Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [coldwarcomms] Digest Number 3886

Expand Messages
  • Doug Humphrey
    ... yes and yes 11,000 RPM is about right and yes, just as turbines have a huge appetite for fuel, they have just as huge an appetite for air. no way they
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 30, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      On Nov 30, 2011, at 11:03 AM, coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > Try 11,000 RPM, I bet.
      >
      > I'd assume they consumed unfiltered air and got contaminated. I can't
      > imagine the size HEPA filters you would need to supply that kind of CFM
      > with low pressure drop.

      yes and yes

      11,000 RPM is about right and yes, just as turbines
      have a huge appetite for fuel, they have just as huge
      an appetite for air.

      no way they filtered the inlet air; the turbines would
      just be eating raw outside air, and blowing it back outside
      and yes, it would result in making the gensets contaminated
      with radioactive fallout - but they would still function correctly,
      the radioactive contamination not having any effect on their
      operations.

      I have experience with turbines in a bunch of different uses,
      and the amount of air that they pull is ASTOUNDING.

      A big engine (GE J79 for example) is eating 150 pounds of air
      a second. most people think "PSI" - but that is not this - this is
      150 pounds of air by weight per second, or roughly all of the
      air in a small building, per second....

      The solar is a lot smaller than a J79, but that just means that
      it would eat all of the air in a building in 5 seconds ;-)

      fun things they are!
      doug
    • David
      ... At 0.076 lbs/ft^3 [70F], that s ~2000 ft^3/sec. Doug at one point owned an engine; was that a J79 or something else? Speaking of surplus; I just found out
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 30, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        On 11/30/11 11:20 AM, Doug Humphrey wrote:

        > A big engine (GE J79 for example) is eating 150 pounds of air
        > a second. most people think "PSI" - but that is not this - this is
        > 150 pounds of air by weight per second, or roughly all of the
        > air in a small building, per second....

        At 0.076 lbs/ft^3 [70F], that's ~2000 ft^3/sec.

        Doug at one point owned an engine; was that a J79 or something else?

        Speaking of surplus; I just found out my friends in NorCal have a Diesel
        genset from a CO in a back storage building.....a 750KVA unit.

        That's ~60gal/hr of #2....gulp.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.