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Re: DB vs NP

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  • ozob99@yahoo.com
    ... ratios ... 600 ... international ... in ... measure ... controlled ... Perhaps ... chose not to ... My comments(my own & mostly from colleagues more
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 24, 2001
      --- In coldwarcomms@y..., "Bober, David" <boberd@c...> wrote:
      > > American telco tech's have always worked with power & voltage
      ratios
      > > expressed in Decibels(DB), usually referenced to 1 milliwatt in
      600
      > > ohms(DBM)at voice frequencies.However,when working on
      international
      > > circuits, especially private line,they encountered more than a
      > > language barrier; many European countries measure level & power
      in
      > > Nepers(NP),named for Napier,the inventer of logarithms,who often
      > > spelled his name Neper.(1 NP equals 8.685 DB). This was often
      > > frustrating as the foreign countries were not inclined to
      measure
      > > in DB while troubleshooting, their position was the USA
      controlled
      > > the circuit & therefore up to us to convert & determine any level
      > > problems.
      > >
      >
      > As a European (ex-BT) I'd have to say that I always worked in dB.
      Perhaps
      > that's an Anglo-American thing that the "metric" side of Europe
      chose not to
      > adopt.


      My comments(my own & mostly from colleagues more involved than I)
      were really addressing some continent countries such as
      Germany,France,Italy,Spain;and the issues were mainly addressing the
      late 1950's-1970's when the circuits were analog with lots of trouble
      prone toll terminal equipment and carrier systems.


      >
      >
      > > Another impediment to resolving problems overseas was the
      > > bureaucratic & paroichial attitude of the government's Posts &
      > > Telephone/Telegraph(PTT) personnel.They did'nt have the
      dedication to
      > > customer service or sense of proprietorship that AT&T
      had,especially
      > > toward foreign interests.( AT&T was nationalized briefly in WW
      1,but
      > > kept the incumbent personnel thank goodness).
      > >
      > >
      > I was third generation GPO/BT. I'd say that in Britain we had the
      same
      > "family business" tradition as AT&T, and *certainly* the same pride
      and
      > professionalism in our network. By way of modern comparisson, I'd
      also say
      > that standards at both AT&T and BT have dropped considerably since
      > respective deregulation.


      I would agree since I never heard any significant negative
      experiences with the UK;and standards have indeed been dropped since
      then;one would think with the competition customer service should be
      paramount,but cost cutting compromises everything.



      >
      >
      > > Compounding overseas troubleshooting was the wide variety of
      > > unfamiliar carrier & terminal equipment in foreign countries, so
      our
      > > techs were unable to guide,prompt or assist an incompetant or
      novice
      > > tech as they could in the USA.
      > >
      > >
      > An incompetent engineer is an incompetent engineer, whatever his
      > nationality. I suspect some of this may have been more a question
      of the
      > language barrier, rather than a technical one. My last
      international project
      > with BT was working on putting a cable through the service tunnel
      of the
      > Channel Tunnel. You could fit my knowledge of the French language
      onto the
      > back of a postage stamp. How we ever managed to measure the loss on
      those
      > pairs is still a complete mystery!



      This is true & we had our fair share of incompetance;but my point was
      that one can walk such a person through testing,patching
      off,adjusting,and work arounds to restore service, if the equipment &
      carrier was known to you; if it was not you were in the dark and had
      to wait until someone at the distant end could fix the problem.


      BTW my 1st experience with a UK service was in 1957 when Queen
      Elizabeth visited Williamsburg,Va; a Morse telegraph circuit was
      ordered for a news agency(maybe one of the last Morse services)
      covering the event.I was'nt involved with the circuit itself but
      assigned to assemble a key & sounder on a board sent to the site.
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