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Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: 45 E Street NW - Is this a Telephone Co Building?

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  • David
    ... I know it; it s a sub. You can see the huge doors for moving switchgear in and out. They usually have revealing warning signs if you look closely; they
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 13, 2011
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      On 1/13/11 5:42 PM, Albert LaFrance wrote:

      > The DC real estate tax database shows it's owned by the Potomac Electric
      > Power Company, so I'd guess it's a power substation. PEPCO has a number of
      > other well-disguised subs in the city, including one that looks like a
      > single-family house.


      I know it; it's a sub. You can see the huge doors for moving switchgear in
      and out. They usually have revealing warning signs if you look closely;
      they won't blatantly say "PEPCO SUBSTATION, PLACE BOMB HERE" (al-la
      <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Metesky>) but it's not rocket science
      to grok what it is.
    • John Young
      There is a tradition of designing electrical substations to fit a neighborhood. This followed protests of the early industrial look favored by engineers who
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 13, 2011
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        There is a tradition of designing electrical substations to fit a
        neighborhood. This followed protests of the early industrial
        look favored by engineers who wanted nothing fancy to
        interfere with straightforward engineering function. Architects
        jumped at the chance to dress the facilities in high couture of the
        day, so much so that any number of the stations were way
        overdressed for their neighbors and often looked more like
        banks and libraries and universities than residential and biz
        facilities. Those in DC aptly copied the monumental style
        of bloated bureaucracies.

        The utilities liked being valorized as well, like bureaucrats, to
        overcome that ordinary name and show off as high-faluting public
        servants, burp, with a nice hand-off of the extra cost through
        monopolistic practices beloved by governments, banks and
        investors.

        Many of the New York Transit substations were designed to look
        fancy. To enter one is to pass through the looking glass from fairly
        titinnus screeching street to damnation roaring dynamoes and
        clacking, arcing 800KV circuit breakers the kin stamp presses.

        Even now Con Ed in NYC is constructing substations to look like
        multiple million-dollar rowhouses, with brick veneer, blank windows
        and doors camouflaging reinforced concrete walls designed for
        terrorist blast protection. Louvers also designed to resist blast
        but you need to look closely to see the force-diffusing layers required.

        A favorite Con Ed substation is the one constucted in the lower
        floors of 7 WTC adjoining 1776-high World Trade Center. The four
        faces of the facade are constructed of two rows of thin stainless
        steel vertical slats, with triangular cross section, staggered and
        spaced about 2 inches on center. Lean close to the slats and

        you can see the station's interior and equipment. From 3 feet back
        the slats effectively block that view. The premise is that the slats
        will diffuse a blast force but not fully block it. Nothing secret about
        this: NYPD cops always on duty there had no objection to photos
        and video. To be sure, dozens of spy cams were recording all who
        oggled the sacred site.

        For those still following the post-9-11 saga, this sub-station is
        one of two serving downtown Manhattan. It was knocked out
        on 9-11, and the load was picked up by the eastern sub-station
        although wrist-thick high-voltage cabling was laid on the surface
        to maintain service.

        Nearby is an odd transit sub-station located between the US
        Attorney's office and the Metropolitan Detention Center where
        terrorists awaiting or on trial are housed. It was there long before
        the two justice buildings were constructed in the 1970s. The architect
        added a layer of masonry on the substation's facade to match
        its new neighbors. A small sign once identified the station but
        it was removed after 9-11. Now it is indicated by a Jersey barrier
        and parked van in front of the large equipment access door.
        (This is across the street from NYPD HQ.) Go around back
        and the station can be inspected close-up along with whatever
        you want to peek of the USA and detention center countrsurveillance
        system which will be minutely recording your gawking. Don't be
        nervous, this area is now a prime tourist attraction and groups
        wander through looking at the highly publicized terrorist threat
        attractions. No kidding, US Marshals on duty are quite welcoming,
        explain there is no restriction on photography or video, one
        saying, "look this is your property do what you want." That is
        not what those everready boyos in DC say, or once didn't,
        maybe they too have figured out the threat is theatrical and
        good for tourist, ie, taxpayer, business.

        Finally, those who enjoy terrorism tourism from Northern
        Ireland to Lebanon, should put Manhattan's "Ring of Steel"
        and the battle of the Masjids on the itinerary. NYPD needs
        your support to compete with the cities where it has assigned
        officers to see what the latest fashion is, directed, as you
        correctly guess, by ex-CIA David Cohen who specialized
        while at the agency in the economic benefits of worldwide
        threat generation.
      • David
        ... I have a book on the old NYCTA power stations. They took in 25Hz and using rotary converters, created the 650VDC needed. And oh yes, they looked fancy. The
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 13, 2011
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          On 1/13/11 7:56 PM, John Young wrote:

          > Many of the New York Transit substations were designed to look
          > fancy. To enter one is to pass through the looking glass from fairly
          > titinnus screeching street to damnation roaring dynamoes and
          > clacking, arcing 800KV circuit breakers the kin stamp presses.

          I have a book on the old NYCTA power stations. They took in 25Hz and using
          rotary converters, created the 650VDC needed. And oh yes, they looked fancy.

          The rotary converters were rather interesting; they were not M-G sets but
          one core wound to do the whole job. They were also bidirectional; they'd
          make 25 Hz from DC.

          Boston, as I recall, had a [MBTA] rotary [converter] mounted in the center
          of a [traffic] rotary.
        • Bill Smith
          A lot of that exterior design is forced upon them by municipal planners to fit in with the neighborhood. If the electric company had their way, it would just
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 13, 2011
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            A lot of that exterior design is forced upon them by municipal planners to fit
            in with the neighborhood. If the electric company had their way, it would just
            fence it in because it's cheaper.  I suspect a good portion of that blast
            protection is more for protection of the area citizens in case of a fault and
            subsequent fire and flying debris. You really don't need an explosive device to
            knock out a substation.

            Bill



            ________________________________
            From: John Young <jya@...>
            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, January 13, 2011 6:56:00 PM
            Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: 45 E Street NW - Is this a Telephone Co
            Building?

             
            There is a tradition of designing electrical substations to fit a
            neighborhood. This followed protests of the early industrial
            look favored by engineers who wanted nothing fancy to
            interfere with straightforward engineering function. Architects
            jumped at the chance to dress the facilities in high couture of the
            day, so much so that any number of the stations were way
            overdressed for their neighbors and often looked more like
            banks and libraries and universities than residential and biz
            facilities. Those in DC aptly copied the monumental style
            of bloated bureaucracies.

            The utilities liked being valorized as well, like bureaucrats, to
            overcome that ordinary name and show off as high-faluting public
            servants, burp, with a nice hand-off of the extra cost through
            monopolistic practices beloved by governments, banks and
            investors.

            Many of the New York Transit substations were designed to look
            fancy. To enter one is to pass through the looking glass from fairly
            titinnus screeching street to damnation roaring dynamoes and
            clacking, arcing 800KV circuit breakers the kin stamp presses.

            Even now Con Ed in NYC is constructing substations to look like
            multiple million-dollar rowhouses, with brick veneer, blank windows
            and doors camouflaging reinforced concrete walls designed for
            terrorist blast protection. Louvers also designed to resist blast
            but you need to look closely to see the force-diffusing layers required.

            A favorite Con Ed substation is the one constucted in the lower
            floors of 7 WTC adjoining 1776-high World Trade Center. The four
            faces of the facade are constructed of two rows of thin stainless
            steel vertical slats, with triangular cross section, staggered and
            spaced about 2 inches on center. Lean close to the slats and

            you can see the station's interior and equipment. From 3 feet back
            the slats effectively block that view. The premise is that the slats
            will diffuse a blast force but not fully block it. Nothing secret about
            this: NYPD cops always on duty there had no objection to photos
            and video. To be sure, dozens of spy cams were recording all who
            oggled the sacred site.

            For those still following the post-9-11 saga, this sub-station is
            one of two serving downtown Manhattan. It was knocked out
            on 9-11, and the load was picked up by the eastern sub-station
            although wrist-thick high-voltage cabling was laid on the surface
            to maintain service.

            Nearby is an odd transit sub-station located between the US
            Attorney's office and the Metropolitan Detention Center where
            terrorists awaiting or on trial are housed. It was there long before
            the two justice buildings were constructed in the 1970s. The architect
            added a layer of masonry on the substation's facade to match
            its new neighbors. A small sign once identified the station but
            it was removed after 9-11. Now it is indicated by a Jersey barrier
            and parked van in front of the large equipment access door.
            (This is across the street from NYPD HQ.) Go around back
            and the station can be inspected close-up along with whatever
            you want to peek of the USA and detention center countrsurveillance
            system which will be minutely recording your gawking. Don't be
            nervous, this area is now a prime tourist attraction and groups
            wander through looking at the highly publicized terrorist threat
            attractions. No kidding, US Marshals on duty are quite welcoming,
            explain there is no restriction on photography or video, one
            saying, "look this is your property do what you want." That is
            not what those everready boyos in DC say, or once didn't,
            maybe they too have figured out the threat is theatrical and
            good for tourist, ie, taxpayer, business.

            Finally, those who enjoy terrorism tourism from Northern
            Ireland to Lebanon, should put Manhattan's "Ring of Steel"
            and the battle of the Masjids on the itinerary. NYPD needs
            your support to compete with the cities where it has assigned
            officers to see what the latest fashion is, directed, as you
            correctly guess, by ex-CIA David Cohen who specialized
            while at the agency in the economic benefits of worldwide
            threat generation.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mike Walker
            Did you see any signs that indicated telco ownership of this building? I can t make out the details or read all the signs on the doors in your photos, but yeah
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 13, 2011
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              Did you see any signs that indicated telco ownership of this building? I
              can't make out the details or read all the signs on the doors in your
              photos, but yeah it looks like a telco building to me . . . many of our
              central offices in Florida and Georgia look somewhat like this building.


              Mike


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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