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Re: [coldwarcomms] Coaxial Cable Descriptions

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  • albertjlafrance@cs.com
    In a message dated 6/12/2001 8:45:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... There s a photo of an opened lead-cased splice on a wire-pair (non-coaxial) underground
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2001
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      In a message dated 6/12/2001 8:45:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      james.e.innes.cgs80@... writes:

      > Regarding cable splicing, let's not neglect the final step. Once each coax
      > "tube" and the center pairs are spliced, they are then encased with an
      > insulating shield (some sort of jute type material, as I recall), and then
      > the entire splice is placed in a mold. Molten lead is then poured via hand
      > ladles (just like soup ladles) to encase the splice. For an 8 tube cable,
      > the molded splice is about 5" in diameter and about 20" long. I have one
      > half of completed splice stored in a closet at my office.

      There's a photo of an opened lead-cased splice on a wire-pair (non-coaxial)
      underground cable at:

      http://www.angelfire.com/ab/sentee/opensplice.html

      The page belongs to a telephone technician, and includes other photos and
      descriptions of current underground cable work. The top-level URL is:

      http://www.angelfire.com/ab/sentee/index.html

      The lead splice is part of the series titled "An ADSL Job".

      > There was lots of L-carrier around my neighborhood (Malvern, PA, about 23
      > mi. W. of Philadelphia), including a splice point and maybe a non hardened
      > repeater in front of my house. In the 60's, I recall seeing the
      > installation crews all over the place, and the large reels of cable. On my
      > street, North Valley Rd., there was coax carrying video, a part of what
      was
      > then called "National Loop." The Loop carried network programming for NBC,
      > CBS, and ABC to each local affiliate station. Once, when the North Valley
      > Road bridge over Little Valley Creek was washed out about a mile away, all
      > three Philly network TV affiliates had to run all local programming for
      > almost 24 hours. My father and I were at the bridge when it finally
      > collapsed, and we later went up and watched the splice crews after the
      > waters receded. I sure missed seeing "I Love Lucy" that night.

      TV program distribution system over the Bell System network is an interesting
      topic. I read somewhere that Television Operating Centers (TOC) often had to
      reconfigure the network feeds in just a few minutes. I think this may have
      been during a switch from, for example, a news program originating in New
      York to an entertainment program from LA.

      It's also fascinating how this was done with analog technology, where each of
      the many repeaters involved had to meet strict requirements to avoid
      excessive noise and distortion.

      Albert
    • ozob99@yahoo.com
      ... each coax ... with an ... recall), and then ... poured via hand ... tube cable, ... have one ... (non-coaxial) ... photos and ... about 23 ... non hardened
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 1, 2001
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        --- In coldwarcomms@y..., albertjlafrance@c... wrote:
        > In a message dated 6/12/2001 8:45:18 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        > james.e.innes.cgs80@a... writes:
        >
        > > Regarding cable splicing, let's not neglect the final step. Once
        each coax
        > > "tube" and the center pairs are spliced, they are then encased
        with an
        > > insulating shield (some sort of jute type material, as I
        recall),
        and then
        > > the entire splice is placed in a mold. Molten lead is then
        poured via hand
        > > ladles (just like soup ladles) to encase the splice. For an 8
        tube cable,
        > > the molded splice is about 5" in diameter and about 20" long. I
        have one
        > > half of completed splice stored in a closet at my office.
        >
        > There's a photo of an opened lead-cased splice on a wire-pair
        (non-coaxial)
        > underground cable at:
        >
        > http://www.angelfire.com/ab/sentee/opensplice.html
        >
        > The page belongs to a telephone technician, and includes other
        photos and
        > descriptions of current underground cable work. The top-level URL
        is:
        >
        > http://www.angelfire.com/ab/sentee/index.html
        >
        > The lead splice is part of the series titled "An ADSL Job".
        >
        > > There was lots of L-carrier around my neighborhood (Malvern, PA,
        about 23
        > > mi. W. of Philadelphia), including a splice point and maybe a
        non
        hardened
        > > repeater in front of my house. In the 60's, I recall seeing the
        > > installation crews all over the place, and the large reels of
        cable. On my
        > > street, North Valley Rd., there was coax carrying video, a part
        of what
        > was
        > > then called "National Loop." The Loop carried network
        programming for NBC,
        > > CBS, and ABC to each local affiliate station. Once, when the
        North Valley
        > > Road bridge over Little Valley Creek was washed out about a mile
        away, all
        > > three Philly network TV affiliates had to run all local
        programming for
        > > almost 24 hours. My father and I were at the bridge when it
        finally
        > > collapsed, and we later went up and watched the splice crews
        after the
        > > waters receded. I sure missed seeing "I Love Lucy" that night.
        >
        > TV program distribution system over the Bell System network is an
        interesting
        > topic. I read somewhere that Television Operating Centers (TOC)
        often had to
        > reconfigure the network feeds in just a few minutes. I think this
        may have
        > been during a switch from, for example, a news program originating
        in New
        > York to an entertainment program from LA.



        This switching of network feeds was on a time basis,typically
        30 seconds before the start of the program; & occasionally on a cue
        such a phrase or key word....the change of feed to a TV station was
        known as a "deviation" & was verified 3 times a day at each shift
        change; CBS TV had them regularly, called "sectionals", and were
        feeds with different ads during the same program for various sections
        of the country. Sports events were often produced by non network
        independents( like C.D. Chesley & Hughs Sports Net) and distributed
        via AT&T "occasional TV" channels(often a protection channel) to be
        switched into local network
        stations.This was usually done at the TVOC(Television Operating
        Center)at the video level as a manual switch in the TVOC,via
        mechanical pushbuttons or electrically operated switches; the larger
        TVOC's also remotely operated some switches at Microwave Stations on
        an IF basis via sequential signalling & telemetry. Switching
        operations in the TVOC were a high priority with alarm bells &
        flashing
        lights going off prior to a switch;all switches required a 2nd man to
        verify & sign off, and all other personnel had to clear out of the
        area.Operating errors were a serious offense.The stations were quick
        to put up the "AT&T trouble" notice on their broadcast.

        The TV audio was on K & L CXR up to the 1970's & had to be switched
        in many cases. Radio network stations also had audio sectionals and
        independent feeds that had to be switched, usually via patch cords in
        a jack field .




        > It's also fascinating how this was done with analog technology,
        where each of
        > the many repeaters involved had to meet strict requirements to
        avoid
        > excessive noise and distortion.
        >
        > Albert
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