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Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T Jax Beach

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  • David Lesher
    ... Glad you mentioned the 2nd; it s the only one that matters. Note 809 only handled HALF of Hispanoiola. And did NOT handle all places; like Martinique. ...
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 16, 2001
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      Unnamed Administration sources reported that dsandow@... said:
      >
      > 809 consisted of all the islands in the Caribbean from Aruba to
      > Jamaica (EXCEPT Cuba), and the Bahamas (marginally Caribbean) and
      > Bermuda (mid-ocean). Cuba was excluded because it was manual only -
      > they didn't have any $$ to buy dial switches (and also cold-war
      > politics).

      Glad you mentioned the 2nd; it's the only one that matters.

      Note 809 only handled HALF of Hispanoiola. And did NOT
      handle all places; like Martinique.

      > Belize (British Honduras) was not in the 809 area code for 2 reasons.
      > 1. It is on the 'mainland' of Central America, so it is defined by the
      > CCITT as being is World Zone 2 - hence international from the USA.
      > Only WZ1 places are in the NADP. 2. There were no cable/satellite
      > circuits to Belize until after 1974. The only service until then was
      > short wave (HF) radio - hence manual operators, no dial, and no area
      > code.


      I seem to recall there was ONE place in C.A. that was part of
      {correct} 809. Yes, it was an exception.


      --
      A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
      & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
      Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
      is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
    • David Lesher
      ... As I recall, it was the feed from downtown to Florida City that Andrew did in... -- A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com &
      Message 2 of 20 , Oct 16, 2001
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        Unnamed Administration sources reported that Mark Foster said:
        >
        > See the notes at the bottom of: http://users.shore.net/~mfoster/Florida_City.htm

        As I recall, it was the feed from downtown to Florida City that
        Andrew did in...



        --
        A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
        & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
        Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
        is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
      • ozob99@yahoo.com
        ... and ... The Key West-Havana cable(rubber & gutta-percha) dates from 1921 and the terminal repeater in the Key West CO was a modified Reading type(so
        Message 3 of 20 , Oct 16, 2001
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          --- In coldwarcomms@y..., kb9yku <kb9yku@h...> wrote:
          > At 12:58 PM 10/16/01 -0400, you wrote:
          > ><<Cuba was excluded because it was manual only -
          > >they didn't have any $$ to buy dial switches (and also cold-war
          > >politics). The manual circuits were handled by operators at Miami
          and
          > >NY through a very old (late '30s?) cable from Key West.>>



          The Key West-Havana cable(rubber & gutta-percha) dates from 1921 and
          the terminal repeater in the Key West CO was a modified "Reading"
          type(so named from it's initial use in Reading,Pa); I saw them in 1957
          while visiting the office,each mounted on a panel about 2-3 feet
          square,using the WeCo 100 series "tennis ball" tubes.

          I was also in NAS Guantanimo Bay in 1958 and there were 3 LD circuits
          out of the base CO on open wire Lynch carrier(equivelent to WeCo C
          cxr).It took about 20-30 minutes to get a manual call in to the
          US,with a 5 minute limit.



          > >
          > >Just curious but were the lines to Cuba ever taken out of
          operation, or is
          > >it still possible to call Cuba directly today?
          >
          > a year or two i got on a website that was in cuba at the navy
          base.
          > they sayed it was using a old under sea cable .
          > and itr was like using a 300 bps modem
          > sorry for tilling my age knowing what a 300 bps modem was
          > i was paying compuserv system 27 cents a minit for use back
          wane a
          > vic-20 was still sold at stores like Kmart
        • ozob99@yahoo.com
          ... Miami ... 1957 ... circuits ... I forgot to list these URL s with info/history on submarine cables: http://www.atlantic-cable.com/ http://www.iscpc.org/
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 16, 2001
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            --- In coldwarcomms@y..., ozob99@y... wrote:
            > --- In coldwarcomms@y..., kb9yku <kb9yku@h...> wrote:
            > > At 12:58 PM 10/16/01 -0400, you wrote:
            > > ><<Cuba was excluded because it was manual only -
            > > >they didn't have any $$ to buy dial switches (and also cold-war
            > > >politics). The manual circuits were handled by operators at
            Miami
            > and
            > > >NY through a very old (late '30s?) cable from Key West.>>
            >
            >
            >
            > The Key West-Havana cable(rubber & gutta-percha) dates from 1921 and
            > the terminal repeater in the Key West CO was a modified "Reading"
            > type(so named from it's initial use in Reading,Pa); I saw them in
            1957
            > while visiting the office,each mounted on a panel about 2-3 feet
            > square,using the WeCo 100 series "tennis ball" tubes.
            >
            > I was also in NAS Guantanimo Bay in 1958 and there were 3 LD
            circuits
            > out of the base CO on open wire Lynch carrier(equivelent to WeCo C
            > cxr).It took about 20-30 minutes to get a manual call in to the
            > US,with a 5 minute limit.


            I forgot to list these URL's with info/history on submarine cables:

            http://www.atlantic-cable.com/

            http://www.iscpc.org/







            >
            >
            >
            > > >
            > > >Just curious but were the lines to Cuba ever taken out of
            > operation, or is
            > > >it still possible to call Cuba directly today?
            > >
            > > a year or two i got on a website that was in cuba at the navy
            > base.
            > > they sayed it was using a old under sea cable .
            > > and itr was like using a 300 bps modem
            > > sorry for tilling my age knowing what a 300 bps modem was
            > > i was paying compuserv system 27 cents a minit for use back
            > wane a
            > > vic-20 was still sold at stores like Kmart
          • dsandow@garden.net
            ... Thanks for the correction ... As late as 1972 (and possibly later), Gitmo was served (commercial) via HF radio. There may also be USN cables before or
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 18, 2001
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              --- In coldwarcomms@y..., ozob99@y... wrote:
              > --- In coldwarcomms@y..., ozob99@y... wrote:
              > > --- In coldwarcomms@y..., kb9yku <kb9yku@h...> wrote:
              > > > At 12:58 PM 10/16/01 -0400, you wrote:
              > > > ><<Cuba was excluded because it was manual only -
              > > > >they didn't have any $$ to buy dial switches (and also cold-war
              > > > >politics). The manual circuits were handled by operators at
              > Miami
              > > and
              > > > >NY through a very old (late '30s?) cable from Key West.>>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > The Key West-Havana cable(rubber & gutta-percha) dates from 1921

              Thanks for the correction

              > > I was also in NAS Guantanimo Bay in 1958 and there were 3 LD
              > circuits
              > > out of the base CO on open wire Lynch carrier(equivelent to WeCo C
              > > cxr).It took about 20-30 minutes to get a manual call in to the
              > > US,with a 5 minute limit.
              >

              As late as 1972 (and possibly later), Gitmo was served (commercial)
              via HF radio. There may also be USN cables before or since that date,
              but ATT did not use them for commercial traffic. Dunno.

              > > > >Just curious but were the lines to Cuba ever taken out of
              > > operation, or is
              > > > >it still possible to call Cuba directly today?

              http://www.iscpc.org/cabledb/caribbean.htm
            • hooligan@aol.com
              In a message dated 10/18/2001 9:51:28 AM Eastern Daylight Time, dsandow@garden.net writes: ... The HF links continued on until the early 1980s -- perhaps 1984
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 18, 2001
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                In a message dated 10/18/2001 9:51:28 AM Eastern Daylight Time, dsandow@... writes:


                As late as 1972 (and possibly later), Gitmo was served (commercial)
                via HF radio. There may also be USN cables before or since that date,
                but ATT did not use them for commercial traffic. Dunno.


                    The HF links continued on until the early 1980s -- perhaps 1984 or so at the latest.

                  Tuning that in was a good source of amusement for me as I was in high school.  Most of the calls were from the Marines at Gitmo, back to family members.   It was kinda funny to hear the way some of the young Marines would 'compartmentalize' things -- they'd tell their mom that everything was great & they were doing well, they'd complain to their dad about how being "trapped" at Gitmo was kinda boring and that they wanted to get out of the Corps, they'd tell their brother or best friends about sexual conquests (or lack thereof), and then of course they'd tell their girlfriends how much they missed them, and were totally devoted to them, etc.   All in the space of about half an hour.     Very enlightening regarding the ways of the world...


                  TIm

              • Ralf
                ... Hello, the HF R/T link between AAC&R Guantanamo and AT&T NY has been last heard 20 years ago -- I have no reports seen after 1981. Common frequencies were
                Message 7 of 20 , Oct 18, 2001
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                  hooligan@... wrote:

                  > dsandow@... writes:
                  >
                  > As late as 1972 (and possibly later), Gitmo was served (commercial)
                  > via HF radio. There may also be USN cables before or since that date,
                  > but ATT did not use them for commercial traffic. Dunno.
                  >
                  > The HF links continued on until the early 1980s -- perhaps 1984 or
                  > so at the latest.


                  Hello,

                  the HF R/T link between AAC&R Guantanamo and AT&T NY has been last
                  heard 20 years ago -- I have no reports seen after 1981.
                  Common frequencies were 10222, 11130, 13750, 13765 kHz for Guantanamo
                  (callsign NAW..) and 13612 14540 for New York, using a system of 4x
                  voice channels (4x3 = 12 kHz width) per frequency.
                  The GTMO's transmitters were 10 kW into LP antennae, and a verification
                  card received back in 1976 was signed by Gerhard Seck (KG4FI) on behalf
                  of "ITT All American Cables and Radio, Inc.".

                  73!
                • khoehn@ismi.net
                  I made a point of visiting the cable head when I was in Key West a few years ago. You can look through a small hold into a small building (about 5 square) and
                  Message 8 of 20 , Oct 18, 2001
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                    I made a point of visiting the cable head when I was in Key West a few
                    years ago.

                    You can look through a small hold into a small building (about 5' square)
                    and see the cable's remnants within. It's located next to a vase-shaped
                    marker announcing the location as the most southernmost point in the US.


                    KWH


                    > > >politics). The manual circuits were handled by operators at

                    > Miami
                    > > and
                    > > > >NY through a very old (late '30s?) cable from Key
                    West.>>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > The Key West-Havana cable(rubber & gutta-percha) dates from 1921
                  • albertjlafrance@cs.com
                    Cool! Are there any signs on the building, or cable markers in the area? Albert In a message dated 10/18/2001 5:16:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                    Message 9 of 20 , Oct 18, 2001
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                      Cool! Are there any signs on the building, or cable markers in the area?

                      Albert

                      In a message dated 10/18/2001 5:16:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                      khoehn@... writes:

                      > I made a point of visiting the cable head when I was in Key West a few
                      > years ago.
                      >
                      > You can look through a small hold into a small building (about 5' square)
                      > and see the cable's remnants within. It's located next to a vase-shaped
                      > marker announcing the location as the most southernmost point in the US.
                      >
                      >
                      > KWH
                    • albertjlafrance@cs.com
                      Thanks for the web references; those are very informative sites. I had no idea that so much information was available on the topic! Here s another which might
                      Message 10 of 20 , Oct 18, 2001
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                        Thanks for the web references; those are very informative sites. I had no
                        idea that so much information was available on the topic!

                        Here's another which might be of interest - a history of telecommunications
                        in Cuba:

                        http://www.vii.org/papers/cuba.htm

                        Albert

                        In a message dated 10/16/2001 10:42:24 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                        ozob99@... writes:

                        > I forgot to list these URL's with info/history on submarine cables:
                        >
                        > http://www.atlantic-cable.com/
                        >
                        > http://www.iscpc.org/
                      • ozob99@yahoo.com
                        ... had no ... telecommunications ... I m surprised the 1921 cable to Key West is nt mentioned in the paper;it was significant in it s day.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Oct 19, 2001
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                          --- In coldwarcomms@y..., albertjlafrance@c... wrote:
                          > Thanks for the web references; those are very informative sites. I
                          had no
                          > idea that so much information was available on the topic!
                          >
                          > Here's another which might be of interest - a history of
                          telecommunications
                          > in Cuba:
                          >
                          > http://www.vii.org/papers/cuba.htm
                          >
                          > Albert


                          I'm surprised the 1921 cable to Key West is'nt mentioned in the
                          paper;it was significant in it's day.




                          >
                          > In a message dated 10/16/2001 10:42:24 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                          > ozob99@y... writes:
                          >
                          > > I forgot to list these URL's with info/history on submarine
                          cables:
                          > >
                          > > http://www.atlantic-cable.com/
                          > >
                          > > http://www.iscpc.org/
                        • Ken Hoehn
                          I don t recall any cable markers, but I think I recall a sign on the door; poor shape. The best way to find it is to get directions to that most southern
                          Message 12 of 20 , Oct 19, 2001
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                            I don't recall any cable markers, but I think I recall a sign on the door; poor
                            shape.

                            The best way to find it is to get directions to that 'most southern place in the
                            US' marker. It's on the tourist maps. The building is near the road, and it's
                            about 100 yards or so to the water, if I recall correctly.

                            KWH

                            albertjlafrance@... wrote:

                            > Cool! Are there any signs on the building, or cable markers in the area?
                            >
                            > Albert
                            >
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