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Re: [coldwarcomms] VOA Greenville, NC

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  • Dexter W4DEX
    ... I was with a crew staged in the AT&T Wilmington NC POP in 1996 during hurricane Bertha. I believe this storm was a category 2 when it passed over
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 27, 2011
      Tom Scanlan wrote:
      >
      >
      > FWIW, just saw a report on CNN that some of Hurricane Irene's roughest
      > winds were due to slice thru the area between Greenville and
      > Washington, NC. VOA's receive/transmit facility east of Greenville was
      > the subject of some discussion recently...
      >
      > Hoped to grab a look-see at this facility sometime this fall. Have
      > been to the 2,000' shared use tower for the NBC and CBS stations
      > there, as well as ABC's separate big stick, but never got a chance to
      > see the VOA set-up.
      >
      > I wonder what will be left after Irene?
      >
      I was with a crew staged in the AT&T Wilmington NC POP in 1996 during
      hurricane Bertha. I believe this storm was a category 2 when it passed
      over Wilmington. The track took it right over Greenville so Washington
      was saw the a bit stronger winds. I don't recall hearing of any major
      tower damage but there was a lot of flooding in that area.

      Bertha's eye passed right over the POP. A local anemometer showed gusts
      at 120 mph as the eye approached but within maybe five minutes all was
      calm. We open the door and saw clear blue sky overhead so we know we
      were in the eye. Maybe 10 minutes or so later the winds reversed
      direction moving lots of derbies that had moved down the street back up
      the street.

      Floyd hit the same area in 1999 just a month after I retired so I was
      100+ miles inland for that one. The biggie for my area just east of
      Charlotte was in Hugo in 1989. That storm took this area by surprise as
      they usually greatly weaken after traveling over so much land. I saw
      100+ mph winds on my anemometer up on my tower at 100 feet before the
      power went off. Then the winds blew stronger laying over several very
      old oak trees. There was no service outage at the microwave sites
      around the area but fuel did have to be hauled to several sites after
      the generators ran for a few days. These sites were acquired at
      divestiture so didn't have the large tanks most AT&T engineered sites
      had. The turbines at the Stanfield hardened site ran for I believe 5
      days before commercial power was restored. I'm fairly sure that was the
      longest duration run they ever saw there. Maybe they saw more when they
      were taken out when the site was closed an put on restoration platforms
      to be shipped wherever needed. One of the turbines was airlifted to
      Northridge CA to restore service after the earthquake in 95.

      Dexter
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