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Re: [coldwarcomms] ATT Underground Communications Vaults

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  • Mike Jacobs
    Bruce, There are a number of such sites, and many of the list members here are actively involved in researching them. Some web sites which may be of interest:
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2001
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      Bruce,

      There are a number of such sites, and many of the list members
      here are actively involved in researching them. Some web sites
      which may be of interest:

      My site: http://radio.ee.psu.edu/longlines

      Mark Foster's Site: http://www1.shore.net/~mfoster/LCXR.htm

      Al LaFrance's site: http://coldwardc.homestead.com/files/

      Harold Peach's site: http://www.uky.edu/~hpeach/att/

      All of the above site authors are subscribers to this list and we all
      actively share and enjoy information on former cold war hardened
      communications sites.

      Mike


      Mike Jacobs, N3MJ
      Antenna and RF Engineering Laboratory
      Penn State University
      State College, PA
    • albertjlafrance@cs.com
      Hi Bruce, Yes, AT&T built a number of underground stations on its long-haul coaxial-cable routes during the Cold War. Most were constructed in the mid-late
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 8, 2001
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        Hi Bruce,

        Yes, AT&T built a number of underground stations on its long-haul
        coaxial-cable routes during the Cold War. Most were constructed in the
        mid-late 1960s; the earliest I'm aware of is Monrovia, MD, which opened
        around 1961.

        The sites designated as "main stations" (manned installations with terminal,
        patching, and test facilities) seem to be of a standard design: two levels
        with high ceilings (about 16 ft.), and a mezzanine of lower height on each
        level. They are equipped with blast doors activated by overpressure sensors,
        blast valves to seal all ventilation openings, air-filtration systems,
        engine-alternators sets (typically liquid-fueled combustion turbines) for
        emergency power, and independent water-supply and waste-disposal systems.
        They were stocked with supplies to support Long Lines personnel and their
        families for several weeks.

        Often the cable routes and main stations were placed far enough from major
        cities to offer some protection from a nuclear strike on that city. This
        concept was called "avoidance routing". A microwave radio or coaxial-cable
        "spur line" linked the station to a conventional telephone office in the
        city. Some examples are: Monrovia, MD (west of Baltimore), Dranesville, VA
        (west of DC), Moseley, VA (west of Richmond), and Clarksville, NY (south of
        Albany).

        My Long Lines web page contains information about some of these facilities,
        and links to other pages with additional details:

        http://www.addr.com/~longlines

        In particular, you might be interested in the "Places and Routes" paqe:

        http://www19.addr.com/~longline/places-routes/index.html

        and the "Protection from Nuclear Blasts" heading on the "Documents" page:

        http://www19.addr.com/~longline/documents/index.html

        Albert LaFrance

        In a message dated 11/1/2001 11:18:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        brucem1@... writes:

        > I'm new to coldwarcomms. I'm trying to find information about an ATT
        > Underground Communications Vault in Concordia, Kansas. It was built in the
        > 1960's as a nuclear war-proof communications center. Does anyone know if
        > there were more of these type of underground communications vaults built in
        > other states? I'm wondering if there was an extensive system of these
        > throughout the U.S.. Are there any good websites with this type of
        > information?
      • William Barnes
        Wouldn t the Concordia, KS underground facility have been Fairview? One of the web sites mentions another underground facility having been built west of Kansas
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 8, 2001
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          Wouldn't the Concordia, KS underground facility have been Fairview?

          One of the web sites mentions another underground facility having been built
          west of Kansas City but never used. Anyone know where that relic is/was?

          Bill
          Kansas City KS
        • albertjlafrance@cs.com
          Hi Bruce, From a 1979 route map, it appears that Concordia was a power-feed station on the transcontinental coaxial-cable section between Fairview to the east
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 12, 2001
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            Hi Bruce,

            From a 1979 route map, it appears that Concordia was a power-feed station on
            the transcontinental coaxial-cable section between Fairview to the east and
            Russell [Junction] to the west. That's based on Concordia's location about
            halfway between those stations, and the fact that it has no other cable
            connections and no microwave routes.

            Albert

            In a message dated 11/1/2001 11:18:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            brucem1@... writes:

            > Hi Everyone,
            >
            > I'm new to coldwarcomms. I'm trying to find information about an ATT
            > Underground Communications Vault in Concordia, Kansas. It was built in the
            > 1960's as a nuclear war-proof communications center. Does anyone know if
            > there were more of these type of underground communications vaults built in
            > other states? I'm wondering if there was an extensive system of these
            > throughout the U.S.. Are there any good websites with this type of
            > information?
            >
          • David Lesher
            ... Were the other stations also power-feed stations? I d assume such from the generator plant, etc. but I don t think anyone has said so explicitly. -- A host
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 12, 2001
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              Unnamed Administration sources reported that albertjlafrance@... said:
              >
              > Hi Bruce,
              >
              > >From a 1979 route map, it appears that Concordia was a power-feed station on
              > the transcontinental coaxial-cable section between Fairview to the east and
              > Russell [Junction] to the west. That's based on Concordia's location about
              > halfway between those stations, and the fact that it has no other cable
              > connections and no microwave routes.

              Were the other stations also power-feed stations?

              I'd assume such from the generator plant, etc. but I
              don't think anyone has said so explicitly.




              --
              A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
              & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
              Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
              is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
            • albertjlafrance@cs.com
              As far as I know, yes - the main stations also fed power to their section of the cable. Albert In a message dated 12/12/2001 12:50:44 PM Eastern Standard Time,
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 20, 2001
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                As far as I know, yes - the main stations also fed power to their section of
                the cable.

                Albert

                In a message dated 12/12/2001 12:50:44 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                wb8foz@... writes:

                > Were the other stations also power-feed stations?
                >
                > I'd assume such from the generator plant, etc. but I
                > don't think anyone has said so explicitly.
              • ozob99
                ... section of ... All Main stations were power feed & most,but not all, were protection switching section terminals; L3 fed AC power(up to 2000V) on a loop
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 21, 2001
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                  --- In coldwarcomms@y..., albertjlafrance@c... wrote:
                  > As far as I know, yes - the main stations also fed power to their
                  section of
                  > the cable.

                  All Main stations were power feed & most,but not all, were protection
                  switching section terminals; L3 fed AC power(up to 2000V) on a loop
                  about 1/2 way to the next main, thus leaving 1 repeater span in the
                  middle with no power on the coax; L4 fed DC power(up to about 1200-
                  1500V) and i think it met a gound or opposite polarity from the next
                  Main.

                  L1 & L3 used DC motor driven alternators(505 plants) & later solid
                  state inverters; L4 used DC-DC converters i believe.


                  >
                  > Albert
                  >
                  > In a message dated 12/12/2001 12:50:44 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                  > wb8foz@n... writes:
                  >
                  > > Were the other stations also power-feed stations?
                  > >
                  > > I'd assume such from the generator plant, etc. but I
                  > > don't think anyone has said so explicitly.
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