links. Am at work and was rushing. Here are the corrected ones. http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_01.mp3
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Sorry !

                                      Fat-fingered my own links. Am at work and was rushing.

                                      Here are the corrected ones.

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_01.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_02.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_03.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_04.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_05.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_06.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_08.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_10.mp3

                                      73 - Bill KA8VIT

                                      From: box1600@...
                                      To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: RE: [coldwarcomms] Re: Recent N Korea comms
                                      Date: Fri, 5 Apr 2013 14:00:45 -0400




                                      I guess the attachments didn't go through.

                                      Here are some direct links.

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_01.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_02.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_03.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_04.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_05.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_06.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_08.mp3

                                      http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130316_10.mp3

                                      73 - Bill KA8VIT



                                      > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                                      > From: box1600@...
                                      > Date: Fri, 5 Apr 2013 13:50:47 -0400
                                      > Subject: RE: [coldwarcomms] Re: Recent N Korea comms
                                      >
                                      > I do not know about PJ but I have been monitoring 8992 kHz USB and 11175 kHz USB as
                                      > there has been increased activity.
                                      >
                                      > Lots of EAMs and SKYKING messages along with other incidental comms.
                                      >
                                      > 73 - Bill KA8VIT



                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Box SixteenHundred
                                      Sorry ! AGAIN ! http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_01.mp3 http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_02.mp3 http://ka8vit.com/special/8992_20130315_03.mp3
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Apr 5, 2013
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