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Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: Backup for aviation if GPS fails?

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  • Mike Cowen
    Of course there is a -slight- difference between -finding- the airport, and failing to properly pilot your aircraft. There were several inconsistencies with
    Message 1 of 41 , Dec 8, 2012
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      Of course there is a -slight- difference between -finding- the
      airport, and failing to properly pilot your aircraft. There were
      several inconsistencies with that incident, though none of which
      should have precluded adequate situational awareness to avert what
      ultimately took place. However, very interesting to note the various
      audible cockpit alerts were not fed into the pilots' headsets, thus
      blocking out -some- cautionary info. If Mr. Lindbergh had descended
      below 30' AGL without correction en route, the headlines might have
      been -very- different.

      Mike

      At 04:21 PM 12/8/2012, you wrote:

      >And we all know what happened to Air France Flight 296 - Air Bus
      >A320-111 - when the pilot attempted a computer-controlled low-level
      >demonstration flyby at Mulhouse France with 130 passengers aboard...
      >
      >- wa -

      ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Mike Cowen Practice random acts of kindness
      and selfless acts of beauty.
      mcowen@... -Anonymous
    • David
      Scientists have devised a series of novel and inexpensive
      Message 41 of 41 , Dec 14, 2012
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        <http://arstechnica.com/security/2012/12/how-to-bring-down-mission-critical-gps-networks-with-2500/>


        Scientists have devised a series of novel and inexpensive attacks that can
        severely disrupt mission-critical global positioning systems relied on by
        the military and a variety of industrial players, including airlines,
        mining companies, and operators of hydroelectric plants and other critical
        infrastructure.

        Unlike previous GPS attacks, the one developed by a team of scientists from
        Carnegie Mellon University and a private navigation company exploits
        software bugs in the underlying receivers. That allows the attacks to be
        stealthier and more persistent than earlier exploits, which primarily
        relied on signal jamming and spoofing.

        ......
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