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Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

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  • Blake Bowers
    NYSEMO did not exist, but its fore runner did, NYSOCD New York State Office of Civil Defense. Don t take your organs to heaven, heaven knows we need them down
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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      NYSEMO did not exist, but its fore runner did, NYSOCD New York State Office
      of Civil Defense.


      Don't take your organs to heaven,
      heaven knows we need them down here!
      Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Craig Scott" <dredmlm@...>
      To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 9:10 AM
      Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study


      Very interesting.....does anyone know where, other than AF bases, where
      these bomb sensors were located? I see Albany NY listed as a location. Maybe
      the Watervliet Arsenal? I don't think NYSEMO office existed in the 60's. Not
      much else around here for locations.
      Thanks,
      Craig
      Watervliet NY


      ________________________________
      From: Phil Sp <philsp2006@...>
      To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 9:20 PM
      Subject: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

      Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
      alarm system:

      http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf

      Phil


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    • OZOB99
      ... Check the archives for bomb alarm & NUDETS, I think some URL s were listed with details, or google the two terms BTW the more I think about it I believe
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Craig Scott <dredmlm@...> wrote:
        >
        > Very interesting.....does anyone know where, other than AF bases, where these bomb sensors were located?  I see Albany NY listed as a location.  Maybe the Watervliet Arsenal?  I don't think NYSEMO office existed in the 60's.  Not much else around here for locations.
        > Thanks,
        > Craig
        > Watervliet NY 


        Check the archives for bomb alarm & NUDETS, I think some URL's were listed with details, or google the two terms

        BTW the more I think about it I believe there a few WU WG circuits on the Select Circuit list, most likely because these circuits were on the VFCT; aside from this and parts of Autodin,I don't recall any other top priority critical circuits/networks that WU carried.

        Thats another topic worth exploring: what were any other really critical circuits/networks that WU carried? My old WU contacts are deceased & I have'nt asked in any of the WU alumni forums.

        Perhaps someone in the group has some info or WU contacts on this.
      • jerrybeck
        To WU personnel not actually involved with the sensors, they were all referred to as classified location. However, I do know some were located at WU
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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          To WU personnel not actually involved with the sensors, they were all referred to as
          classified location. However, I do know some were located at WU microwave
          sites. Other locations on the east coast were at the various FEOs and FEOCs,
          where WU would also have a presence. That’s probably one reason the trouble calls
          usually referred to classified location. They could have been in plain site in large cities,
          but were probably in the area where other facilities existed.

          From: Craig Scott
          Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 10:10 AM
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study


          Very interesting.....does anyone know where, other than AF bases, where these bomb sensors were located? I see Albany NY listed as a location. Maybe the Watervliet Arsenal? I don't think NYSEMO office existed in the 60's. Not much else around here for locations.
          Thanks,
          Craig
          Watervliet NY

          ________________________________
          From: Phil Sp <mailto:philsp2006%40gmail.com>
          To: mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 9:20 PM
          Subject: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

          Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
          alarm system:

          http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf

          Phil

          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 2102/4056 - Release Date: 12/04/11


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        • Craig Scott
          I was born and raised here and I don t remember a WU office of any kind.  Maybe a telegraph office in downtown Albany.  I suppose the sensor could have been
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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            I was born and raised here and I don't remember a WU office of any kind.  Maybe a telegraph office in downtown Albany.  I suppose the sensor could have been on the roof.
            Craig
            Watervliet NY  


            ________________________________
            From: jerrybeck <jerrybeck@...>
            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 1:17 PM
            Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

            To WU personnel not actually involved with the sensors, they were all referred to as
            classified location.  However, I do  know some were located at WU microwave
            sites.  Other locations  on the east coast were at the various FEOs and FEOCs,
            where WU would also have a presence.  That’s probably one reason the trouble calls
            usually referred to classified location.  They could have been in plain site in large cities,
            but were probably in the area where other facilities existed.

            From: Craig Scott
            Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 10:10 AM
            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

             
            Very interesting.....does anyone know where, other than AF bases, where these bomb sensors were located?  I see Albany NY listed as a location.  Maybe the Watervliet Arsenal?  I don't think NYSEMO office existed in the 60's.  Not much else around here for locations.
            Thanks,
            Craig
            Watervliet NY

            ________________________________
            From: Phil Sp <mailto:philsp2006%40gmail.com>
            To: mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 9:20 PM
            Subject: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

            Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
            alarm system:

            http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf

            Phil

            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 2102/4056 - Release Date: 12/04/11


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          • John K Scoggin Jr
            We had a WU microwave tower north of Wilmington DE (Ebright Azimuth). All they would have needed was a couple of wires attached to the leg to determine which
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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              We had a WU microwave tower north of Wilmington DE (Ebright Azimuth). All
              they would have needed was a couple of wires attached to the leg to
              determine which way the tower fell when the big one hit Wilmington or
              Philly. :-)

              The tower is still there and heavily used by the local amateur community.

              john

              _____

              From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Craig Scott
              Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 2:26 PM
              To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study




              I was born and raised here and I don't remember a WU office of any kind.
              Maybe a telegraph office in downtown Albany. I suppose the sensor could
              have been on the roof.
              Craig
              Watervliet NY

              ________________________________
              From: jerrybeck <jerrybeck@...
              <mailto:jerrybeck%40northstate.net> >
              To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 1:17 PM
              Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

              To WU personnel not actually involved with the sensors, they were all
              referred to as
              classified location. However, I do know some were located at WU microwave
              sites. Other locations on the east coast were at the various FEOs and
              FEOCs,
              where WU would also have a presence. That's probably one reason the trouble
              calls
              usually referred to classified location. They could have been in plain site
              in large cities,
              but were probably in the area where other facilities existed.

              From: Craig Scott
              Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 10:10 AM
              To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study


              Very interesting.....does anyone know where, other than AF bases, where
              these bomb sensors were located? I see Albany NY listed as a location.
              Maybe the Watervliet Arsenal? I don't think NYSEMO office existed in the
              60's. Not much else around here for locations.
              Thanks,
              Craig
              Watervliet NY

              ________________________________
              From: Phil Sp <mailto:philsp2006%40gmail.com>
              To: mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 9:20 PM
              Subject: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

              Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
              alarm system:

              http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf

              Phil

              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ----------------------------------------------------------

              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 2102/4056 - Release Date: 12/04/11

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            • jerrybeck
              I didn’t mean to imply that they were located at WU offices. More likely at locations where WU also had other services-government locations, law enforcement
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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                I didn’t mean to imply that they were located at WU offices. More likely at locations
                where WU also had other services-government locations, law enforcement offices,
                etc. At the time this system was in existence, WU carried quite a bit of government
                traffic.


                >Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 2:25 PM
                >To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study
                >I was born and raised here and I don't remember a WU office of any kind. Maybe a telegraph office in downtown Albany. I suppose the sensor could have been on the roof.
                >Craig
                >Watervliet NY


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Craig Scott
                OK, understood.  Thanks, Jerry! ________________________________ From: jerrybeck To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday,
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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                  OK, understood.  Thanks, Jerry!


                  ________________________________
                  From: jerrybeck <jerrybeck@...>
                  To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 4:44 PM
                  Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study

                  I didn’t mean to imply that they were located at WU offices. More likely at locations
                  where WU also had other services-government locations, law enforcement offices,
                  etc. At the time this system was in existence, WU carried quite a bit of government
                  traffic.


                  >Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 2:25 PM
                  >To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study
                  >I was born and raised here and I don't remember a WU office of any kind. Maybe a telegraph office in downtown Albany. I suppose the sensor could have been on the roof.
                  >Craig
                  >Watervliet NY


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • OZOB99
                  The sensor could be hundreds of miles away from a WU CO; they leased local & toll telegraph grade lines(DC) from Bell/ICO/LL into their CO s; a typical
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 5, 2011
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                    The sensor could be hundreds of miles away from a WU CO; they leased local & toll telegraph grade lines(DC) from Bell/ICO/LL into their CO's; a typical commercial Bell circuit ID in VA would have been 8WUxxxx.



                    --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Craig Scott <dredmlm@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I was born and raised here and I don't remember a WU office of any kind.  Maybe a telegraph office in downtown Albany.  I suppose the sensor could have been on the roof.
                    > Craig
                    > Watervliet NY  
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: jerrybeck <jerrybeck@...>
                    > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Monday, December 5, 2011 1:17 PM
                    > Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study
                    >
                    > To WU personnel not actually involved with the sensors, they were all referred to as
                    > classified location.  However, I do  know some were located at WU microwave
                    > sites.  Other locations  on the east coast were at the various FEOs and FEOCs,
                    > where WU would also have a presence.  That’s probably one reason the trouble calls
                    > usually referred to classified location.  They could have been in plain site in large cities,
                    > but were probably in the area where other facilities existed.
                    >
                    > From: Craig Scott
                    > Sent: Monday, December 05, 2011 10:10 AM
                    > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study
                    >
                    >  
                    > Very interesting.....does anyone know where, other than AF bases, where these bomb sensors were located?  I see Albany NY listed as a location.  Maybe the Watervliet Arsenal?  I don't think NYSEMO office existed in the 60's.  Not much else around here for locations.
                    > Thanks,
                    > Craig
                    > Watervliet NY
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Phil Sp <mailto:philsp2006%40gmail.com>
                    > To: mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Sunday, December 4, 2011 9:20 PM
                    > Subject: [coldwarcomms] 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study
                    >
                    > Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
                    > alarm system:
                    >
                    > http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf
                    >
                    > Phil
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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                    > No virus found in this message.
                    > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    > Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 2102/4056 - Release Date: 12/04/11
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                    >
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                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
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                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • BobS
                    FYI, the Wikipedia reference to the UK equivalent of DTIC. Images and other information can be found by Googling AWDREY . Atomic Weapons Detection Recognition
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 7, 2011
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                      FYI, the Wikipedia reference to the UK equivalent of DTIC. Images and other information can be found by Googling "AWDREY".


                      Atomic Weapons Detection Recognition and Estimation of Yield

                      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from AWDREY)

                      Front panel of an AWDREY display unit, showing the twin digital displays and the hardcopy printout.

                      Atomic Weapons Detection Recognition and Estimation of Yield known by the acronym AWDREY was a desk-mounted automatic detection instrument, located at most, but not all, of the 25 Royal Observer Corps (ROC) controls, across the United Kingdom, during the Cold War. The instruments would have detected any nuclear explosions and indicated the estimated size in megatons.

                      With the display unit mounted in a 3-foot-high (0.91 m) steel cabinet, the system operated by measuring the level of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) generated by any nuclear explosion. The instruments were in operation 24/7/365 between 1955 and 1992 and tested daily by full-time ROC officers.

                      AWDREY regularly reacted to the EMP from lightning strikes during thunderstorms. [1] Additional AWDREY instruments were also installed at most of the Regional Government Heaquarters (RGHQs) and at UKRAOC at RAF High Wycombe

                      AWDREY was designed, built and maintained by the Atomic Weapons Establishment at Aldermaston and tested for performance and accuracy on real nuclear explosions at the 1957 Kiritimati (or Christmas Island) nuclear bomb test (after being mounted on board a ship). Although a single AWDREY unit could not differentiate between the EMP from a nuclear explosion and a lightning strike, the units were installed sufficiently far apart that a lightning strike would not simultaneously register on two adjacent AWDREYs.

                      The first two primary responsibilities of the United Kingdom Warning and Monitoring Organisation (UKWMO), for whom the ROC provided the field force were:

                      AWDREY was the principal method by which the UKWMO would achieve its second responsibility. Simultaneous responses on two or more AWDREY units would identify the explosion as a nuclear strike.

                      ROC post bomb detection instruments (see Bomb Power Indicator ) operated by recording the pressure of the blast wave from any nearby nuclear explosion. Any ultra-high-altitude nuclear explosion, designed to knock out the UK's communications and electronic equipment would not produce a detectable blast wave, and the AWDREY system was therefore the only method of identifying these bursts.

                      The AWDREY installation consisted of three separate elements: the sensor, the detection unit and the display cabinet. The sensor was mounted on the roof of the building under a polycarbonate protective cover. The detection unit was installed in a special room that was enclosed inside a Faraday cage; in the case of the Royal Observer Corps controls, this was the "Radio Room" that already protected the sensitive radio equipment from the effects of EMP.

                      The display unit (shown in the photograph above) could be mounted anywhere in the building – at ROC controls this was usually on the balcony adjacent to the Triangulation Team. The three elements of the installation were connected by EMP-shielded and heavy duty cabling.

                      During the early phase of operations, a spare observer was required to stand next to the display unit and monitor it constantly to identify initial responses. Once a nuclear strike on the UK had been confirmed by the Director UKWMO (or his deputy), readings from AWDREY were ignored during subsequent nuclear bursts within the attack, and the readings from ROC posts became the main method of detecting and identifying any subsequent near ground bursts.

                      Royal Observer Corps reports following a reading on AWDREY were prefixed with the codeword "TOCSIN BANG". The message would also include the three letter group identifier, followed by the time and yield reading from the AWDREY printout. Eg "TOCSIN BANG – CAR – 11.06 (hours) – 3 megatons" (in this example with CAR relating to the Carlisle control).


                      .
                    • OZOB99
                      ... Here s some major WU gov t contracts in 1961: snippet from this 1961 FCC doc
                      Message 10 of 17 , Dec 11, 2011
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                        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > BTW the more I think about it I believe there a few WU WG circuits on the Select Circuit list, most likely because these circuits were on the VFCT; aside from this and parts of Autodin,I don't recall any other top priority critical circuits/networks that WU carried.
                        >
                        > Thats another topic worth exploring: what were any other really critical circuits/networks that WU carried? My old WU contacts are deceased & I have'nt asked in any of the WU alumni forums.
                        >
                        > Perhaps someone in the group has some info or WU contacts on this.


                        Here's some major WU gov't contracts in 1961:

                        snippet from this 1961 FCC doc

                        http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2011/db0727/DOC-308685A1.txt



                        "Among Western Union installations for the Government during the
                        year was a network connecting satellite tracking stations and a facsim
                        ile system for speeding weather maps to 650 points throughout the
                        Nation. It is also extending its bomb alarm system on the eastern sea
                        board to a nationwide network, and completing a logistics network to
                        connect 450 Air Force bases, and other installations"

                        Searches for WU in the FCC Annual reports for other years may yield further info on circuit activity.
                      • etaoin_shrdlu_00
                        ... At one time WU had a modern microwave network over most of the country and could provide very high bandwidth facilities when Bell couldn t. I did some
                        Message 11 of 17 , Dec 11, 2011
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                          > Thats another topic worth exploring: what were any other really
                          > critical circuits/networks that WU carried? My old WU contacts are
                          > deceased & I have'nt asked in any of the WU alumni forums.

                          At one time WU had a modern microwave network over most of the country and could provide very high bandwidth facilities when Bell couldn't. I did some research on a path from Pillar Point (Air Force station) just south of San Francisco to Vandenberg AFB some hundreds of miles south. Test missiles launched from Vandenberg could be imaged by several AF-operated optical tracking stations on the coast, and the tracking radar and telemetry receiver at Pillar Point sent its signals back to Vandenberg over the WU circuit, which had about ten hops (sharing a segment of the main north-south route in California.) The equipment was Raytheon KTR analog radio. When the sites were sold to American Tower, some clever and intrepid ATC techs kept the circuit running (and the contract paying) for quite a few years. Various pieces of gear were replaced and many of the KTRs changed out to NEC commercial microwave. The circuit was turned down a couple of years ago when the USAF's contractor operating the test range was finally able to get a redundant circuit from at&t, including new microwave at the north end.

                          The WU route maps are available in various places online; you can figure out what routes probably didn't have a lot of telegram traffic.

                          --
                          David Josephson
                          > >
                          > > Perhaps someone in the group has some info or WU contacts on this.
                          >
                          >
                          > Here's some major WU gov't contracts in 1961:
                          >
                          > snippet from this 1961 FCC doc
                          >
                          > http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2011/db0727/DOC-308685A1.txt
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > "Among Western Union installations for the Government during the
                          > year was a network connecting satellite tracking stations and a facsim
                          > ile system for speeding weather maps to 650 points throughout the
                          > Nation. It is also extending its bomb alarm system on the eastern sea
                          > board to a nationwide network, and completing a logistics network to
                          > connect 450 Air Force bases, and other installations"
                          >
                          > Searches for WU in the FCC Annual reports for other years may yield further info on circuit activity.
                          >
                        • jerrybeck
                          Actually, WU had several “dedicated” microwave systems. Telegram traffic was a very minor part of the traffic carried over the WU MW systems. This was
                          Message 12 of 17 , Dec 11, 2011
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                            Actually, WU had several “dedicated” microwave systems. Telegram traffic was a very minor part of
                            the traffic carried over the WU MW systems. This was also a time when Telex/TWX was a good part of
                            their proprietary traffic. There was also the GSA Advanced Record System, the NCIC system for
                            law enforcement and quite a bit of other government traffic besides BX and the DOD and WHCA
                            commitments.

                            From: etaoin_shrdlu_00
                            Sent: Monday, December 12, 2011 1:01 AM
                            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [coldwarcomms] Western Union Gov't Contracts(was Re: 1964 DTIC bomb alarm study)



                            > Thats another topic worth exploring: what were any other really
                            > critical circuits/networks that WU carried? My old WU contacts are
                            > deceased & I have'nt asked in any of the WU alumni forums.

                            At one time WU had a modern microwave network over most of the country and could provide very high bandwidth facilities when Bell couldn't. I did some research on a path from Pillar Point (Air Force station) just south of San Francisco to Vandenberg AFB some hundreds of miles south. Test missiles launched from Vandenberg could be imaged by several AF-operated optical tracking stations on the coast, and the tracking radar and telemetry receiver at Pillar Point sent its signals back to Vandenberg over the WU circuit, which had about ten hops (sharing a segment of the main north-south route in California.) The equipment was Raytheon KTR analog radio. When the sites were sold to American Tower, some clever and intrepid ATC techs kept the circuit running (and the contract paying) for quite a few years. Various pieces of gear were replaced and many of the KTRs changed out to NEC commercial microwave. The circuit was turned down a couple of years ago when the USAF's contractor operating the test range was finally able to get a redundant circuit from at&t, including new microwave at the north end.

                            The WU route maps are available in various places online; you can figure out what routes probably didn't have a lot of telegram traffic.

                            --
                            David Josephson
                            > >
                            > > Perhaps someone in the group has some info or WU contacts on this.
                            >
                            >
                            > Here's some major WU gov't contracts in 1961:
                            >
                            > snippet from this 1961 FCC doc
                            >
                            > http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2011/db0727/DOC-308685A1.txt
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > "Among Western Union installations for the Government during the
                            > year was a network connecting satellite tracking stations and a facsim
                            > ile system for speeding weather maps to 650 points throughout the
                            > Nation. It is also extending its bomb alarm system on the eastern sea
                            > board to a nationwide network, and completing a logistics network to
                            > connect 450 Air Force bases, and other installations"
                            >
                            > Searches for WU in the FCC Annual reports for other years may yield further info on circuit activity.
                            >




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                          • OZOB99
                            A related 1963 paper on detector tests: http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=AD0343196&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jul 16, 2012
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                              A related 1963 paper on detector tests:

                              http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=AD0343196&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf




                              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Phil Sp <philsp2006@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
                              > alarm system:
                              >
                              > http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf
                              >
                              > Phil
                              >
                            • BobS
                              If you re interested in the UK equivalent of this system, Google AWDREY . The wiki entry is at
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jul 17, 2012
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                                If you're interested in the UK equivalent of this system, Google "AWDREY".

                                The wiki entry is at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_Weapons_Detection_Recognition_and_Estimation_of_Yield


                                Bob

                                --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > A related 1963 paper on detector tests:
                                >
                                > http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=AD0343196&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Phil Sp <philsp2006@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Just posted on governmentattic, a declassified 1964 study on the bomb
                                > > alarm system:
                                > >
                                > > http://www.governmentattic.org/5docs/BombAlarmSystemStudy_1964.pdf
                                > >
                                > > Phil
                                > >
                                >
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